Your new car is going to be reporting on you

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You already know that your cell phone is reporting your location, what you search for, etc. You probably don't know that your car can also do this.

Newer model cars are equipped with cellular radios that can send info back. Two new companies, Mobileye and Caramera, both who make lots of the SW for autonomous driving are looking at monetizing the data. For instance, cars with automatic avoidance systems have radar, lidar, and multiple cameras. The cameras can count the number of people, so they can sell back to whomever how many people are at comm ave and exeter st at any time. They can sell data back to the state on potholes. They have not yet thought of all the ways to make money. the cameras can recognize people, makes of cars, traffic signs, traffic lights. The lidar can measure distances. They use this to get precise mappings, for autonomous driving , gps is not accurate enough, only to a few feet, and not enough to keep the car in the lane. They are making very HD maps. Toyota and Ford have this in new model cars coming.

The big problem here is that there are no privacy laws yet, so there is no protection for consumers. No laws state, you must anonymize the data. And you need to get permission to sell the data. Or the data must be erased after a certain amount of time. And our pols, both D and R sell us out time and time again.

It truly is big brother. The next few generations will see amazing changes but at a cost to privacy and liberty. Assuming some virus from the far east doesn't wipe out humanity.
 

Varmint

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It is probably time to just ban this kind of advertising. You'd save privacy and the only thing you'd lose would be annoying ads that nobody likes anyway.

Of course Congress is better acquainted with Google and Facebook than they are with the right to privacy.
 

Evtide

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I recall catching a podcast a few months ago stating that some cameras used in the trucking industry capture license plates / locations of fellow motorists on the road. I believe it was a private company collecting the data vs. a .gov entity. Bounty hunters and private investigators were mentioned as being big customers. Not saying this is the case, but if it’s not I’m sure it’s coming.
 
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All they need is to offer people some sh*tty incentive like a cup of coffee.

I think it is Plymouth Rock that offers an app. It rewards good driving with points you can trade for stupid sh*t like coffee. But, according to the company, bad driving does not affect your score (yeah, sure, LOL).

Anyway, I read the reviews in the app store for fun. It had thousands of downloads, the app worked like sh*t, but the main complaint was that sometimes it wouldnt record correctly so people couldnt get reward points for coffee.

All people cared about was their stupid cup of coffee that they thought was "free".

That is how easy it is to get people to voluntarily share their driving history.

I cant wait until we start hearing from people that their insurance costs are randomly increasing because of an app that wasnt supposed to be used in a negative way.
 

NotUniqueEnough

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I recall catching a podcast a few months ago stating that some cameras used in the trucking industry capture license plates / locations of fellow motorists on the road. I believe it was a private company collecting the data vs. a .gov entity. Bounty hunters and private investigators were mentioned as being big customers. Not saying this is the case, but if it’s not I’m sure it’s coming.
You are correct, Repo companies and quite a few police departments use this technology to track and locate. Its a subscription service for NON LE Agencies.
 

Rob Boudrie

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It will be interesting when use of the car data creeps down to minor traffic accidents - like proving you were going 5MPH over the speed limit to establish you are at fault. I see a big market for an auto-erase device that clears this info every time you turn the car off if such extraction becomes commonplace.
 
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It will be interesting when use of the car data creeps down to minor traffic accidents - like proving you were going 5MPH over the speed limit to establish you are at fault. I see a big market for an auto-erase device that clears this info every time you turn the car off if such extraction becomes commonplace.
Then someone would pass a law, if the miles dont match the log, you go to jail, or are considered guilty in an accident if they see logs are missing.

If we could guarantee that a law wont be passed, then I 100% agree with you. Left alone, the market will come up with a solution to change this in a matter of days, if not hours.
 

JayMcB

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How is this different than when all of the insurance companies wanted to hawk something to be placed in your OBDII port? Eff them all.
The dongle is an opt IN, with the integrated bullshit, there is no opt OUT, other than buying something that doesn't have it. Every time I read something like this, I go out and do some additional rustproofing on the 2 vehicles with near zero electonics, my '99 tahoe diesel, and my electronics-free deuce and a half
 

Rob Boudrie

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ATP pilots have a bit of this now. After an incident free flight, there is a control they can operate to erase the audio, however, I have read that is even less effective that deleting a file on a NTFS partition.
 
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At my age I don't suspect I'll be purchasing that many newer cars. Just picked up a 2006 econobox w/95K on it a few months ago that's about as dumb as a car can be and I see no reason to change my purchasing habits in the future. I prefer the ability to chuck an OBD reader on it and try and fix things myself instead of being required to take it into the shop because it's over engineered and I could brick it.
 
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It will be interesting when use of the car data creeps down to minor traffic accidents - like proving you were going 5MPH over the speed limit to establish you are at fault. I see a big market for an auto-erase device that clears this info every time you turn the car off if such extraction becomes commonplace.
They can already do this with the "black box", mandatory in new cars as of 2014.

Newer model cars are equipped with cellular radios that can send info back.
Not all new cars have cellular/data capabilities, though this extra data collection is integral to Tesla and some other high-end vehicles[/quote]

Toyota and Ford have this in new model cars coming.
The big problem here is that there are no privacy laws yet, so there is no protection for consumers. No laws state, you must anonymize the data. And you need to get permission to sell the data. Or the data must be erased after a certain amount of time. And our pols, both D and R sell us out time and time again.
It truly is big brother. The next few generations will see amazing changes but at a cost to privacy and liberty. Assuming some virus from the far east doesn't wipe out humanity.
At the moment, you can still vote with your pocketbook, not buy a "Connected" car (no Tesla, nothing with OnStar/UConnect/Audio Connect/mbrace/etc)
 
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like proving you were going 5MPH over the speed limit to establish you are at fault

They can already do this with the "black box", mandatory in new cars as of 2014.
You're a few decades late. The ECM's have recorded a number of parameters that can be downloaded using manufacturer's software. They were installing them in many cars long before that. Our 200 era Crown Vics had data storing ECM's.
 

Inside Out

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It’s not accurate to say there are “no privacy laws yet.” There are actually lots, and some of them are pretty onerous on private companies. California leads the way here, but other states have thrown their hat in the ring too.

One problem is that the technology and collection methods tend to evolve more quickly than our legislators (who, for once, are trying to do something useful).

As usual, caveat emptor.
 

Rob Boudrie

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You're a few decades late. The ECM's have recorded a number of parameters that can be downloaded using manufacturer's software. They were installing them in many cars long before that. Our 200 era Crown Vics had data storing ECM's.
True, but it is not yet (emphasis yet) download for the fault assessment in all but the most major of accidents and then only when the system is looking to nail someone on a criminal charge. It's not much of a leap for insurance companies to grab the data for minor injury free fender benders to maximize the chance of having a surcharge stick.
 
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