General Mini 14 Thread

NickLeduc

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Bored with your mini 14? Consider sending it out to Carl at Accuracy Systems in Byers CO. What used to be a plain jane 580 series mini 14 is now a work of art. Have not yet put groups on paper, but on steel most rounds are touching at 100 yards. Then again with this barrel is should be accurate. Took ~5 months and some $$ but well worth it!

-Match grade 416 stainless barrel, 223 wylde, 1:9 twist, 18", 0.850 diameter
-11 degree target crown
-fluted barrel including under handguard
-custom handguard
-aluminum gas block
-trigger job, 3.5#
-ASI target stock with flat forend
-3 point steel bedding into stock
-operating rod re-fitted
-extra power guide spring and shock buffer

Hornady 55gr V-max, 3 shot group 0.816" at 100 yards
Definitely a sharp looking rifle. Do you know how much extra weight was added to it after the mods?
 

92G

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Definitely a sharp looking rifle. Do you know how much extra weight was added to it after the mods?
haven't weighed it although the only heavier part is the barrel and stock. the aluminum gas block is actually lighter than OEM steel. for a lighter weight build he can do a barrel w 16" length and 0.750" profile. that will still add some weight compared to OEM but not too much.

he wanted to do something like a 1" bull profile and 20 or 22" length which would have been crazy heavy. i get the feeling the builder is an accuracy nut.
 

amm5061

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Damn that looks nice! Accuracy Systems has had a good reputation of getting the most out of a Mini for awhile now. I've got some of their parts in mine.

That really makes me want to send mine in!
 
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mac1911

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haven't weighed it although the only heavier part is the barrel and stock. the aluminum gas block is actually lighter than OEM steel. for a lighter weight build he can do a barrel w 16" length and 0.750" profile. that will still add some weight compared to OEM but not too much.

he wanted to do something like a 1" bull profile and 20 or 22" length which would have been crazy heavy. i get the feeling the builder is an accuracy nut.
DUDE, no muzzle brake, how to you get your shots back on target.
Looks good, thats some coin into a rifle for sure but no worse than the folks that dump $1000 into thier 10/22s.
I like the looks of it. i hope it pays off on the accuracy end.

side note, im not a fan of brakes especially on small cal rifles that really dont need them. i also think a brake on this will ruin its good looks
 
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92G

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DUDE, no muzzle brake, how to you get your shots back on target.
Looks good, thats some coin into a rifle for sure but no worse than the folks that dump $1000 into thier 10/22s.
I like the looks of it. i hope it pays off on the accuracy end.

side note, im not a fan of brakes especially on small cal rifles that really dont need them. i also think a brake on this will ruin its good looks
you should see me shoot a 223 without a brake. muzzle is all over the place. nonstop flinching. painful to watch. /sarcasm

the primary reason for no muzzle brake was aesthetics and cost. i wanted to keep my build from getting retarded expensive so i went with barrel fluting instead of muzzle threading (IIRC it was around the same in cost). the fluting looks incredible and maybe adds a wee bit to the function. the total cost of work done by accuracy systems was around $1400. not cheap. however it's a custom rifle, built to my specifications, top notch parts including barrel, and cannot be purchased in any shops. in terms of function it is still out-done by any AR build with a high quality barrel. but something about the mini 14...even though it's sort of a POS the thing tickles my feather.

the biggest "danger" to these custom builds is how much they lose in potential resale value. so for this reason I am cautious to avoid these types of projects unless i'm dang sure to be keeping the thing.
 

SKumar

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I've been giving this rifle a lot of shit, but honestly, it's a pretty good rifle. The trigger is probably the best Ruger has ever made. I just realized I have the Tactical version: 16" barrel with a birdcage flash suppressor and polymer stock.
 
