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Military ID?

J

Jose

Chapter 140 - Section 129C

Persons exempt from licensing

(o) Persons in the military or other service of any state or of the United States, and police officers and other peace officers of any jurisdiction, in the performance of their official duty or when duly authorized to possess them

So the answer is still no?

Yes, the answer is still no.

I seriously doubt that your unit commander duly authorizes you to go about armed and I seriously doubt that if you were you had to go buy your weapons at a gun store.

You are trying to use a military ID to buy personal firearms and carry them concealed in Massachussetts. Which means you are trying to commit a felony. Even I know that.

Proceed at your own risk.
 
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As a holder of a military ID... Yes you can carry a weapon when on official duty. Meaning on orders while with your unit. No you can not buy a weapon or ammo.
 
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drgrant

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A is a definite no. (much in the same way that a LEO badge is not
a substitute for an LTC when buying a handgun. )

Unless you're under ORDERS to carry a handgun, B is
definitely no, as without authority/reason the "performance of
official duty" thing is not qualified and thus does not apply.

-Mike
 

depicts

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Again, the exemptions only cover a Military person in the performance of their OFFICIAL duties.

Years ago I had the occasion to carry an M-14 in a color guard. As soon as the memorial service was over, the weapons were returned to the unit armorer at the Boston Army Base.

The one exception to this rule that I know about, is that if you are active duty, and on a military base with a PX that sells firearms, you may purchase firearms and ammo on base. Then as soon as you get the weapon, it must be locked up by the Armorer. Then you need a reason to draw it from lock up, such as a competition, or change of duty station.

I don't know how many PX's still sell firearms, but back when I was in you could buy a goodly selection of Pistols and Rifles and Shotguns on base. I bought my first Model 10 when I was 17, stationed at Flegerhorst (SP) Kacern (SP) (It's been a long time) in Hanau.
 

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The following is said somewhat in jest, but has a lot of truth to it.
The US Military doesn't trust their troops to carry guns except in a war zone or while on guard duty . . . and many times they aren't allowed to have ammo!

Reality, not in jest:
I worked on Commissioned Nuclear Subs at GD/EB and sometimes on the Navy Base - Groton. Never saw anyone there armed except at the gates. The US Navy watch topside a Sub had a .45 with NO MAGS! This was during the "Cold War" and we were all told that Soviet spies were in the area trying to get whatever intel and pictures possible.

So given the above . . . what do you think the chances are of some random Soldier/Sailor/Marine/Airman would be given permission to carry any weapon around MA? Somewhere between none and damn slim in my book.
 
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The following is said somewhat in jest, but has a lot of truth to it.
The US Military doesn't trust their troops to carry guns except in a war zone or while on guard duty . . . and many times they aren't allowed to have ammo!

Reality, not in jest:
I worked on Commissioned Nuclear Subs at GD/EB and sometimes on the Navy Base - Groton. Never saw anyone there armed except at the gates. The US Navy watch topside a Sub had a .45 with NO MAGS! This was during the "Cold War" and we were all told that Soviet spies were in the area trying to get whatever intel and pictures possible.

So given the above . . . what do you think the chances are of some random Soldier/Sailor/Marine/Airman would be given permission to carry any weapon around MA? Somewhere between none and damn slim in my book.

Many (I always shy from saying most, even though I can't think of one that doesn't fit this) commanding officers ( I think the State AG in the case of Guard members) forbid soldiers from carrying concealed.
 

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When at Ft Dix, I carried an empty M14 while on guard duty. While on guard duty at Ft Devens, I guarded about a dozen empty abandoned barracks with a loaded Carbine. I was given the gun and told to guard the area. I never saw an M1 Carbine before and never got a chance to do anything but insert a loaded mag. If I had to shoot it I'm not sure I could at that point.

Sorry for the drift. The post brought back memories.
 

Doctordrew

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only in the case of being on official duty. otherwise you are just a regular guy like us.

cant LEO's carry LEO mags while off duty? because their legally allowed to posess them? such as a gun not on the "list"?


from a thread i started a week ago....
me "another question, would I be able to carry my high cap LEO mags while off duty?"

LenS "If you are entitled to own LE mags, then you may carry them any time and place you'd like."
 
