Daily Carry First Aid Kit

Boghog1

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Looking for a FAK for daily carry, on body so thinking about ankle carry, figure tourniquet, celox gauze, cpr pocket shield. chest seal. Is there anything else? does someone make a kit already? preferred set ups?
 
Looking for a FAK for daily carry, on body so thinking about ankle carry, figure tourniquet, celox gauze, cpr pocket shield. chest seal. Is there anything else? does someone make a kit already? preferred set ups?
The only thing about an ankle kit is it gets wet and dirty. I currently just use my ankle carry one inside of my little tiny first aid one.

I would just add some decompression needles and chest seals to this one.


I’m not sure if it’s worth a doubt it was much cheaper when I bought it.

I added a decompression needles, quick clot, a few other small things, and now that it resides in my first aid kit. It also has chest seals tucked in with it I’m not saying you couldn’t wear it with them. But they’ll have to be inspected and replaced.

I’ll take photos tomorrow
 
Looking for a FAK for daily carry, on body so thinking about ankle carry, figure tourniquet, celox gauze, cpr pocket shield. chest seal. Is there anything else? does someone make a kit already? preferred set ups?
Just a note that latest CPR training no longer calls for blowing into the patient's mouth. Only chest compression.
 
I forgot to mention you’re likely gonna need some Narcan and an EpiPen. It’s not necessary related to what we’re talking about but those are good things to have.
 
As people have mentioned above Ankle kits are not the greatest. If you are dead set on one I have always pointed people to buying direct from North American Rescue for any kit (in your case their ankle trauma kit). In reality you will use bandaids and tape more than anything else.

To touch a little on some points others have made so far,

-Lay person CPR aka AHA “Heart Saver” no longer recommends mouth to mouth, and even with a barrier device present advises focusing on good quality compressions and early defibrillation as both are they only interventions that have proven to lead to improved outcomes. Mouth to mouth only becomes advised when the etiology leading to the arrest is thought to be respiratory in nature. This is most often only the case in young infants, and children. When it comes to a child are you that concerned having a barrier device present? I know my answer to that question, but you have to ask yourself that and come to your own decision.

-Quick clot, and hemostatics in general have minimal improvement in stopping bleeds. Compressed gauze that is properly applied directly to the source in conjunction with proper packing that places adequate pressure has been found to lead to hemostasis equally as often. Where hemostatics excel is in reducing the time to reach hemostasis. I only say this as people far too often focus on hemostatics which are costly compared to compressed gauze, and then skimp out on other important pieces of a kit due to lack of funds. When it comes to hemostatics kaolin based products (Quick Clot) has been the standard as it works by activating the clotting cascade. Chitosan (Celox) doesn’t work by activating the clotting cascade but by instead creating an expanding gel like “glue” and for a long time has been considered 2nd line.

-Decompression needles… be extremely careful. Needle decompression has significant risks, and is rarely indicated. This is a procedure that I believe people are misguided with its frequency of occurrence and risk. To put this into perspective this is a procedure that Basic EMTS who staff most ambulances are unable to perform. This is reserved for ALS level providers operating as Paramedics. What patients with penetrating chest trauma need is a thoracostomy and ultimately a chest tube. Even with training and authorization I know few who would ever preform a needle decompression out side of the professional setting. If you are dead set on having this capability I recommend the North American Rescue SPEAR, or a similar needle that is 10 gauge. The standard 14 gauge is just too small.

-Tourniquets. True CAT’s are good to go just make sure that you get a real one from a reputable vendor. If you have a child I recommend the SAM XT tourniquet as it utilizes a mechanical lock that will allow application on smaller limbs. The SAM XT is also great in the fact that it solves the number one issue with lay person application which is putting the TQ on to loosely prior to utilizing the windlass.

-Epi Pen. Great to have but they are expensive, require a prescription, and epinephrine is pretty sensitive to temperature extremes.

-Narcan. It’s everywhere now, and you can usually find programs giving it away for free.
 
As people have mentioned above Ankle kits are not the greatest. If you are dead set on one I have always pointed people to buying direct from North American Rescue for any kit (in your case their ankle trauma kit). In reality you will use bandaids and tape more than anything else.

To touch a little on some points others have made so far,

-Lay person CPR aka AHA “Heart Saver” no longer recommends mouth to mouth, and even with a barrier device present advises focusing on good quality compressions and early defibrillation as both are they only interventions that have proven to lead to improved outcomes. Mouth to mouth only becomes advised when the etiology leading to the arrest is thought to be respiratory in nature. This is most often only the case in young infants, and children. When it comes to a child are you that concerned having a barrier device present? I know my answer to that question, but you have to ask yourself that and come to your own decision.

-Quick clot, and hemostatics in general have minimal improvement in stopping bleeds. Compressed gauze that is properly applied directly to the source in conjunction with proper packing that places adequate pressure has been found to lead to hemostasis equally as often. Where hemostatics excel is in reducing the time to reach hemostasis. I only say this as people far too often focus on hemostatics which are costly compared to compressed gauze, and then skimp out on other important pieces of a kit due to lack of funds. When it comes to hemostatics kaolin based products (Quick Clot) has been the standard as it works by activating the clotting cascade. Chitosan (Celox) doesn’t work by activating the clotting cascade but by instead creating an expanding gel like “glue” and for a long time has been considered 2nd line.

-Decompression needles… be extremely careful. Needle decompression has significant risks, and is rarely indicated. This is a procedure that I believe people are misguided with its frequency of occurrence and risk. To put this into perspective this is a procedure that Basic EMTS who staff most ambulances are unable to perform. This is reserved for ALS level providers operating as Paramedics. What patients with penetrating chest trauma need is a thoracostomy and ultimately a chest tube. Even with training and authorization I know few who would ever preform a needle decompression out side of the professional setting. If you are dead set on having this capability I recommend the North American Rescue SPEAR, or a similar needle that is 10 gauge. The standard 14 gauge is just too small.

-Tourniquets. True CAT’s are good to go just make sure that you get a real one from a reputable vendor. If you have a child I recommend the SAM XT tourniquet as it utilizes a mechanical lock that will allow application on smaller limbs. The SAM XT is also great in the fact that it solves the number one issue with lay person application which is putting the TQ on to loosely prior to utilizing the windlass.

-Epi Pen. Great to have but they are expensive, require a prescription, and epinephrine is pretty sensitive to temperature extremes.

-Narcan. It’s everywhere now, and you can usually find programs giving it away for free.
Basically agree on everything. I don't carry a kit on myself, but I keep one in my truck and bring it with me to the bench at the range. I also keep one tourniquet in each front door pocket in my truck, and hand wipes in each rear door cupholder. I know decompression needles are what the cool guys teach in TCCC and my medical director allows me to do it at work, but I don't live 2 hours from an EMS response. I'm focusing on bleeding control, airway, and keeping them warm. I'm about task saturated at that point if I'm by myself.

Very small generic soft side zip closed tool bag. On the outside pockets I keep 2 CAT tourniquets, shears, nitrile gloves.

Inside, no separate compartments, all just tucked in together. Basically zip open then top to bottom:
Eyepro, N95 mask, headlamp
2 6" Tacmed Solutions OLAES bandages, 1 twin pack of compact Hyfin vented chest seals
small ziplock bag with 4 doses of Narcan, small ziplock bag with an OPA kit
1 adult size collapsible bag valve, 1 pedi mask, 1 adult mask,
1 regular adult CPR mask in a case, #3 and #4 iGel airways
2 foil blankets

I figure that will keep me busy until someone on duty gets there.

medkit1.jpg

medkit2.jpg
 
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