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I've been giving this rifle a lot of shit, but honestly, it's a pretty good rifle. The trigger is probably the best Ruger has ever made. I just realized I have the Tactical version: 16" barrel with a birdcage flash suppressor and polymer stock.
Now that you mention it.... the trigger is pretty damn nice on mine as well. Mine is stock wood/blued 18" barrell
 

mac1911

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you should see me shoot a 223 without a brake. muzzle is all over the place. nonstop flinching. painful to watch. /sarcasm

the primary reason for no muzzle brake was aesthetics and cost. i wanted to keep my build from getting retarded expensive so i went with barrel fluting instead of muzzle threading (IIRC it was around the same in cost). the fluting looks incredible and maybe adds a wee bit to the function. the total cost of work done by accuracy systems was around $1400. not cheap. however it's a custom rifle, built to my specifications, top notch parts including barrel, and cannot be purchased in any shops. in terms of function it is still out-done by any AR build with a high quality barrel. but something about the mini 14...even though it's sort of a POS the thing tickles my feather.

the biggest "danger" to these custom builds is how much they lose in potential resale value. so for this reason I am cautious to avoid these types of projects unless i'm dang sure to be keeping the thing.
You made the best point one can make.
"I , Me, Mine, wanted, like ..... Thats all that matters.
As far as "yours" its darn good looking and will agree a brake would ruin it....
 
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I posted this in another thread, but figured I’d showboat my mini here too:

Tech sights, Cogburn Arsenal stripper clip guide, Choate Machine Tool ventilated handguard, Accu-Strut, Cogburn Arsenal M1A/M14 pin on dovetail sight base, Smith Industries Tritium M1A bar sight, John Masen post 580 series pin on muzzle brake, Wilson Combat 1911 buffer at the rear of the operating rod, and an Accuracy Systems Inc reduced gas bushing. Pretty much made it a 5.56 M1A out of boredom.

Brake is secured with green Loctite and a longer roll pin to the new sight base. If I ever wanted to swap out the stock for a fixed pistol grip type I'd be able to remove the entire muzzle device assembly (tap out the roll pin to slide off) and add the factory sight back or a new dovetail base (without the brake loctited to it) to maintain AWB compliance. The Tritium sight is a wider blade and easier on the eyes. I don't expect to ever shoot this rifle further than 100 yards anyway.


As you can see the sight, base, and brake all match, but the bluing is different than the barrel.


Tech-Sight has taller protective ears and the stripper clip guide is a nice matte finish well below the field of vision.

Tech-Sight aperture and adjustment is leaps and bounds above the stock sights.
 
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Rocco Mozz

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Hey guys I've got a bit of a dilemma here. I just got my Mini-14 back from Ruger in NH and they ended up fixing my extractor and a few other things that I've posted in another related thread, all the details are here but most of you guys are probably sick of this by now so I'll just post the link: I plan to send my Mini-14 to Accuracy Systems...what can I legally have them do? .

They were nice enough to include a wooden stock with a thin rubber pad. However, I like my folding stock with the pistol grip and I was informed by a customer service representative that they were unable to fix the crack in the wooden part of the stock. I will take a better picture of it later to show where it is also cracked on the inside. Since the folks at the factory were unable to fix it, I am wondering where I can turn to try and fix this. Is wood filler effective? Would cerakoting over it seal it until the cerakote degraded? Is it worth the hassle? Gunbroker lists folding stocks at $600...I definitely ruled that out. Please let me know what you all think when you have the chance.
 

citoriguy

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Hey guys I've got a bit of a dilemma here. I just got my Mini-14 back from Ruger in NH and they ended up fixing my extractor and a few other things that I've posted in another related thread, all the details are here but most of you guys are probably sick of this by now so I'll just post the link: I plan to send my Mini-14 to Accuracy Systems...what can I legally have them do? .

They were nice enough to include a wooden stock with a thin rubber pad. However, I like my folding stock with the pistol grip and I was informed by a customer service representative that they were unable to fix the crack in the wooden part of the stock. I will take a better picture of it later to show where it is also cracked on the inside. Since the folks at the factory were unable to fix it, I am wondering where I can turn to try and fix this. Is wood filler effective? Would cerakoting over it seal it until the cerakote degraded? Is it worth the hassle? Gunbroker lists folding stocks at $600...I definitely ruled that out. Please let me know what you all think when you have the chance.
Is the crack you're referring to the one in post #30 of the linked thread? If so, that doesn't look too bad. I personally would just leave it to preserve the originality of the gun, but if you want to fix it, you could use a filler and lightly sand with a high grit paper when dry. Maybe put something on it to preserve the fix. If there's play in that area, you could try an epoxy and clamp it for a couple days and see if that works.
 
