Striker Fired 1911?

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per the firearm blog.

looks great

15439983_938256646304367_2549922894656592828_n.jpg


http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2016/12/14/potd-hudson-mfg-new-hotness/
 

drgrant

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That isn't a 1911 though. Or at least if they call it that that would be kind of retarded. Maybe they are trying to make skinny full size gun probably cater to the same subset of weirdos that want a skinny Glock 21 Etc. [laugh] although I will admit depending on the circumstances /context that something like that isn't an entirely horrible idea.
 

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Striker Fired 1911?

No, it isn't. I guess they can call it whatever they want. But calling it a 1911 doesn't making it any more true than calling my wife a lingerie model makes her one. It might be a fine firearm, even share some features of a 1911, but it's not.

Those rounds don't look like 45, do they?

Say 9mm on the slide
 

22lr

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I don't see where Hudson is calling it a 1911, seems like click bait from the firearms blog who I would think should know better.

From Hudson's website which is totally millennial-ish:
The research was exhausting. We read everything: print magazines; positive and negative reviews; statistical buying patterns; helpful and inane blog posts. We bought pistols: old and new, took them apart, shot them, put them in everyone’s hands and we asked, “what do you hate?”, “What do you love?”. To start, we wrote our initial concept: striker fired reliability with a single-axis 1911-style trigger.

I am glad that their exhausting research led them to the cnclude that people want a reliable gun with a good trigger. [rofl]
 
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To start, we wrote our initial concept: striker fired reliability
I have not seen any evidence striker fired is any more reliable than hammer fired. I've seen more striker fired guns without enough "ooomph" to wake up the primer than hammer fired, and in general, only the hammer fired DA or DAO guns allow a second pull on a sleepy primer without the need to manually recock (which, on many striker fired guns, is a two handed gun and cannot easily be done without ejecting the round in chamber)
 
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Why do companies like Hudson have to attempt to blend the line between striker fire and 1911?? What a waste of time.
 

Dennis in MA

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Looks like a modern adaptation of a Colt 1903/08.

I've got an 08. Slide closes like a bank vault. I love that sound. While I love my Glocks, that 1908 has to be the coolest gun in my collection to handle.

It could be striker fired. Or not. Who cares? Heck, Para did those double-action "1911's" which went mostly nowhere. (Yes, I might have 2 of those, too. LOL They work well. Just too heavy to bother carrying.)
 
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I have glocks and now 1911's thanks to NES in my collection, so i appreciate both, and maybe its a hammerless like the above poster sai, and hopefully will go better than the remington R1 in the regard.

But it looks like a 1911 grip which is nice
 
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Looks like a modern adaptation of a Colt 1903/08

I've got one as well, in .32acp - sneaky thing is, there's a hammer in there (the 1903 "pocket hammerless), not a striker at all.

I always wondered why the same concept wasn't applied to larger frame pistols, but assumed it was just "pocketability" which is hard to come by in a 5" pistol and nobody made snubby 1911s for quite some time.
 

45collector

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I've got one as well, in .32acp - sneaky thing is, there's a hammer in there (the 1903 "pocket hammerless), not a striker at all.

I always wondered why the same concept wasn't applied to larger frame pistols, but assumed it was just "pocketability" which is hard to come by in a 5" pistol and nobody made snubby 1911s for quite some time.

The Colt 1903 was way ahead of it's time. Excellent little carry gun, albeit in a pathetic caliber. Mine was made in 1911 and while it has plenty of finish wear, mechanically it's perfect and I shoot it occasionally. I hate buying that caliber though. [laugh]
 

Dennis in MA

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We've successfully threadjacked!

The advantage of the 03/08 is definitely draw-ability and flatness. That thing is, like, 3 sheets of paper thick. And with that rounded back and no external hammer, it draws out of pockets better than any revolver short of a Fitz Special. (I might have one of those as well. LOL)

I concur it's too bad that it was never taken to better calibers than 32 and 380. It's a dream to shoot, tho.
 

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i know it's an exception, but isn't the Walther P99 a striker fire that allows a second trigger pull without recocking?
 

JimmyRussell

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They aren't claiming striker fired 1911, they are saying they have combined a striker fired pistol with a single axis 1911 style trigger. Actually quite appealing.
 
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I've got one as well, in .32acp - sneaky thing is, there's a hammer in there (the 1903 "pocket hammerless), not a striker at all.
The term "hammerless" is often misused - for example, there is a hammer in the "hammerless" Jframe S&W 64x series and 44x series of pocket pistols.
 
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I have not seen any evidence striker fired is any more reliable than hammer fired. I've seen more striker fired guns without enough "ooomph" to wake up the primer than hammer fired, and in general, only the hammer fired DA or DAO guns allow a second pull on a sleepy primer without the need to manually recock (which, on many striker fired guns, is a two handed gun and cannot easily be done without ejecting the round in chamber)

Traditional striker fired guns where the trigger pull serves to cock the striker fully tend to hit primers softer than hammer fired guns, but an action like the PPQ (striker fired but true SAO) allows for a harder hit while maintaining a light and crisp trigger pull.

Why do companies like Hudson have to attempt to blend the line between striker fire and 1911?? What a waste of time.

