US freezes export of civie firearms and ammo for 90 days

Devils Paintbrush

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On Friday, the U.S. Commerce Department announced a temporary halt to the issuance of export licenses for most civilian firearms and ammunition for 90 days, citing vague “national security and foreign policy interests” as the rationale behind the decision, Reuters reported.


“The review will be conducted with urgency and will enable the Department to more effectively assess and mitigate risk of firearms being diverted to entities or activities that promote regional instability, violate human rights, or fuel criminal activities,” the agency said.


The ban includes a sweeping range of semiautomatic and non-automatic firearms like shotguns and optical sights.



This export halt will have a direct economic impact on leading U.S. firearms manufacturers such as Sturm Ruger & Co., Smith & Wesson Brands, and Vista Outdoor. It does affect some of the largest markets for American gun manufacturers, including Brazil, Thailand, and Guatemala, according to Bloomberg.


National security, don't believe it. The exemption list covers almost everyone anyway.
I guess the weapons left in Afghanistan and going to Ukraine isn't affecting regional stability, but what do I know?


Export freeze on firearms and ammo
 
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Wait we could ship a gun out of the country? I thought I would go to prison if I shipped an EoTech sight outta the states lol.
 
Manufacturers go out of business. Viola, no need to ban anything if no one makes them.

But I do wonder exactly how much income anyone gets from out of US sales vs in the US.
Dunno. I think a bigger concern for me is that Vista Outdoors just sold its ammo business to the Czechoslovak Group.
 
But I do wonder exactly how much income anyone gets from out of US sales vs in the US.
Ruger's financials show firearms as 99% of revenue, with "export" being about 5% of Ruger's firearms sales volume.

Smith & Wesson says exports are about 4% of sales.
Dunno. I think a bigger concern for me is that Vista Outdoors just sold its ammo business to the Czechoslovak Group.
In that case we should be glad their exports are on hold for now.
 
Shotguns as well? That is surprising. Even in countries with strict gun control laws, like Japan, shotguns are often allowed for private ownership. Since they lack the range of rifles and are not concealable like handguns, they are viewed by authorities as less of a threat.
 
ITAR controlled items
I used to sell software that was ITAR controlled. I had to have the lawyers fill out forms and have them approved by the gov before I could give a demo license to armies and government agencies in LATAM.

They were right there with jet engines, machine guns, nuclear material.

I thought it was so cool, the lawyers couldn't understand why I was happy when the gov classified the software that way.

I told them, while it would take longer to close a deal, it just made my sales process so much better and my product more valuable. And it worked, the process was simple, I inundated the lawyers with request, they sent the approvals and I closed a ton of business.
 
My Glock rep was talking about this last week - that there was a growing problem with licensed and non-licensed exporters (i.e. FFL 01s/07s) exporting arms without approval to the Ukraine, Israel, and other "pro-American" countries. In both cases, licensed or not, the contracts were murky and effectively undercutting the manufacturers of the firearms or approved domestic exporters. And in some instances, there was a "concern" that the firearms may have ended up in the wrong hands.

I've also seen some potential scams online where funds of something will buy guns for the poor in Israel etc.
 
Manufacturers go out of business. Viola, no need to ban anything if no one makes them.

But I do wonder exactly how much income anyone gets from out of US sales vs in the US.
Do the international guys have factories over seas that can keep up with demand

Hk. Sig, beretta, glock, fn probably do a lot of business over seas

Ruger probably not as much
 
My Glock rep was talking about this last week - that there was a growing problem with licensed and non-licensed exporters (i.e. FFL 01s/07s) exporting arms without approval to the Ukraine, Israel, and other "pro-American" countries. In both cases, licensed or not, the contracts were murky and effectively undercutting the manufacturers of the firearms or approved domestic exporters. And in some instances, there was a "concern" that the firearms may have ended up in the wrong hands.

I've also seen some potential scams online where funds of something will buy guns for the poor in Israel etc.
I wonder if such “grey market” activity concern is more about who makes $Thousands of profit vs the $Millions from major arms transactions? Acquiring and exporting a few hundred of guns vs several thousands of guns “under the radar” must take a lot of baksheesh in many greasy palms.
 
I wonder if such “grey market” activity concern is more about who makes $Thousands of profit vs the $Millions from major arms transactions? Acquiring and exporting a few hundred of guns vs several thousands of guns “under the radar” must take a lot of baksheesh in many greasy palms.
Yes. I should add that Glock is very much bottom dollar focused. Our conversation to become a stocking dealer started with "This is how you'll get in trouble with Glock." Rule #1: don't violate MAP. Rule #2: don't export our guns. We do that as a company and work with selected exporters to fulfill international contracts. From his viewpoint, it's about the money first. If you have an FFL that covers exports, you can do these things - buy large POs from a manufacturer, get your paperwork in order, and ship them internationally. He was also saying how, in Israel, for example, there is the military but then other groups that are non-military but want arms. If you can find someone legitimate (or corrupt) enough in the receiving country to accept the import, you're shipment is really going towards arming paramilitaries.

Being an international arms dealer is on my bucket list. Just not with Glock.
 
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