Clarification Needed: Unlicensed Hunting

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Hey everyone,

I've been pondering over a rather thorny issue lately and I'd love to get some insights. What are your thoughts on unlicensed hunting?

Specifically, I'm curious about the ethical and legal ramifications. On the one hand, hunting can be essential for wildlife management, but without proper regulation,

it risks ecological imbalance and animal cruelty. Moreover, there's the matter of safety and fairness for other hunters who abide by the rules.

Do you think stricter penalties or more education would deter unlicensed hunting? How can we strike a balance between conservation and individual rights?

Looking forward to your perspectives!
 
Hey everyone,

I've been pondering over a rather thorny issue lately and I'd love to get some insights. What are your thoughts on unlicensed hunting?

Specifically, I'm curious about the ethical and legal ramifications. On the one hand, hunting can be essential for wildlife management, but without proper regulation,

it risks ecological imbalance and animal cruelty. Moreover, there's the matter of safety and fairness for other hunters who abide by the rules.

Do you think stricter penalties or more education would deter unlicensed hunting? How can we strike a balance between conservation and individual rights?

Looking forward to your perspectives on can i go hunting with someone without a license!
thanks in advance for any help
 
Hey everyone,

I've been pondering over a rather thorny issue lately and I'd love to get some insights. What are your thoughts on unlicensed hunting?

Specifically, I'm curious about the ethical and legal ramifications. On the one hand, hunting can be essential for wildlife management, but without proper regulation,

it risks ecological imbalance and animal cruelty. Moreover, there's the matter of safety and fairness for other hunters who abide by the rules.

Do you think stricter penalties or more education would deter unlicensed hunting? How can we strike a balance between conservation and individual rights?

Looking forward to your perspectives!
Are you a hunter? What problem are you looking to solve?
 
I think for the most part if not 100% you will find folks around here to strongly support ethical hunting and preservation of resources for future generations. Some regulations may be seen as overbearing and actually cruel to game animals if the ban on hunting combined with a lack of natural predation causes that population to grow out of control, leading to starvation and/or disease.
 
So there is no one-size-fits-all solution or situation.
But laws and regulations are just that, one size for all.
So we do the best we can and have to accept that something will come up that just doesn't fit, and we will have to deal with that when it happens.

OP what problem are you looking to fix?
 
Hey everyone,

I've been pondering over a rather thorny issue lately and I'd love to get some insights. What are your thoughts on unlicensed hunting?

Specifically, I'm curious about the ethical and legal ramifications. On the one hand, hunting can be essential for wildlife management, but without proper regulation,

it risks ecological imbalance and animal cruelty. Moreover, there's the matter of safety and fairness for other hunters who abide by the rules.

Do you think stricter penalties or more education would deter unlicensed hunting? How can we strike a balance between conservation and individual rights?

Looking forward to your perspectives!
How much unlicensed hunting do you think is happening? If homeless and/or destitute people were killing animals to survive, I doubt the numbers would even hurt an animal population.
 
hunters safety is already free,
the only reason not to get a license in your home state is if you can't afford it.
but seriuosly, if you are too broke to pay for the license you likely can't buy the gun, bow, bullets, or arrows to then hunt. or the tools to properly prepare and eat your kill.

heroin and a cheeseburger is like 5 bucks. why hunt?

and who are you gonna hunt with? a bunch of other knuckleheads who don't have licenses? You really think a licensed guy is going to go on a hunt with a guy illegaly? why would they do that?

just like you can hop in a car and drive without a license, yes you can get a weapon and go try to harvest a kill. Doesn't mean you should. and they effort/cost to do it legally is minimal.
 
Hey everyone,

I've been pondering over a rather thorny issue lately and I'd love to get some insights. What are your thoughts on unlicensed hunting?

Specifically, I'm curious about the ethical and legal ramifications. On the one hand, hunting can be essential for wildlife management, but without proper regulation,

it risks ecological imbalance and animal cruelty. Moreover, there's the matter of safety and fairness for other hunters who abide by the rules.

