One pistol do all mindset

Wickedcoolname

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Persinaly, I think everyone's first handgun should be a double action .22lr, like a model 18 for example. You can learn all of the basics like safe gun handling, breathing, stance, sight alignment, trigger control, etc with a very accurate and very simple gun with good sights and an excellent trigger along with zero felt recoil and almost no muzzle blast. And it's the cheapest handgun ammo out there so you can afford to shoot the thousands of rounds it takes to become a good pistol shooter.
 

frenchman

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Could you guys maybe stop suggesting .22s and revolvers? The OP asked about the best all around PISTOL. A pistol is not a revolver, I shit you not. Look it up. .22 is not an all around caliber, and the OP didn't ask what caliber to get for his 6 year old daughter.
OP: you're going to be just fine with your 320 C. I think you made a good, although uninformed choice. In other words, you kinda lucked out, but I'd it felt good in your hands, that's half the rent right there. Join a range or club and start shooting. Find out if you like the pistol and the hobby. Take it from there. I own Glocks, and they're not all they're cracked up to be. Take a class or two, preferably with a good instructor like Cloverleaf, and make sure to do some research before you buy a holster and a (super important) gun belt, and invest in ammo. Most people who don't reload swear by target sports. Enjoy the gun and welcome to the addiction.
 

TheGreekFreak

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I also thought I would be a one gun does it all guy when I got my LTC.....ya, that didn't last long lol

Like alot of people said, you can't go wrong with a G19 or similar compact jack of all trades setup. I'm a small dude and can easily conceal it with just a t-shirt on. Don't forget to invest in a good belt + holster after you make your decision.

One thing to consider is if you want access to preban mags for the gun. The benefit of most Glocks, some Sigs like the P226/229, Beretta 92, etc is the availability of prebans that us MA folk have the privilege of being able to own bestowed upon us by our rulers. It was a factor for my carry gun as I prefer to have 15 rounds instead of 10 without the guaranteed felony.

With out hesitation a Smith & Wesson Model 19 with a 4" barrel. If you look hard enough try to find a Model 19-3. Every now and then I see one at a gun show. A red ramp and white outline sights a bonus. I had a Python and I preferred the 19 over it.
Yes! This on deck for me. Looking for a decent deal on a 4" 19-3 blued model. Good condition one's have gotten pricey though.....it's nice but not $800+ nice.
 

1776

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Aaaaah a "cheap" "all around" "Nice" gun. Now we're talking NES!
I think you get a choice of one of the three attributes, with a high probability, and close to zero probability for all three.
Test this approach with replacing gun with bimbo.
 
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frenchman

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Hey! Carefull there. My entire sex life relied on nice, cheap bimbos, at some point in my life. Here and there, you could strike gold and get an all around one too. So, they're out there. The bimbos, not the guns.
 

Vincent_Diesel

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Persinaly, I think everyone's first handgun should be a double action .22lr, like a model 18 for example. You can learn all of the basics like safe gun handling, breathing, stance, sight alignment, trigger control, etc with a very accurate and very simple gun with good sights and an excellent trigger along with zero felt recoil and almost no muzzle blast. And it's the cheapest handgun ammo out there so you can afford to shoot the thousands of rounds it takes to become a good pistol shooter.
Had shot one of these out west, it's a Ruger Single Six. Totally hear what you are saying, just didn't feel comfortable for me, hated to load and unload the thing. Revolvers just aesthetically speaking don't do it for me. Thanks for the advice. I do agree with .22lr maybe in a 1911 style, that'd be sweet.
 

Vincent_Diesel

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G19x. I still need to get a couple after shooting a few.

I've been carrying a G34 with an extended mag for 3+ years now though, so... [laugh]
Yeah, saw one on the classifieds the other day, brand new in all it's FDE glory. Totally caught my eye, then the price turned me off. 800 bones. I'd love to have one of these, but seems like a pipe dream given my location. Still wondering how these get in ownership, guess I just don't know how the system works.
 

