Torque wrench recommendation please...

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Looking for a torque wrench (or wrenches) to handle up to 85 in/lbs, basement of 10. Finest adjustment possible.

That range should cover rimfires on up; Ruger American rifles seem to recommend 60-80, which is the highest I've seen, so that should be good.

I looked at the FAT analog wrench but wanted something with finer settings. The digital looks promising, but several reviews says it is nearly impossible to torque the higher settings.

Aaaaand just to make it extra fun, what is easiest on the hands? (Arthritis big time)

This will be used sparingly, so I'd like quality but don't need tools designed for high use over years.

Thanks to all.
 
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I've had a Tekton for a number of years and earlier this month bought a Proto (made in the US!). I haven't used the ol' Tekton that much and the Proto is brand new, so take my advice with a grain of salt; both feel very well made and solid though.
 

mac1911

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i have a 1/4 drive snap on
Its down well BUT make sure you read the accuracy specs.
My snappy goes to 150in lbs IIRC but is only accurate per there specs starting at 20%
So this particuar torque wrench is only really accurate at 30in lbs + They also give several other +/- percent accuracy claims. Basically the higher the max tourqe range the lower the accuracy on the lower torqe range. Something to think about.

CDI torque wrenches are good also. They are owned by snap on now. The CDI branded wrenches will be less money. AFAIK CDI are made in USA.
i have the FAT torque screw driver and it has proven itself about as accurate as needed for firearm stuff. mine looks different so i will need to double check to make sure it is a wheeler?

In the end what do you want to spend?
If your looking for more accuracy on the lower end they do have in oz torque wrenches?
We use the CDI in the shop
 
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Did y'all look at the torque range OP needs? It ranges from finger tight to maybe one grunt on a 1/4" ratchet.

The one I linked goes 12-120 in-lb accurately. OP's range is 10-85 in-lbs.
 

appraiser

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I have an inch pound torque wrench, I can count the number of times I have ever used it.

INCH pounds, 10 inch pounds... the amount of grunt it takes to raise 10 pounds one inch

If you were using a ratchet with a 6" handle, factoring in the lever effect, it is picking up 5 pounds one inch... a gallon of water weighs about 7 pounds...

I use my uncalibrated wrist
 

Obie1

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I'd recommend a Craftsman model 1019 Laboratory edition, signature series torque wrench. The kind used by Cal Tech High Energy physicists, and NASA engineers. They are dead-on balls accurate (it's an industry term).
 

mac1911

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Did y'all look at the torque range OP needs? It ranges from finger tight to maybe one grunt on a 1/4" ratchet.

The one I linked goes 12-120 in-lb accurately. OP's range is 10-85 in-lbs.
Looks like a good unit but see what ai mean about accuracy , maybe I am reading it wrong but it says that 30-65in lb is its “accuracy” zone< I have to take a bit more time to read it.
Then a bit more down it says 6% accuracy for “competition” ? Is
6% ? Now depending on how “accurate” your trying to be 6% of 15in lbs might be to little accuracy for some.
To me “close enough”
I like that wrench. Seems like bolt tpms sensors are going out of style but I like how that wrench works
 

citoriguy

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I picked up a Park Tools torque wrench for bicycle work and it’s been pretty sturdy and dependable. They’re decently priced and may be an option for your needs.
 
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Looks like a good unit but see what ai mean about accuracy , maybe I am reading it wrong but it says that 30-65in lb is its “accuracy” zone< I have to take a bit more time to read it.
Then a bit more down it says 6% accuracy for “competition” ? Is
6% ? Now depending on how “accurate” your trying to be 6% of 15in lbs might be to little accuracy for some.
To me “close enough”
I like that wrench. Seems like bolt tpms sensors are going out of style but I like how that wrench works
"Competition" means competing brand torque wrenches. Meaning, the OTC does 2% accuracy while the competition does 6%. The OTC does 12-120 in-lbs while the competition does 38-66. Agreed it's difficult to understand what they meant.

I mostly used it for transmission pan bolts that were torque to yield at 8NM, and later the spec was 4NM+180 degrees. Other techs would torque by feel but I sometimes found their work uneven and seeping later. If I used a torque wrench, no one could accuse me later of being negligent, and I never had leaks unless I pinched the gasket. I find myself using it now mostly for 14NM intake manifold bolts, but that is really topping it out. Mostly I just want to know that something with a gasket is evenly installed.

