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Ultimate Survival Knife

Discussion in 'Survival Forum' started by ShadeWPI, Sep 25, 2009.

  1. Executive

    Executive NES Member

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  2. Coyote33

    Coyote33

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    The SOG, Cold Steel, and a few others are all pretty good, and of course the KaBar. I really like the looks of that Bark River, and am going to check it out a little closer. The Polkowski is handsome, but I imagine you pay a premium for the designer name.

    I actually bought an Al Mar SERE folding knife, but thought it too big for EDC, and got the Benchmade AFCK instead. I really liked that knife, but it was just B-I-G big, plus I like the hole opener better than the pencil eraser. To me, it is a better design to lighten it and have less "snagability", and I was used to the hole from a previous Spyderco. I bet the fixed blade one is awesome.

    I am leaning more toward the Benchmade Nimravus, and just now found a fixed blade Griptilian:
    http://www.benchmade.com/products/140
    http://www.benchmade.com/products/151
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2009
  3. syntax

    syntax

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    When I was born my father bought me a Gerber A425 knife, 4.5" chrome plated M2 tool steel, full tang, aluminum handle with "armorhide" grip. I still have the paperwork that shows he paid about $35 for it, including the leather sheath. It's a great knife and holds a hair popping edge longer than any other knife I've ever used. It's too bad they don't make them anymore because I think it's pretty close to an indestructible knife.
    (Picture not mine, but very similar)
    [​IMG]

    I've always known I would do the same for my son. Since Gerber was sold to Fiskars their quality has obviously suffered. I thought about getting a LMFII, cold steel SRK, Becker B2 campanion (now made by Ka-bar), a Ranger R4 (now made by Ontario), SOG seal pup, Falkniven A1, BRKT Bravo 1, etc. etc. etc.

    I finally decided since it's going to be an heirloom piece I might as well go all out and get something that I know he will appreciate in about 15 years. It's a little heavy to be considered "ultimate survival" and 0.22" thick of INFI steel might be a little overkill, but I know it will perform when called upon.

    Busse's latest offering, the Tank Buster

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The best part is that when I told my Dad, he offered to get a sheath made for it for his next birthday! Sweet.

    Good luck with your search for the "ultimate"!
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2009
  4. ShadeWPI

    ShadeWPI

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    I really like that knife. I don't think 0.22" thick is a "bad" thing. It might be a touch heavy, but I would rather have a little extra weight with a thick blade able to serve a chopping function than a thinner and lighter blade.

    I actually like the "Rambo IV" design of a plain piece of metal, slightly curve w/ a cord wrapped handle, but I've never been able to find that design in a good metal (S6 - High Impact Silicon-Carbon Tool Steel would be great) or without the Rambo trademark and inflated price.

    Where did you get the "tank buster"?
     
  5. syntax

    syntax

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    www.bussecombat.com

    The TB is their latest offering, they only put up one "production" model at a time and when they cloe sales, they might never offer it again. All part of the collectors game.
    Google busse, scrapyard, swamprat. . . They are all the same family. I think my next knife will be a scrapyard in either INFI or S7
     
  6. J. Brum

    J. Brum

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    those are some pretty cool looking knives you guys have posted!
    here is my rendition of a survival/field knife...
    Joe

    [​IMG]
     
  7. syntax

    syntax

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    Nice blade. Is it yours? What are the specs?
     
  8. J. Brum

    J. Brum

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    Thank you!
    yes, it's one i made...
    that one was made from 5/32" stock s-30v steel
    approx 6 1/2" blade and just a tad under 12" overall
    compound grinds,false top edge,fullers, and hand checkered thumbrest
    thanks :)
    Joe
     
  9. syntax

    syntax

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    Very cool. The scales look like canvas micarta. Did you make those too?
     
  10. J. Brum

    J. Brum

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    good eye!
    yep, green canvas micarta scales,
    and i also did a little mill work on those also...
    thank you
    Joe
     
  11. ShadeWPI

    ShadeWPI

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    J Brum,

    Gorgeous knife. I'm a little curious about the two different edge angles. Is there a specific reason for that configuration?

    Is the edge angle at the actual edge different for the two sections?

    Also, does the false edge wide enough at the back to allow your palm to apply leverage to the blade for heavy cutting?
     
  12. Chrisg67

    Chrisg67

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    great looking knife! and a good story [grin]

    its sad isnt it :( luckily i got my RD4.5 when it was still made by Justin

    great choice, Busse's are mean knives!
     
  13. J. Brum

    J. Brum

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    the actual cutting "edge"
    on both grinds are pretty close,
    the compound grinds(aside from looking cool)
    does give the blade a bit more heft for chopping and
    more forward momentum,also added tip strength...
    the false edge was also left thicker for that very reason (palming/batton)
    after a few times out in the field working with different knives,
    is what led me into designing this one to suit MY needs [smile]
    thank you sir!
    Joe
     
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  14. ShadeWPI

    ShadeWPI

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    Yeah, I have a friend who has a custom built knife he designed himself from the ground up. He's a material science guy, so the metal is a custom alloy he developed. If I recall, it's a pretty exotic tungsten-steel alloy with lots of other metals to a lessor degree. It's about 12" in total length, 1/4" thick. It has a tanto style tip and the blade is wider than the grip (slightly)

    The main edge is 25 degrees and serves mainly as a chopping edge (it's heavy enough to serve as a makeshift hatchet) while the tanto point edge is honed at 20 degrees and the lower edge (where the blade widens from the handle) is only 17 degrees for more kitchen like work.

    he's driven main blade into a tree-trunk and used it as a step before
     
  15. Chrisg67

    Chrisg67

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    +1 for building your own knife, that is really cool [grin]

    someday when i get a belt sander, i will, attempt it myself. started making a spring steel blade, but had nothing to cut a proper grind into it. [thinking]
     
  16. Underwhere

    Underwhere

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    I'm looking to get one for me and my little sister.