Vincent_Diesel

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Could you guys maybe stop suggesting .22s and revolvers? The OP asked about the best all around PISTOL. A pistol is not a revolver, I shit you not. Look it up. .22 is not an all around caliber, and the OP didn't ask what caliber to get for his 6 year old daughter.
OP: you're going to be just fine with your 320 C. I think you made a good, although uninformed choice. In other words, you kinda lucked out, but I'd it felt good in your hands, that's half the rent right there. Join a range or club and start shooting. Find out if you like the pistol and the hobby. Take it from there. I own Glocks, and they're not all they're cracked up to be. Take a class or two, preferably with a good instructor like Cloverleaf, and make sure to do some research before you buy a holster and a (super important) gun belt, and invest in ammo. Most people who don't reload swear by target sports. Enjoy the gun and welcome to the addiction.
Yeah total impulse buy even though it's still in the GS, paid for, just waiting for my LTC. Did feel really good, sights were amazing instant attraction. This video made me feel good about the purchase days later. Seemed like an honest test. TL:DR Glock owner/fanboy shoots better with Sig, in fact all of them shot better with a Sig, made me wonder.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l1tNTrqPRxQ
 

ridleyman

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Glock 46ZBX .54 magnum with gas abatement recoil inhibitors and a reflective velocity enhancer.

Seriously, your 1st gun should be a .22 to practice safety and shooting basics, and then get a Glock 19 or Springfield Armory XD Mod 2 in .45 or 9mm or SW Shield
 

RKG

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One man's view:

The answer to the OP's question is a simple "No.". There is no such thing as a one handgun does it all. And luckily so, for the attributes that make a handgun good for one type of application (e.g., walking in the woods in bear country) would make it pretty useless in another (e.g., deep concealment in formal dress).

Happily, there is (in my opinion) no truth to the notion that expertise and familiarity with one handgun would make it is possible (or difficult or burdensome) to be equally proficient and familiar with a different handgun. No more so than having two different cars to drive.

I usually carry a SA/SA SIG in 9mm. Except when I carry a striker-fired M&P 45C. Except when I carry a .380 P238, or it's forebear, an M1911A1. I walk in the woods with one of two N-Frames, in either .41 Rem. Mag. or .44 Special. And I polish my skills with an SR-22.
 

Vincent_Diesel

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Digging in a bit deeper it seems the consensus, among other things, is learning with a .22. As mentioned above I seem to appreciate the semi's more, no offense to the revolver types. Di the aesthetic of a 1911 style. Really interested in a SIG Mosquito but no longer produced. Any other reccos?

Again, thanks everyone. Totally subscribed here.
 

C. Stockwell

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Hi all,

First post here. As I await my LTC renewal to come (45 days now and counting), I have had the urge to purchase my first pistol. Whether my intent is for target shooting, home defense, carry, conversation starter at the club, etc. is it possible or even advisable to have one pistol to check all the boxes and do well in all of them?

I am under a mindset, being a new owner, that having more than one pistol may interfere with how I'm able to adapt to it all situations. Different grip angles, sight planes, bore axis, grip feel, blah blah blah... I'm sure this topic has been discussed several times, but given my situation I would appreciate the help. Thank you.

On hold at the local shop is a Sig P320 compact, Sig Pro Cut Slide and Leupold Deltapoint Pro with lower 1/3 co-witness sights.
Alright here's the deal: any duty-sized pistol that isn't a piece of total shit like a Nambu or a Glisenti will do anything you want to do. Glock, 1911, Sig, Beretta 92, HK, duty-sized revolvers (S&W, Ruger Security Six), FNs, Browning Hi Powers, whatever. Christ, a Hi-Point will do everything you want to do as a newb. A decently-made modern pistol should be expected to function flawlessly, or as near flawlessly as possible with a competent shooter behind the trigger and ignoring any unique parameters like "must survive an InRange mud test!" If that was a strict parameter, we'd all be carrying M1912 Steyr-Hahns.