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Rocco Mozz

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Is the crack you're referring to the one in post #30 of the linked thread? If so, that doesn't look to bad. I personally would just leave it to preserve the originality of the gun, but if you want to fix it, you could use a filler and lightly sand with a high grit paper when dry. Maybe put something on it to preserve the fix. If there's play in that area, you could try an epoxy and clamp it for a couple days and see if that works.
It is the same crack, correct. I would tend to agree with you and want to leave it to preserve the originality, but once I take a picture of the inside of the stock it may change your opinion. The good news is there is no play in the actual area so it feels pretty sturdy and the mantra "if it's not broken don't fix it" should probably be followed in this case.
 

mac1911

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haven't weighed it although the only heavier part is the barrel and stock. the aluminum gas block is actually lighter than OEM steel. for a lighter weight build he can do a barrel w 16" length and 0.750" profile. that will still add some weight compared to OEM but not too much.

he wanted to do something like a 1" bull profile and 20 or 22" length which would have been crazy heavy. i get the feeling the builder is an accuracy nut.
or is sitting on several 22" bull barrels.
 
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Rocco Mozz

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Here are the pictures of the stock crack removed from the rifle. You can see the crack goes all the way in the inside as well.
 

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92G

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likely it was a snug fit of the stock to the action and trigger group with some contraction of the wood leading to it splitting. if the purpose is to be a collector rifle i would leave it alone and do nothing. if the purpose is to shoot the rifle then would swap over a hogue stock, which I normally do not like but their mini 14 stock is excellent. Hold on to the stock. Even with a crack it will hold value again because its an original and a collector may not care so much about the crack. any repairs that are done will almost certainly detract from the collectibility. if the rifle is a 18x-xxx series (i.e not a current production 580 series) i would not dick it up too much or send it out for custom work by Accuracy Systems. the 18x-xxx productions have a superior ejection system and sights. also aftermarket stocks are different given the distinct barrel profiles. if building a product mini 14 a current production gun is a better starting point, as they have no collector value or nostalgia. then again this is advice from a mini 14 enthusiast not a tinfoil prepper or tactical tard ;)

--

current production 583 series in an OD green hogue stock
ultimak railed handguard
vortex venom although it's been replaced with a holosun 2 MOA dot that is holding up just fine despite fairly harsh forward recoil impulse from this action
I run a slightly smaller gas bushing from Accuracy Systems (0.065") to help it cycle the way it should from the factory
with wolf gold 55gr it will reliably make hits out to 300 yards on an 8 inch plate, which is as much as one can expect from a 2-3 MOA rifle.
with ruger barrels one is always rolling the dice since half the time the bore is nowhere near concentric to the OD, so if one is looking to "accurize" then Carl at Accuracy Systems will turn one's mini 14 into a whole different creature

IMG_4861.JPG


IMG_4862.JPG
 
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citoriguy

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As long as there’s nothing funky going on with the firing group, I’d leave it. That doesn’t scare me if it’s still tight. The larger question is what your plans are with it, especially considering you received a new stock. If there’s any component whatsoever of collectibility/history to it, don’t touch it, as 92G points out.
 

Rocco Mozz

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I kind of like the pistol grip for rapid firing but since I was running into cycling issues the problem may have been how I was mistreating the rifle by firing too rapidly in the first place. Although 92G does not have a pistol grip and it looks like that rifle could definitely rapid fire...so I guess I should stick with the stock as is and keep the folding stock as a collectors item.
 

Wildweasel

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It is fixable get some brownells acraglass and open the crack (take the metal off) and run a little into it and then clamp. wipe off excess and let harden. you can also cross pin it if you want with a threaded brass rod. done right you won't see it from the outside. I would do it . it is not a uber rare collectible.
I have had a few of these folders. fix it ,use it. cracked it is not a collectible stock just usable for the metal parts.
 

Rocco Mozz

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Thank you guys for your input. I also wanted to confirm that having a gunsmith cerakote over the crack would be a crappy idea because a. it most likely wouldn't reinforce the actual crack and b. because that's just the wrong way to go about it. In other words: Is cerakote only used as a protective enamel and never as a repairing measure?
 

92G

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cerakote wouldnt work on wood for multiple reasons and wouldnt provide any structural support. its basically a ceramic enamel that cures onto alloys or steel. if done well provides a solid layer of corrosion protection although nothing in my book comes close to Beretta’s primitive Bruniton finish.

i agree w @Wildweasel your best route is probably cleaning it up and using a glass bedding material to structurally address the crack. the trickiest part (at least I think) would be opening up the crack without destroying the stock. if the crack is super thin would it be worth widening it with a dremel to have space for the glass? its an interesting project I think weasel is on the right track but you might enlist a smith for the project assuming its important to you. if going solo consider practicing on some 2x4 wood first.
 