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N.E. CHARTERS

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QUOTE

"Reality, not in jest:
I worked on Commissioned Nuclear Subs at GD/EB and sometimes on the Navy Base - Groton. Never saw anyone there armed except at the gates. The US Navy watch topside a Sub had a .45 with NO MAGS! This was during the "Cold War" and we were all told that Soviet spies were in the area trying to get whatever intel and pictures possible.""



Lens: We had the Mags. Every topside watch and/or Nulcear wepons security guard was issued 2 Magizines with 7 rounds of hardball.45acp in each. (Most guys I know also had a box of ammo in their pocket. Personall stock)(One guy even used to IWB carry his own pissant 9mm)

The standing rule was we were authorized use of "Deadly Force". If you loaded your mag you stripped a round and fired. Safetys were never used. If you loaded your .45 you were expected to use it. If you used it you were expected to show a body.


I only know of two cases were a topside watch used his weapon. First was in Charlston were a commander from a surface ship drunk as a skunk tried to force his way past a 3rd class Petty Officer on topside watch. the ex commander made it one foot inside the conning tower hatch. The P.O. 3 was promoted to 2nd class and sent to Hawaii as a reprimand.

The second time was the morning that I turned over the watch in Portsmouth, NH to another sailor who let a drunkin seaman take the roving topside watch. At the time I was a diver on the boat and the guy told NIS that 2 divers had tried to attack the sub and he shot them. Long story. I spent the entire day with NIS. I did not find out till many years later that some shipyard workers gave the seaman some drinks on watch and dared him to shoot some seagulls which he did. Ill see if I can find the newspaper artical. Its on the web somewhere.

So the M14s and the Shotguns were only used if the repel boarders alarm was rang. Other than that it was Belaying pins and .45s

SSA41186.JPG



Lens: WARNING SHOTS were NOT ALLOWED! I got my shit jumpped all over by a OD for not shooting a local lobsterman who had drifted onto our hull becuse his boat was on fire. I called the fire alarm and we put out the fire with extingushers. The guy was grateful. You do need to use some judgement in these matters. I recall when old Hymen asked me if I would fire a missle if told to do so. I replyed "It Depends" He was rather surprised by my answer...They dont like people in the military who think for themselves.

However I was ever diligant in removing offending lobster traps from the security zone around the boat. Not wanting to waste I always insured that the lobster were killed with utmost prejuduce in the crulest manor of being boiled alive!

My Favorite Uniform was my DRESS WHITES!
 
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I didn't serve, but I did spend 3 years as a nuclear engineer boarding and crawling around a lot of subs at EB (sometimes as many as 3-5 in one day).

One day as a "party boat" ignored the signs about getting within xxx feet of the sub, I asked the Navy Watch why he didn't let one fly over their bow. His response was to show me the empty mag well in his holstered 1911 and explain that he wasn't allowed to possess any mags or ammo while on watch.

I took his word for it and never saw any mags being carried by any Watch during my three years.

I really, truly would have loved seeing a Watch let one fly across the bow of one of these errant idiot's boats. They used to buzz the Boats within 15-20' all the time. If they did it once, word would spread and the problem would have disappeared real quickly. [thinking]
 

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cant LEO's carry LEO mags while off duty? because their legally allowed to posess them? such as a gun not on the "list"?


from a thread i started a week ago....
me "another question, would I be able to carry my high cap LEO mags while off duty?"

LenS "If you are entitled to own LE mags, then you may carry them any time and place you'd like."

Drew, you answered your own question with my quotes.

Mil are usually restricted due to their commanders' rules and their serious distrust of arming their men/women (something I find abhorrent).

LEOs are usually (but certainly not always) allowed by their bosses to be armed off-duty, usually by virtue of any rules to the contrary.
 
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This always puzzled me...When visiting my brother Lt.Col USAF in DC, I noticed that nearly everyone in every building, from enlisted to officers were in fatigues rather than dress uniforms. The explanation I received was that since 9/11 it has been procedure, (state of readiness). It struck me however that no one, (my brother included) carries a weapon. One would thin k that in a target rich environment like D.C., that the armed forces would trust their own to be...well...armed....[thinking]
 
J

Jose

I can confirm that back in the late 80s early 90s the Navy treated its personnel on armed watch as nothing more than Barney Fifes. Literally.
 