So you need to actually define a specific purpose and gain experience to understand what you subjectively like to really narrow the results.

For example, how much do you have available to spend? If that answer is $300, Hi-Point or surplus CommBloc pistol like a vz. 82/83 FTW. $500? Police trade-in Glock or Beretta or BHP. $750? New Glock or HK. $1000? $1000 will buy any modern pistol within reason. A pistol over $1000 is really a specialty item and above a newb's capabilities.

Are you in Mass? If so, you "have" to "deal" with the List.

How do you define target shooting? Shooting at paper in an indoor range? USPSA? IDPA? Bullseye shooting (Bullseye is a "thing" if you didn't know)? Cowboy Action Shooting? Shooting at cans in the woods? 3-Gun? CMP? If by "target shooting" you mean "shooting at a paper target on a square range and not action or any specialty shooting," it doesn't really matter what you're shooting as long as you don't hate the gun.

Until you can articulate a specific reason to buy a specific pistol, just try a handful of handguns that are readily available, perk your interest, and within your realistic price range. The job defines the tool.

Another thing: if you're shooting a specific kind of target shooting, like say USPSA or IDPA or Cowboy or 3-Gun, then you should talk to those competitors about what they use and what they would suggest to succeed at that sport.

And for f*ck's sake, I hate when people I don't know ask me about my guns. I had some guy from CT try to talk to me about my BHP last week.


I’ve learned more on this post than a trip to the local gun store. Quite amazing, thanks all. Here’s the high-level recap:

1. Everyone should own a Glock. Haha.
2. There is a gun for every occasion, situation
3. Practice, practice and practice more
4. Lie to the old lady about your possessions
5. Stockpile ammo
6. This forum is the place to get answers. And fast.

Now I’m off to the classifieds fellas.
1) Everyone should shoot a Glock. Buy one if you want one. Don't let other people tell you what to buy. Especially gun store salesmen. Define the job, do research, and touch and shoot anything on your option list.
2) More or less correct.
3) Yes.
4) If you lie to the wife, expect to be divorced.
5) Yes.
6) We don't have anything else to do with our time. This amuses us.

Digging in a bit deeper it seems the consensus, among other things, is learning with a .22. As mentioned above I seem to appreciate the semi's more, no offense to the revolver types. Di the aesthetic of a 1911 style. Really interested in a SIG Mosquito but no longer produced. Any other reccos?

Again, thanks everyone. Totally subscribed here.
So here's the thing with .22 pistols. They're great training tools for new shooters, as you seem to be. But they're not really serious defensive tools. The ammo isn't as reliable as centerfire ammo either, in terms of "chamber, bang, extract, eject." A .22 pistol is fine to start to learning with. But be ready to upgrade to something bigger for a serious defensive tool in the future.

Also, the 1911 is obsolete. They remain competitive in matches that are handicapped down to the level of the 1911, but not in matches where they have to compete with a modern, double stack 9x19 pistol. Simple math here: if you have 7 or 8 shots in a mag and you need to hit 20 targets on the clock, you need to at least reload twice assuming you don't miss or only need one shot per target. With a modern pistol with a mag of 15+ shots, you would only need to reload once. There's a reason why the 2011 exists. And I'm not even talking about the historic unreliability of the 1911 where guys in the 80s bought a brand new Colt and sent it immediately to a gunsmith before even unboxing and shooting it. You're not restricted to FMJ ammo as a civilian who's concealed carrying.

If you want a 1911 just because you want a 1911, just say so and own it. But try to be as objective as possible about gun purchases, rather than "it looks pretty!" You banging your guns? They're tools.

This entire thread is pointless, past the second post.
Yeah. Pretty much.
 
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BigAl23

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Yes, for my first pistol I think I may have taken the more expensive approach. I was sold on the modular aspect of it, buy one frame and have multiple options. I am in 1200.00+ for all the things I have put into it. But my rationale is I have a compact pistol for carry, a pistol with a red dot for range/practice, a slide configuration for bling... Now all that while not dealing with adjusting to different grip angles, bore heights, weight, feel etc.