Rocco Mozz

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cerakote wouldnt work on wood for multiple reasons and wouldnt provide any structural support. its basically a ceramic enamel that cures onto alloys or steel. if done well provides a solid layer of corrosion protection although nothing in my book comes close to Beretta’s primitive Bruniton finish.

i agree w @Wildweasel your best route is probably cleaning it up and using a glass bedding material to structurally address the crack. the trickiest part (at least I think) would be opening up the crack without destroying the stock. if the crack is super thin would it be worth widening it with a dremel to have space for the glass? its an interesting project I think weasel is on the right track but you might enlist a smith for the project assuming its important to you. if going solo consider practicing on some 2x4 wood first.
That makes a lot of sense now (concerning the cerakote). I wish I had carpentry class in high school and not just in middle school, because this definitely sounds like a project that is way above my pay grade.
 

citoriguy

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Couldn’t you use a dropper and “inject” the filler into the crack, thereby taking out any risk that Dremel usage would create? It may not penetrate all the way in, but if it gets in deep enough, then it may work.
 

Wildweasel

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You can preheat the bedding compound (this makes it like water) and No bedding filler and just spread the crack as much as you feel safe and use a dropper to drop it in. let it flow as much as possible and then clamp. if it isn't cracked all the way through drill a small hole at the end of the crack. with a good stock like the OP's no need to hog it out. with a greasy surplus stock maybe.

No surface treatment will repair the crack properly (paint) and for Gods sake NO SUPER GLUE. Makes the correct repair impossible.

Looking at the pics a repair will be easy. it is cracked all the way back, you should just be able to spread the crack open a little, (just enough to run the bedding compound in) by using a small wooden wedge to spread it. If you want you can take all the metal off the stock mail it to me (or drive out to northampton area) and I will fix it for you. should only take 15- 20 mins

I have repaired many stocks and never had any issues.
 

Rocco Mozz

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You can preheat the bedding compound (this makes it like water) and No bedding filler and just spread the crack as much as you feel safe and use a dropper to drop it in. let it flow as much as possible and then clamp. if it isn't cracked all the way through drill a small hole at the end of the crack. with a good stock like the OP's no need to hog it out. with a greasy surplus stock maybe.

No surface treatment will repair the crack properly (paint) and for Gods sake NO SUPER GLUE. Makes the correct repair impossible.

Looking at the pics a repair will be easy. it is cracked all the way back, you should just be able to spread the crack open a little, (just enough to run the bedding compound in) by using a small wooden wedge to spread it. If you want you can take all the metal off the stock mail it to me (or drive out to northampton area) and I will fix it for you. should only take 15- 20 mins

I have repaired many stocks and never had any issues.
I think in a month or so I will take you up on that offer.
 
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mac1911

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You can preheat the bedding compound (this makes it like water) and No bedding filler and just spread the crack as much as you feel safe and use a dropper to drop it in. let it flow as much as possible and then clamp. if it isn't cracked all the way through drill a small hole at the end of the crack. with a good stock like the OP's no need to hog it out. with a greasy surplus stock maybe.

No surface treatment will repair the crack properly (paint) and for Gods sake NO SUPER GLUE. Makes the correct repair impossible.

Looking at the pics a repair will be easy. it is cracked all the way back, you should just be able to spread the crack open a little, (just enough to run the bedding compound in) by using a small wooden wedge to spread it. If you want you can take all the metal off the stock mail it to me (or drive out to northampton area) and I will fix it for you. should only take 15- 20 mins

I have repaired many stocks and never had any issues.
This probably the best way, I had a M1a stock with some heavy cracks. When I brought to local furniture repair guy he actually suggested completing the split so you can get it nice and wide/clean and full glue contact. He no longer does stock work and basically stopped doing wood repairs to make wood bowls. Old timer.

he did hook me up with brass pins as he said it would be better If I plan to shoot it. Which I do
I warmed the glass and used a vacuum to pull it through a bit more.

when it comes to nice clean wood repairs if you have not done any practice a bit or find someone with experience. I like to try myself but for pretty work I will seek skilled people

 
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