I have another torque wrench 50-250 in-lbs and another 20-100 ft-lbs so there's always some overlap.
 

nitsuj

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I’ve learned one thing about torque wrenches, don’t buy cheap ones and take care of them...about 10 years ago I started buying snap on for personal use and haven’t looked back...buy once cry once
 

gxx9sdb

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I have a Tekton and like it. Does what a torque wrench should and I don’t recall it being very expensive
 
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i have a 1/4 drive snap on
Its down well BUT make sure you read the accuracy specs.
My snappy goes to 150in lbs IIRC but is only accurate per there specs starting at 20%
So this particuar torque wrench is only really accurate at 30in lbs + They also give several other +/- percent accuracy claims. Basically the higher the max tourqe range the lower the accuracy on the lower torqe range. Something to think about.

CDI torque wrenches are good also. They are owned by snap on now. The CDI branded wrenches will be less money. AFAIK CDI are made in USA.
i have the FAT torque screw driver and it has proven itself about as accurate as needed for firearm stuff. mine looks different so i will need to double check to make sure it is a wheeler?

In the end what do you want to spend?
If your looking for more accuracy on the lower end they do have in oz torque wrenches?
We use the CDI in the shop
Thanks, that was very useful to know.

I'm wondering if it would be more feasible to get two with overlapping ranges? Say 10-50, 40-100 if that sort of thing exists?

Really what I'm looking for is a torque wrench (or wrenches) that will cover scope mounting up to action screws. I'd like to keep the cost under 150 but can stretch to 200 if needed.
 

pastera

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The variance in the torque wrench is dwarfed by poor thread prep - if the threads (male and female) aren't clean and dry, the torque wrench is useless.

If the joint is lubed (thread locker counts) then the torque needs to be reduced from the dry spec (but the amount varies based on lube and joint configuration)

Buy something decent that will be repeatable if not accurate.
 

greencobra

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I use this on on my motorcycles;
this tekton looks decent for any gun related jobs. i saw amazon had it for $29 yesterday evening. i went to order it today and it's 39. but still decent price for a tool that won't get heavy use.
 

mac1911

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Looking for a torque wrench (or wrenches) to handle up to 85 in/lbs, basement of 10. Finest adjustment possible.

That range should cover rimfires on up; Ruger American rifles seem to recommend 60-80, which is the highest I've seen, so that should be good.

I looked at the FAT analog wrench but wanted something with finer settings. The digital looks promising, but several reviews says it is nearly impossible to torque the higher settings.

Aaaaand just to make it extra fun, what is easiest on the hands? (Arthritis big time)

This will be used sparingly, so I'd like quality but don't need tools designed for high use over years.

Thanks to all.
So i was thinking. Sometimes when I am deciding on "gun products" I fall to Brownells
They have a good track record with me and tend to not carry junk.
Although I think its a bit expensive They carry a wrench made by Seekonk, and I learned they are made in seekonk is based in massachusetts.
Never heard of them or know anything about their products.
Inch Pound Graduations | Torque Gauges | Seekonk
Its funny to find companies in mass you never heard of. I have been buying tools for 35 years or so and never heard about Seekonk ? Same with Lisle tools. Only heard about them in the past 15 years or so.
i have been revisting buying local and trying to buy USA made. So far its not been easy. Especially with the 0ne9

If your going to be mounting alot of scopes maybe a set of the fixed torque T handle type would be better.
So decide one how accurate you want to get.
3% is about the norm for most.

Arthritic hands you most likely dont want a "screw driver" style. So a "wrench style" would suite you better I believe.

again maybe more expensive than you like to see but my dad gave alot of business to these guys.
They dont have it you dont need it
 
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JRT

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Fix it Sticks, I have two Snap On torque wrenches and I have not used them since I bought the Fix it Sticks.

 

mac1911

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Fix it Sticks, I have two Snap On torque wrenches and I have not used them since I bought the Fix it Sticks.

cool set up but their torque limiters bits are $40 each ? theres this one also which I think is nifty but I have enough trouble seeing small things clearly plus its accuracy is at 10%

Always like to see new/different tools
 
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JRT

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cool set up but their torque limiters bits are $40 each ? theres this one also which I think is nifty but I have enough trouble seeing small things clearly plus its accuracy is at 10%

Always like to see new/different tools
They came out with the All-In-One after I bought the individual ones of course. The individual ones are +/- 6%, I'm sure thats not as good as my Snap On but they are so quick and easy. For the stuff I do the 6% is ok for me.
 

mac1911

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They came out with the All-In-One after I bought the individual ones of course. The individual ones are +/- 6%, I'm sure thats not as good as my Snap On but they are so quick and easy. For the stuff I do the 6% is ok for me.
Yes thats what matters “good enough” for me ectect.

I actually have the Weaver (I thought it was wheeler) for home use. I use it for 10-30in-lb . They both have some reported issues on the higher end setting so I move onto my snappy for anything over 35inlbs. Which is not to many things. I think the highest I have is my leopuld mK series AR mount at 65inlbs

Either way I have mot had a screw come loose using the weaver for several years now. Same with any torque ....also you wont see broken screws or stripped heads as often.
 
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