I wonder for that kind of coin, I should have just bought 2 pistols... :( I am second guessing my approach.
You could've bought a G19 and G26 for that money, Mass prices too. LOL
 

dcmdon

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Hi all,

First post here. As I await my LTC renewal to come (45 days now and counting), I have had the urge to purchase my first pistol. Whether my intent is for target shooting, home defense, carry, conversation starter at the club, etc. is it possible or even advisable to have one pistol to check all the boxes and do well in all of them?

I am under a mindset, being a new owner, that having more than one pistol may interfere with how I'm able to adapt to it all situations. Different grip angles, sight planes, bore axis, grip feel, blah blah blah... I'm sure this topic has been discussed several times, but given my situation I would appreciate the help. Thank you.

On hold at the local shop is a Sig P320 compact, Sig Pro Cut Slide and Leupold Deltapoint Pro with lower 1/3 co-witness sights.
No i haven't read all 120 responses.

One pistol to do all will result in a pistol that does nothing exceptionally well.

As someone who has taught hundreds of people to shoot I can tellyou a few things with absolute certainty.

1) if you by a G19/P320 compact sized gun for both range/home and carry, you won't carry it. Its simply too big and heavy for most people to carry regularly.
2) Your skills are rudimentary. You need repetition on the cheap with a gun that won't induce a flinch.

If you want to be a crappy shooting gun guy that I see all the time at the range. Fine. Go get a 19.

If you actually want to progress do this.

1) Buy a .22 handgun
2) Buy 5000 rounds of .22. (It should cost you $240 from the mail order place that begins with T. (is it ok to say the name now?))
3) Shoot 1000 rounds while focusing on trigger press, sight alignment/picture, grip and stance.
4) Keep a log book in your shooting bag. Do a self critique at the end of every range session.
5) Buy a "practical/tactical" sized 9mm with a 5" barrel. Like a G34.
6) Go to the range and continue focusing on the .22 but shoot a 5 round mag out of the 9mm gun at the end of the first couple of range sessions.
7) Work slowly. Its easier to avoid a push or flinch than it is to fix it.
8) Move up to 2 - 5 round mags. (Never put more than 5 rounds in. You need practice changing mags. This will give you practice. )
9) If you start to shoot low you are pushing the gun anticipating recoil. Go bck to the .22 and shoot only the .22 forthe next range trip.
10) Continue. Repeat until you are proficient slow fire with the 9mm.
11) Take a defensive shooting class where you will learn about
  • Cover / Concealment and the difference
  • Moving and shooting
  • Speed vs accuracy
  • Draw from a holster
  • Mag changes
  • clearing stoppages.
12) start attending local IDPA or equivalent matches.
13) When you have made SharpShooter or equivalent go buy yourself a "always" gun. Don't delude yourself into thinking you will "always" carry that P365. I'm talking ALWAYS. For most people a 365 is too big and heavy for that. My Always Gun is a Kahr P380. The less expensive CW380 is just as good and is the best compromise for me of weight, size and shootability. I had a LCP that was terrible to shoot, but reliable and small. I'm told the LCP2 is much more shootable. So I'd try to test fire both the LCP2 and the Kahr before buying. The Kahr is ammo sensitive. It runs 100% with some ammo and 50% with other. I've got some extra 50% ammo that I use to induce malfunctions when I least expect them.

14) Practice with this gun a minimum of 10 times. Don't shoot it a lot at each session, or you could induce the dreaded push. Maybe 10 round - 2 mags of 5 each.

Now you have it. A battery of 3 guns that will do pretty much everything you want. If you want a 4th, get a small 9mm that works well IWB, like a P365 or G43.

And don't scrimp on the holsters or belt. Good ones make carrying easier, bad ones make it uncomfortable.