Do you think stricter penalties or more education would deter unlicensed hunting? How can we strike a balance between conservation and individual rights?

Looking forward to your perspectives!
Any parcel of land along with its natural flora can only sustain a certain number of game animals. Some land has no feed, and some has an abundance of feed. The animals are going to seek their own place and no amount of government interference is ever going to change that unless 18 foot high fences were erected and 100% sealed off an area.

In areas (states) where the majority of land is under private ownership, those landowners along with the natural food chain, do a very good job of managing and balancing the resident wildlife.

Here in Kentucky, as a landowner, I don't have to buy a hunting license to hunt my own property, nor would any family member who actually resided on my property.
Anyone else who hunted here would have to buy a hunting license.

I (and many others) have far exceeded my "conservation burden" in providing excellent habitat and food for the wildlife that resides here......like $15 dollars......X100 annually. I have a deer herd numbering a consistent 16 to 20 that hangs around here. Plenty of food, flowing water and cover. No fences, natural predation by coyotes, but they manage and thrive. I boost their chances with year 'round managed feeding.

Subsistence hunting is pretty much gone by the wayside, even in the poorest places. Sure, people will supplement their food supply but those who are fully dependent on the land are very few and far between.

The biggest intrusion on wildlife are those who buy several acres, clear cut it and then build a McMansion, thereby driving off the former resident wildlife.

Hunting licenses are just a money/tax scheme. In most instances, whenever government gets involved in the issue, they ruin it for everyone.
 
Someone can correct me if I'm wrong on this.
In New Hampshire you can kill an animal that is threatening your crops if the land is zoned agricultural.
Your land your crops or domestic animals.
So deer, rabbits, squirrels, fox, weasels, rats, coyotes, etc.
I don't think that means you can bait the lot to draw them in and then "hunt" them without a permit.
 
hunters safety is already free,
the only reason not to get a license in your home state is if you can't afford it.
but seriuosly, if you are too broke to pay for the license you likely can't buy the gun, bow, bullets, or arrows to then hunt. or the tools to properly prepare and eat your kill.

heroin and a cheeseburger is like 5 bucks. why hunt?

and who are you gonna hunt with? a bunch of other knuckleheads who don't have licenses? You really think a licensed guy is going to go on a hunt with a guy illegaly? why would they do that?

just like you can hop in a car and drive without a license, yes you can get a weapon and go try to harvest a kill. Doesn't mean you should. and they effort/cost to do it legally is minimal.
Not to mention, who’s going to process the animal?
No butcher will touch it without a tag, and not everyone knows how to skin & cut. I’m referring to deer, birds are obviously a different story.
 
Not to mention, who’s going to process the animal?
No butcher will touch it without a tag, and not everyone knows how to skin & cut. I’m referring to deer, birds are obviously a different story.
Most any poacher already knows how to process a deer. Lots of them will cut the prime cuts out in the field and leave the rest on the ground.
That draws in coyotes and in the spring/summer when the new fawns are being born, that is not a good situation.
 
Specifically, I'm curious about the ethical and legal ramifications.
Do you think a license makes one ethical? Read, hang out at clubs, forums, or check in stations and listen to the stories of "hunters" shooting before/after legal light then smugly dragging the carcass out of the woods. Lots of other stories like this. They think the license will provide cover for them skirting the laws that the other 98% are following. The proverbially "ill-gotten gains".
 
Hey everyone,

I've been pondering over a rather thorny issue lately and I'd love to get some insights. What are your thoughts on unlicensed hunting?
What is the specific question you are trying to answer and the use of the information supplied?
Is this for personal knowledge, a class assignment or an article?
If for an article, who is the publisher?
Specifically, I'm curious about the ethical and legal ramifications.
Legal ramifications for hunting without the proper hunting license (poaching) are outlined in Mass Statutes.
Ethical questions are quite open to discussion since the answer depends on the ethical question
Are you asking if the unlicensed taking of game is ethical if the game was injured or diseased? If so, that's an entirely different ethical question than taking a deer out of season with a rim fire rifle.
On the one hand, hunting can be essential for wildlife management, but without proper regulation,
it risks ecological imbalance and animal cruelty. Moreover, there's the matter of safety and fairness for other hunters who abide by the rules.
Define "proper regulation"
I would say that hunters are much more interested in the proper management of herds than the government. This is especially true of Mass hunting regulations regarding nighttime hunting which force the use of insufficient cartridges.