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If you are a member of the armed forces of the United States on active duty and stationed in Massachusetts and not a Massachusetts resident, you are eligible to apply for a non-resident license to carry which if granted for "any lawful purpose" will entitle you to carry concealed off duty. Remember, of course that if you are single and live on your installation, your weapon will most probably have to be stored in the arms room of your unit.

You can find information on a non-resident license to carry at the Mass.gov website.

The military has always been stupid about issuing unloaded weapons for guard duty so the related stories are the norm and not the exception.

To the person who made the comment about military personnel always wearing ACU's, BDU's, and fatigues before that, the wannbe senior officers think it is cool to "suit up for the game" even though it is 5,000 miles away. Again more military stupidity. It's is nothing new for the Army...it has worn field uniforms in office garrison enviornments for years.

Mark L.
 
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If you are a member of the armed forces of the United States on active duty and stationed in Massachusetts and not a Massachusetts resident, you are eligible to apply for a non-resident license to carry which if granted for "any lawful purpose" will entitle you to carry concealed off duty. Remember, of course that if you are single and live on your installation, your weapon will most probably have to be stored in the arms room of your unit.

You can find information on a non-resident license to carry at the Mass.gov website.

The military has always been stupid about issuing unloaded weapons for guard duty so the related stories are the norm and not the exception.

To the person who made the comment about military personnel always wearing ACU's, BDU's, and fatigues before that, the wannbe senior officers think it is cool to "suit up for the game" even though it is 5,000 miles away. Again more military stupidity. It's is nothing new for the Army...it has worn field uniforms in office garrison enviornments for years.

Mark L.

That was me - thanks for the explanation. Pre 9/11 when I visited my brother at Edwards then Hanscom, officers wore shirt and tie. Post 911, it looks like Bob's Fatigue City. The streets of DC are clogged with BDU's, but not one weapon. When my brother was pinned in DC, 3/4 of the officers who showed up were in woodland bdu's or a flight suit...I found it odd
 

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To add on to what Mark L said about cammies in garrison. On my base it was always the Base C.O. or the BTN C.O. that made the requirements for the uniform of the day. When I first started it was Charlie uniforms. Short sleeve button up shirt and slacks. The next C.O. made the uniform of the day cammies which everybody loved not only because they were way more comfortable but you could wear them more than one day between dry cleanings.
 

depicts

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I preferred to wear my fatigues (we didn't call them fatigues way back when, until Vietnam). I hated wearing my Class A's when I was stateside. I have never gotten the taste for ties or starched Khakis.

As to why military personnel don't carry weapons, for the most part, is because the military really doesn't think we are going to ever be in a PRIMARILY small arms situating.

When we have satellites, Rockets, Cruise missiles, Stealth Bombers, Fighter Jets and all the other assorted toys of the military, there isn't a whole lot of need to carry a .45.

Beside that, any unit that might be called into a small arms situation have their weapons near enough that they can draw them from the arms room as soon as they need it.

Even in Vietnam, many units locked up the M-16's in chained rifle racks because too many Bozo's were shooting each other at base camp. If we got hit at any time, it was someones job to unlock the M16 and pass out bandoleers of ammo. It was pretty routine. The folks on perimeter guard were VERY well armed 24/7/365 though.
 
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Was at the Wal-Mart in Pittsfield (back when they sold guns) and the guy there told me that my military ID exempted me from the Massachusetts Gun Laws. I often wondered if guys like him were the reason Wal-Mart decided not to sell guns anymore.

Some of you may not know that military ID's no longer differentiate between active, reserve and the National Guard. The green and red (always looked pink to me) cards are long gone. The component the soldier is in is no longer on the new CAC cards ether.

As for ammo for people on guard duty, its a matter of risk assessment. The likelihood of some immature, bored or just plain retarded serviceman accidentally killing himself or others, or committing suicide is far more likely than terrorists attacking a military installation in the US. So, as a commander, would you take the 1-1,000 chance that one of your soldiers kills himself or others by accident, or the 1-10,000,000 chance that terrorists will attack during your units’ rotation on post guard?

Our service men and women or the best they ever been, but suicides are up. And there are enough immature and/or bored servicemen that do stupid things when no one is looking. I was on a casualty notification team once, an experience I would never forget or would ever want to do again. The only thing worse would to be on such a team that has to tell some mother that her child was accidentally killed by his buddy while guarding empty barracks at Camp Swampy, Any town USA.
 
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