What's the best camo color for hunting in New England?

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Realtree (i.e. AP), or one of the Mossy Oak patterns (if so, which?).

I have to imagine it doesn't really matter. Any camo is better than none. But since I'm new to this, and will be starting from scratch with a backpack, pants, jacket, hat, etc... if there's a general consensus among you more experienced folks, I'd certainly listen to what you've got to say.

General hunting - ducks, turkey, deer, etc. in & around Central MA & New England.
 
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For woods hunting I prefer a light gray based camo that is larger patterned and not so detailed, darker patterns tend to stand out at distance and make movement much more noticeable like desert camo that the military used/uses or the grassland type patterns, also textured camo really makes a difference in breaking up the human shape

like this
http://www.amazon.com/NatGear-3D-Le...8&s=apparel&qlEnable=1&qid=1282679868&sr=1-18

Another thing I try and do is use two different camos for top and bottom to further break up the human shape
 
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Remember most modern camo is designed to impress people, large patches of color, pay attention to breaking up the human outline, especially the head/shoulder area.
Color depends on your terrain, for me grays, browns and greens and late season some tans. Almost as important is how you wash it, make sure you get a detergent that has no scent or uv brightners, animals can see better in the uv band then we do, anything that glows under a black light will glow in the woods.
 

Spanz

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It does depend on the time of the year, but a lot of the tree trunks seem to be more grayish in color than brown, so I usually go with muted grey. In mass, I think the only time you can use camo instead of blaze orange is when bear hunting or bow hunting...correct me if I am wrong.
 
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here is what the ma abstracts say about blaze orange "HUNTER ORANGE: No person shall hunt during the pheasant or quail season on public shooting grounds or WMAs where pheasant or quail are stocked without wearing a “hunter orange” cap or hat except while night-hunting for raccoons or opossums, or while hunting waterfowl from a blind or boat. During the period when it is legal to hunt deer with a shotgun, all hunters, except waterfowl hunters hunting within a blind or from a boat, must wear, in a conspicuous manner on chest, back, and head, a minimum of 500 square inches of “hunter orange” clothing or material. During the muzzleloader season-only deer hunters must comply with the 500 sq. inch hunter orange requirement."

http://www.mass.gov/dfwele/dfw/regulations/abstracts/hunt_fish_abstracts.pdf
 
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There is no 1 pattern that does it all. The trouble with the camo on the racks at the hunting store is that it is usually specific to a type of wooodland or terrain. You could spend a small fortune on camo patterns, warm weather, rain, and cold versions of each. I own a couple of these sorts of patterns, but I keep it a mixed forest look, pines, oaks, etc.
Most of my hunting time I spend on the ground. I prefer wearing good military camo instead, you should look at the new stuff that all our branches will soon enough be wearing, it is called Multicam. Google that, look in google images. They also have gone back to the buttons instead of velcro-thank God, the digital camo with velcro closures suck as far as long term durability go. You'll spend $35-45 each for new top and bottom of the Multicam, but it is worth the money. Tough as nails clothing, that you can get dirty, spray bug spray on, etc, and not worry about it.
Deer don't have a lot of color receptors in their eye structures, which means they really don't see a lot of color, nothing like we do. Their eyes are made for gathering light, and noticing movement. You won't stand out like a crow against snow when you wear hunter orange while deer hunting, it is far more important to be still and move as little as possible.
The Swiss military has a couple of autumn camo patterns that use red and yellow along with the other colors, in the right conditions you will vanish when you get 10 feet in to the brush, like when the leaves are all turning color. You might consider those patterns, but they are only good for a few weeks of the fall.
Amazing things will happen to you when you are head to foot in camo and out in the wild.
 
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