One last point. How easy is it to induce a push? It takes only 1 shot.

Let me give a personal example. I have been shooting handloaded .44 magnums for years. I owned a .460 XVR with a 8" barrel. I am very used to recoil. Over the last 30+ years I've progressed where when shooting slowly, the only thing that moves is my trigger finger.

I recently had a chance to shoot a relatively light and small Ruger Bisley Super Blackhawk in .454 Cassul. I ran my target down to 25 yards, focused hard on the front sight and gently pressed the trigger while doing a respiratory pause. The shot broke, ALL HELL BROKE LOSE, the gun went up, it hurt, a flash came out of the muzzle, and at the end of it all, the round hit the target dead in the middle of the X ring. NICE.

Care to guess where the second shot went?? How about so low that the bullet only barely nicked the bottom edge of the target.

One shot, was all it took to induce an unconsicious (subconscious??) fear of that gun that resulted in me pushing it ahead of the shot. I opened the gun, thanked the gun owner for the opportunity and went back to my .44 magnum to recover.

Holy crap. I've just spent too much time on this. Hope this helps.
 

dcmdon

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So here's the thing with .22 pistols. They're great training tools for new shooters, as you seem to be. But they're not really serious defensive tools. The ammo isn't as reliable as centerfire ammo either, in terms of "chamber, bang, extract, eject."
I agree except that a .22 revolver is a better choice because simply squeezing the trigger again advances the bad round out of the way and moves another round under the hammer.

With that said, a .22 usually a bad revolver because the DA trigger squeeze is much heavier than a centerfire gun. Makers use heavier main springs to ensure reliable ignition of rimfire ammo. Someone who wants a .22 carry gun is going to be smaller and probably weaker, so the heavy trigger is entirely wrong.

I had a student who had excellent marksmanship skills. She could shoot great. She wanted to do some defensive learning. She just got her LTC and didn't feel ready to carry. Her problem was that she was TOTALLY mechanically inept. Shecouldn't figure out or run a semi-auto.

So we tried my J frame. She took right to running the revolver, but the heavy trigger combined with the small boot grip on my gun made shooting difficult. The LCR has a much better trigger so I borrowed a LCR in .38. She did fine, but didn't like the recoil. So I borrowed a LCR in .22. I had not anticipated the heavy trigger,, but it was a deal breaker.

So Itook a chance and ordered her a LCR in .32 HR Mag. It was love at first shot. The gun had the lighter triggersqueeze of a centerfire gun, with much less recoil than a .38.

For a recoil sensitive person who wants a revolver, the .32 LCR is a real goldilocks gun.
 

cams

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OP, Instead of convincing yourself to limit your mind to one handgun, train yourself to be the one in charge (the gun is just a tool). Train your mind and hands to be able to pick up whatever firearm is within reach and be confident that you as a human are smarter than an inanimate object.
 

mac1911

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Hi all,

First post here. As I await my LTC renewal to come (45 days now and counting), I have had the urge to purchase my first pistol. Whether my intent is for target shooting, home defense, carry, conversation starter at the club, etc. is it possible or even advisable to have one pistol to check all the boxes and do well in all of them?

I am under a mindset, being a new owner, that having more than one pistol may interfere with how I'm able to adapt to it all situations. Different grip angles, sight planes, bore axis, grip feel, blah blah blah... I'm sure this topic has been discussed several times, but given my situation I would appreciate the help. Thank you.

On hold at the local shop is a Sig P320 compact, Sig Pro Cut Slide and Leupold Deltapoint Pro with lower 1/3 co-witness sights.
6” 357 revolver- about the only thing I feel covers all the grounds pretty good.
Can shoot light 38spl target loads for shooting X ring or heavy 357s ?
Maybe go 4” if concealment is easier
 
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I’d say a .357 mag with a 4” barrel is the closest thing to a “do all” gun. However you will find your new “do all” is far insufficient for your needs.

Glock 19 is nice but it gets no bitches.
 
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