Do you think stricter penalties or more education would deter unlicensed hunting? How can we strike a balance between conservation and individual rights?

Looking forward to your perspectives!
Stricter penalties won't deter those that knowingly poach.

Education - Allowing the Hunter Safety course to be offered in schools would go a long way toward educating people on the necessity of hunting for ethical and human herd management AND help reduce firearms accidents.

As far as balancing conservation with individual rights, I believe you are conflating two very different areas
Wildlife is a public resource therefore well within the government's purview to effectively manage.

If your question of individual rights is geared towards firearms ownership then you need to review the Heller opinion and the literature around it. The right to keep and bear arms is not a right tied to hunting or target practice but an all encompassing right to all lawful purposes a person would care to partake of while armed with those items within the definition of bearable arms called out in Heller
Justice Scalia said:
We know of no other enumerated constitutional right whose core protection has been subjected to a freestanding “interest-balancing” approach. The very enumeration of the right takes out of the hands of government—even the Third Branch of Government—the power to decide on a case-by-case basis whether the right is really worth insisting upon. A constitutional guarantee subject to future judges’ assessments of its usefulness is no constitutional guarantee at all.
Justice Scalia said:
Some have made the argument, bordering on the frivolous, that only those arms in existence in the 18th century are protected by the Second Amendment. We do not interpret constitutional rights that way. Just as the First Amendment protects modern forms of communications, e.g., Reno v. American Civil Liberties Union, 521 U. S. 844, 849 (1997), and the Fourth Amendment applies to modern forms of search, e.g., Kyllo v. United States, 533 U. S. 27, 35–36 (2001), the Second Amendment extends, prima facie, to all instruments that constitute bearable arms, even those that were not in existence at the time of the founding.
 
"animal cruelty" is the ID that all you really need to know.
Agree
There is no death other than a painfully cruel death in nature - Animals die from predation, starvation or sickness in the wild.

A harvested animal is killed in the most efficient and painless manner allowed by law to the hunters - The vast majority of hunters care deeply about the suffering of animals and even those that don't want a fast, effective harvest so they don't have to track a wounded animal.
 
In my state any non game animal can be hunted without a license. For example, gophers. My buddy called me yesterday and asked me to go on his land and shoot a many as possible as soon as possible.
I swear 'everyone' had a .22-250 out there in the 80s and 90s for this reason. Set up the table, these days a tri-pod, at the edge of the field and shoot til lunch. [thumbsup]
An example;

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=40MjBfxIZlU&t=1s
 
Account goes back a few years with basic questions on various topics - either a lurker or a very well curated sock puppet.
More likely a lurker
I'm still not sure they're not a really odd form of trolling. this one has asked a handful of really weird questions. if so, credit for at least being kind of creative/amusing.
 
Agree
There is no death other than a painfully cruel death in nature - Animals die from predation, starvation or sickness in the wild.

A harvested animal is killed in the most efficient and painless manner allowed by law to the hunters - The vast majority of hunters care deeply about the suffering of animals and even those that don't want a fast, effective harvest so they don't have to track a wounded animal.
I'm an old SOB. A young lady once asked me if I harvested animals and I said no, I kill them.
 
Well killing them is a good first step in the harvesting process - they usually don't respond well to a polite request to get in the freezer.
Wait, that explain a lot. I'll try it this way next time.
 
The main hunting “problem” that we have in Massachusetts is that we don’t have enough hunters and we don’t have enough land in eastern MA to hunt. As a result, we are overpopulated with deer.

As for hunting safety, the most important way to improve hunting safety is for hunters to wear a high quality harness and safety line while in a treestand.
 
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