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Wifi network design for a new house

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by rep308, Oct 15, 2018.

  1. Mawagian

    Mawagian

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    I’m a huge fan of Ubiquiti stuff. People that dog it usually don’t know how to set it up. For that size house I would put one AP like the uap AC on each floor. Mount them to the ceilings in the center of the structure . Also you don’t really need to get a POE switch unless you have a need for other POE ports for other POE devices like cameras etc. because each Ubiquiti AP comes with its own POE injector. The Ubiquiti Edge router X is also a nice little router with plenty of throughput capability for home use. So from your provider just get a modem (wired) for a route to the internet.
     

  2. 42!

    42! NES Life Member NES Member

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    My comments to never use Ubiquiti are specific to the UniFi line, I routinely use their Edge Switch, just be sure to upgrade the firmware out of the box. They are still shipping with the 1.0.1 version and the management (GUI and SSH) become unresponsive after a little time of moderate traffic.
     
  3. Kevin_NH

    Kevin_NH NES Member

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    I'm strongly in the "Conduit" camp -- I'd still run two pair of Cat6 strategically where you know you definitely need reliable network connectivity (for wireless APs, TV, gaming PC, cameras). If conduit everywhere is cost-prohibitive, at least add a large diameter run from whereever the modem would be to each floor and also a run to the attic. Cap off the conduit at both ends -- keeps it from getting gunked up during drywalling, and keeps the fire inspector happy.
     
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  4. rep308

    rep308 NES Member

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    Current plan it to run this stuff: Sewell SolidRun RG6 + Cat6 Siamese 1000ft - SewellDirect.com

    2 cat 6 and 1 RG 6 cable to each bedroom and the family room media area and two cat 6 and maybe power to the central first floor and second floor ceiling for Unifi units. Trying to run a two inch conduit from the basement utility side to attic above the 2nd floor to future proof things
     
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  5. n1bsbri

    n1bsbri NES Member

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    You don't need to run power to the Unifi APs, they are POE, the injector can be near the router / switch where you plug it into the network. Just CAT5 / CAT6 to the AP.
     
  6. Rob Boudrie

    Rob Boudrie NES Member

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    Screw the injector, just use a router that supplies POE. I like the Netgear GS100TP. Just be sure you get POE+ if your equipment requires it, though the cameras and WAPs I've seen don't need the extra wattage of +.
     
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  7. n1bsbri

    n1bsbri NES Member

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    Yes, definitely a cleaner solution if planning to replace the switch / router, or supply a new one. However, I'm cheap and I used the injectors that came with the Unifi APs, and kept my old switch. :emoji_wink:
     
  8. rep308

    rep308 NES Member

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    I'm new to this and on the hook for the design. They probably will get FIOS as the source, here is the plan

    Ubiquiti Networks Unifi 802.11ac Dual-Radio PRO Access Point (UAP-AC-PRO-US)

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B015PRO51...olid=2FZHKAB4F68P2&psc=0&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it

    Ubiquiti Networks 8-Port UniFi Switch, Managed PoE+ Gigabit Switch with SFP, 150W

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01DKXT4C...olid=2FZHKAB4F68P2&psc=0&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it

    Keep in mind that this is for a two story 2400 sq ft colonial residence so I don't want to go too overboard
     
  9. JackOfAllTrades

    JackOfAllTrades

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    You might want to rethink that cable.

    The CAT6 is copper clad aluminum and the RG6 is copper clad steel.

    You will eventually have issues with the aluminum creeping in the crimp connectors resulting in bad connections. The steel core will eventually have rust issues (remember, the end is exposed where cut).

    If this cable is stapled to the studs it isn't going to be replaceable. You might want to go with cable that has actual copper conductors.
     
  10. Rob Boudrie

    Rob Boudrie NES Member

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    Regular network cable sold as Cat 6 or 6a is often copper clad AL, especially if you see an incredible price. Be sure to check this at both purchase time and when you get your cable.
     
  11. drgrant

    drgrant Moderator NES Member

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    That stuff is so cheap/skinflint that I would be deeply suspicious of it because of the price alone, unless the price of copper has plummeted which is pretty
    doubtful.

    I don't even think you can get a 1000 foot reel of real CAT-6 plenum for $159 these days. Hell I think in the distant past that is about what I paid for 1000 feet
    of PVC riser CAT-5.

    -Mike
     
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  12. rep308

    rep308 NES Member

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    Thanks I'll review the cable selection and maybe just run individual cables. I'm not trying to cheap out, I'm just new to this as I've never purchased or run my own stuff.
     
  13. Rob Boudrie

    Rob Boudrie NES Member

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    You would be right - check the product listing.

    The way they write the spec is designed to have amateurs miss the fact that the RG6 is copper clad AL is by listing it as "
    High Copper Content CCA". It's no accident that Copper is spelled out and Aluminum is only listed via the abbreviation "CCA".

    High Copper Content CCA is an oxymoron.

    I recently bought a 1000ft spool of outdoor rated Cat6 for the gun club and there was lots of copper clad on Amazon, but some vendors had solid copper. I got the later.

    My only use for copper clad is the bottom of cooking pots and jacketed bullets.

    Oh, and those 1/2" long grounding rods that used to be copper? They are now copper clad something.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2019 at 11:29 AM
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  14. Rob Boudrie

    Rob Boudrie NES Member

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    Be sure to get a nice crimping tool for the RJ45 connectors. I suggest using the T568B wiring standard as that is the most common in use. After doing a few, you won't even have to look up the color sequence.

    [​IMG]
     
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  15. drgrant

    drgrant Moderator NES Member

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    I'll add that if he does things the "correct way" he will never have to crimp a single connector in the entire system. If it's not installed with punch down tools, you're probably doing something wrong. I think they even sell cheap PDTs at Home Deepco and other places now for under 50 bucks now. I still have a couple Harris/Dracon tools, though. Yes, doing things the right way incurs cost (patch panels, boxes, or what have you) but it's short money to not have the grief of hand crimped connectors. One of my customers has a skinflint hand crimped system in his store and I periodically have to repair connections for him as a result. Solid core premise wiring is meant to be fixed in place and never flexed or moved much after it's installed.

    Of course some will argue "well I did it this way and it works" and yeah it does work, but it's just setting yourself up to drive you crazy down the road.

    Knowing what I know now I'd buy a punch down tool long before a crimper. I still have a crimper around somewhere, but I'm more apt to use that for ham radio crap than data stuff... (some ham rigs use RJ-45 jacks for microphone connectors).

    -Mike
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2019 at 11:41 AM

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