Knife Rights Files Amicus Brief in MA Supreme Court Switchblade Case

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I'm not a knife person, but posting this for those interested in switchblade knives. Atty. Jason Guida posted the info on his FB page. They are attacking this law as a 2A issue.

Knife Rights Files Amicus Brief in MA Supreme Court Switchblade Case​


Knife Rights has filed an Amicus (Friend of the Court) Brief with the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court in a criminal case involving illegal carry of a switchblade. In Commonwealth v. Canjura the Appellant has challenged the constitutionality under the Second Amendment of Massachusetts’ ban on carry of a switchblade. A decision in favor of the Appellant could strike down the Commonwealth’s ban on carry of switchblades.
Follow the rest of this with the text of the Amicus Brief on the above webpage.
 
I have absolute confidence that the SJC will make the wrong decision. Given what I’ve seen of their decisions in the past, I expect their decision in this case to be completely incomprehensible with something along the lines of “maybe it is a switchblade or maybe it isn’t, but every case will have to be decided on its own.”
 
where the fark did this come from in the article?

Canjura’s case rests on whether knives were intended by Congress to be considered in their definition of “arms” protected by the Second Amendment.

Congress?

And if knives are allowed since they have been weapons since the dawn of time, can we have our bayonet lugs put back on our guns?
 
where the fark did this come from in the article?

Canjura’s case rests on whether knives were intended by Congress to be considered in their definition of “arms” protected by the Second Amendment.

Congress?

And if knives are allowed since they have been weapons since the dawn of time, can we have our bayonet lugs put back on our guns?

The Continental Congress maybe, but I suspect that’s giving the writer way too much credit.
 
where the fark did this come from in the article?

Canjura’s case rests on whether knives were intended by Congress to be considered in their definition of “arms” protected by the Second Amendment.

Congress?

And if knives are allowed since they have been weapons since the dawn of time, can we have our bayonet lugs put back on our guns?
It would be amazing if a knife case is what brings the 2A debate back to the conversation of "appropriate for militia use"
 
The Continental Congress maybe, but I suspect that’s giving the writer way too much credit.
well it was Congress prior to October 2, 1789 that adopted the 12 articles that Washington sent to the states for ratification, of which 10 were ratified by enough states to become what we call The Bill Of Rights

Good luck trying to find the intent of Congress and the states that ratified the 2A on the subject of knives, there was no C-SPAN back then, but bayonets were in regular use

Riflemen Knives, also called ‘Butcher’ or ‘Scalping’ Knives. This longer version of blade knife often reached a length of 12” or more. It is reasoned they acquired the name ‘riflemen knife’ since they were the basic equipment of the rifleman, along with his firelock (rifle) and tomahawk. The blade often reached a foot in length. It was basically a butcher’s knife (hence it’s other name), having its single edge and ‘choil’ creating an off-center appearance to the blade. The choil is the notch between the cutting edge and the blade tang or ricasso (unsharpened length of blade just above the guard or handle) – it notifies you where to stop sharpening the blade.


Being long, with a single sharpened edge and a flat spine, these knives were carried by civilians who joined the American Revolution. Like today’s military knives, they were high in carbon, which gives excellent edge retention, but since they could be brittle, it explains their longer length. Even as a soldier’s choice for weapon of war, it was used for everything the soldier needed, whether it was opening boxes, shaving, skinning wild game, or anything else requiring a sharped blade. Simple guard and hilt mountings were usually iron, brass, pewter, or silver, and the grips were generally of wood (hardwoods such as hickory, maple, walnut, apple, or cherry), horn, bone, or antler. Most blades were imported however, some were created by local blacksmiths or fashioned from old files, saws, or swords.
 
well it was Congress prior to October 2, 1789 that adopted the 12 articles that Washington sent to the states for ratification, of which 10 were ratified by enough states to become what we call The Bill Of Rights

Good luck trying to find the intent of Congress and the states that ratified the 2A on the subject of knives, there was no C-SPAN back then, but bayonets were in regular use

Riflemen Knives, also called ‘Butcher’ or ‘Scalping’ Knives. This longer version of blade knife often reached a length of 12” or more. It is reasoned they acquired the name ‘riflemen knife’ since they were the basic equipment of the rifleman, along with his firelock (rifle) and tomahawk. The blade often reached a foot in length. It was basically a butcher’s knife (hence it’s other name), having its single edge and ‘choil’ creating an off-center appearance to the blade. The choil is the notch between the cutting edge and the blade tang or ricasso (unsharpened length of blade just above the guard or handle) – it notifies you where to stop sharpening the blade.


Being long, with a single sharpened edge and a flat spine, these knives were carried by civilians who joined the American Revolution. Like today’s military knives, they were high in carbon, which gives excellent edge retention, but since they could be brittle, it explains their longer length. Even as a soldier’s choice for weapon of war, it was used for everything the soldier needed, whether it was opening boxes, shaving, skinning wild game, or anything else requiring a sharped blade. Simple guard and hilt mountings were usually iron, brass, pewter, or silver, and the grips were generally of wood (hardwoods such as hickory, maple, walnut, apple, or cherry), horn, bone, or antler. Most blades were imported however, some were created by local blacksmiths or fashioned from old files, saws, or swords.

You’re right of course and I’m a moron (of course).
 
You’re right of course and I’m a moron (of course).
I was wrong too, so I guess we both can wear the pointy hat and sit in the corner.

Congress adopted the 2A, the required number of states in existence at the time ratified the amendment and it was incorporated into the U S Constitution, affirming the right to keep and bear arms.
 
the real irony, is according to the description of the knife.....it's a 'spring assist'....not a pushbutton switchblade.
So if the Commonwealth prevails, knives that we all carry, spring assist, will suddenly become switchblades.

 
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