    At first I was looking at the SOG seal pup and then now I'm looking at the Fallkniven F1.

    I can get the SOG for about 60 each and the F1 for 120 each

    Recommendations?

    Mike-Mike your inbox is full by the way
     
  17. Coyote33

    Coyote33

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  18. Chrisg67

    Chrisg67

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    6inch blade is huge. might be good for chopping...but i wouldnt want to take that to a rabbit or trout hahaha
     
  19. glostamon

    glostamon NES Member

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    Pics?...... or it did'nt happen
     
  20. ShadeWPI

    ShadeWPI

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    Glosta,

    Sorry, I don't have pics as it's not my knife. Believe what you will.
     
  21. atmay

    atmay NES Member

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    Just so you know....Mr Brum happens to be a kick-ass professional knifemaker. Mike Spangler is another one who pops up around NES from time to time.



    As for my "ultimate survival knife" I keep a Strider SMF with me at all times, and when I venture into the woods I typically augment it with either a hatchet or 10" bowie.
     
  22. JRyan

    JRyan

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    Would my benchmade rukus count? or is this a fixed blade only type thing?
     
  23. ShadeWPI

    ShadeWPI

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    While some may feel that a folder is an "ultimate survival knife" I don't like the potential failure of the hinge, which is inherently weaker than a fixed blade.

    Don't get my wrong, I carry a Kershaw folder in my backpocket everyday (except when I'm traveling for work and can't due to local legal restrictions) and folders can be great knives.
    For a survival knife, I prefere a solid, full-tang (length and width) knife. A full tang allows the user to use the knife even if the handle fails.

    In survival you want items to be as reliable and multi-functional as practical so you can keep your total load down.

    Just thought, anyone have a knife with a 1/4" hex cut-out so you can use stanard screw-driver tips with the knife? There should be more than enough meat in the body/spine of these heavy knives for that kind of cut-out without sacrificing blade integrity.
    I have a pocket kit with a double ended right angle driver (shaped like an L with 1/4" hex sockets on both ends) but combinding that into a knife might be useful.
     
  24. J. Brum

    J. Brum

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    ShadeWPI,

    I'll post up a pic tommorow of a tool/ knife i make that somewhat fits that bill...
    its what i call a tac-tool, but i have an idea that i would like to add to it...

    i also agree, that a dedicated survival knife should be a fixed blade, just for the strength issues... but with that said, a GOOD quality folder, can get you out of trouble... heck, why not have both![grin]
    Joe
     
  25. Turbocharged

    Turbocharged

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    I figured I'd throw my opinion into the pot.
    I don't have a "hard-core survival knife", but I do have a knife that will meet the demand of the majority of situations.
    It's a folder, which is why I say it's not a "hard core survival knife".
    It's the Kershaw Ken Onion Storm II.
    Half serated, frame lock safety. I like it because it's very thin, easily concealable (yeah, I know concealing a knife isn't that hard, but it does so without discomfort).
    I took some really bad pictures of my knives, it's the second largest one (second to last on the right [and I know the last one is a piece of crap; but it only cost $2]).
     

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    Last edited: Oct 7, 2009
  26. ShadeWPI

    ShadeWPI

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    Brum,

    I agree that a good folder can really get you out of a jam and can be extremely useful. As I said, I keep one in my pocket everyday, except when I can't due to work travel. - My job occationally sends me to the far reaches of the Earth (Japan, China, Malaysia, all over US, Europe, etc) where carrying even a folding knife can invite police scrutiny.

    Also, in a survival situation, I wouldn't discard any tool unless weight, space, carrying capacity required it.

    I'd love to see the design you're refering to.
     
  27. JRyan

    JRyan

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    I have that axis lock on the rukus, seems as close as I can get to a fixed and carry it around everywhere.

    I'd love to see more of your work too BTW. In my layman's opinion anyway, it looks really top notch.
     
  28. jmjkd

    jmjkd Instructor

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    Survival Knife??/ Is this your only tool? or do you have saws, skinners etc???
     
  29. ShadeWPI

    ShadeWPI

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    jmjkd,

    That of course depends on the survival situation.

    In general I try to keep my survival gear light and compact, this increases the chance of having the survival gear available when you need it. Typically this means making sure that each tool you carry is as versital as practical, without sacrificing reliability or capability of performing it's most likely needed features.

    A small, packable folding handsaw or bow saw can be extremely useful, and should be considered, on the other hand a dedicated skinner knife is likely wasteful since the function can be served reasonably well with a well designed fixed blade and the skinner is less generally useful.

    Now, if I'm going camping for the weekend and I'm taking my car, so I don't have to carry all my gear on my back, I have a larger survival pack in the car, just in case. This kit is more likely to have all of the "right tools for the job" but simply isn't practical to hump through the woods if I get lost on a hike, while hunting or have to ditch the car.
     
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  30. Chrisg67

    Chrisg67

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    well said.

    a good survival knife should be able to skin IMO, since eating is a integral part of survival.
     

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