To own USPSA production. I've been saying for years now that a smart company should put the PPQ fire control mechanism into a 1911. You get all the benefits of a 1911 but with production legal striker fired goodness. I'd also get rid of the link and bushing and use a modern style lockup even though it would kill the 1911 profile. Hard to tell but it looks like this gun might do that too.

i know it's an exception, but isn't the Walther P99 a striker fire that allows a second trigger pull without recocking?

Yes.
 
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I don't see where Hudson is calling it a 1911, seems like click bait from the firearms blog who I would think should know better.

From Hudson's website which is totally millennial-ish:


I am glad that their exhausting research led them to the cnclude that people want a reliable gun with a good trigger. [rofl]

They really don't know better. They do it all the time on Facebook, constantly post forum reports as news (Muh gluck blew up)
 
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I'll have to admit, I'm interested to see what they come up with. Some of the brilliance of the 1911 design is the ergonomics. And while lots of guns feature a grip angle similar to a 1911, none of those guns fit my hand like an actual 1911. I have pretty small hands, and a 1911 with thin grips, flat mainspring housing, and a short trigger fits me perfectly. When I handle guns that are designed to feel similar to a 1911, I often wish they felt exactly like a 1911. And they should accept 1911 grip panels so that existing aftermarket grips will fit.

I do understand that people with larger hands might prefer a double stack that feels similar to a 1911, but that is not what I want.
 
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DavidC77

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Hudson has a Count Down going from the link in the story about the gun...

It's roughly 5AM 12/17/2016: ETA_ 023days: 03hrs.: 59mins.: 34secs.


https://www.hudsonmfg.com/ETA/chapters/1-4

I clicked on the square boxes (in the middle of each box and on the upper right to go to 5 - 8) and this is what opened in each:

Box 1: The Question


"How do we re-imagine a pistol?"


Curiosity - a strong desire to know or learn something.

We wonder how? Why? What if? Sometimes these questions set us down unexpected paths; paths that lead to new breakthroughs and allow us to keep advancing.

Circa 2012, we started with a single question: could we design and make a better pistol? That question generated hundreds of thousands of questions that we would ask over the next four years



Box 2: The Challenge


"If it could be done someone would have done it."


Creation - to bring about; arrange, as by intention or design.

There’s no roadmap; no one to guide you. It’s something you have to choose to undertake. There will be doubters, critics, and those who wish you to fail…it’s not for everyone.

From day one, the Hudson H9 was met with reluctance and cynicism. Most dismissed the idea of launching a new product, company and brand in the highly competitive world of firearms. And there were times where we became discouraged, but we knew if we never met opposition then we were not aiming high enough.
Subscribe for Updates


Box 3: The Vision


"We’re going to incorporate the best features into one pistol."


Goal - the end toward which effort is directed.

In a world where the consumer is always right, how do you quantify what people really want?

The research was exhausting. We read everything: print magazines; positive and negative reviews; statistical buying patterns; helpful and inane blog posts. We bought pistols: old and new, took them apart, shot them, put them in everyone’s hands and we asked, “what do you hate?”, “What do you love?”. To start, we wrote our initial concept: striker fired reliability with a single-axis 1911-style trigger.


Box 4: The Brick and the Boat Anchor


"We can’t stop here."


Improve - to advance or make progress in what is desirable.

The most difficult improvements to make are to ourselves and our ideas. When do you know you’re there? When do you push for more?

We worked for a year before we had the first prototype. We named it “The Brick”. It was crude, expensive and barely worked, but it was tangible. So, we pushed ahead. Another year, more research, more work, more coffee. Another prototype was produced - “The Boat Anchor”. We were told we should go to market, but we knew it wasn’t ready. We fought to make it better and won.


Box 5: Rework


"Making it work is half the battle, the other half is looking good."


Vantage Point - a position from which something is viewed or considered.

You can’t expect to see the same thing differently if you continue to look at it in the same manner.

We had a firing prototype. We had the go ahead to make improvements. We told a new group of engineers, “Our baby is ugly, make it better.” We said to keep the essence, but re-imagine it one more time. A thousand more decisions until everyone agreed that it was the pistol that they would want to shoot.


Box 6: Finalizing the Design


"The smallest decision can make the largest impact."


Refine - to improve or perfect by cultivating subtleties or distinctions.

Realizing the significance of details is a crucial step in the pursuit of greatness.

How low is the bore axis? How long do we want the trigger travel? How wide is the grip? How light is the slide? What tolerance on the rails? All these details added up to the final pistol. For three years, we asked “What do you hate?”. We’d asked ourselves and industry experts until people stopped saying they hated anything.


Box 7: Trial by Fire


"This is the flattest shooting gun I have fired without a brake."


Test - a procedure intended to establish the quality, performance, or reliability of something, especially before it is taken into widespread use.

Designing the test is as important as the design itself. You must accept that your idea has to fail multiple times before it can be perfected.

The first round left the chamber and with it all concern vanished. Thanks to the extremely low bore axis, the felt recoil and muzzle rise were virtually imperceptible. All the pieces had finally fallen into place.


Box 8: is Pixeled out


I clicked on the Subscribe Button and this opened:

Follow the Hudson story and be the first to know about the hudson H9.


Hudson is calling their new gun the Hudson H9

This is from Box 3: To start, we wrote our initial concept: striker fired reliability with a single-axis 1911-style trigger.

 
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