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What's a good place to order a custom PC?

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Prepper, Feb 10, 2019.

  1. Golddiggie

    Golddiggie NES Member

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    I'm in the IT field, so protecting my important data is second nature. Plus I have a home lab setup that I use for self training/education (has done well for me over the years).

    I went through some of the older backups from systems that are long since gone a while back. Deleted things that have no value anymore (old product keys that are not needed, or software downloads that have been replaced by much newer versions). I tend to keep my photographs for a longer term. Mostly because I'm never sure when a family member might want one of them again (mom has asked for old pictures I took and I'm glad I had them).

    My NAS has almost 9TB of usable space on it currently. A few TB are allocated for home lab use. The rest is available for my computers to use to backup to, or do what I want with. With only a pair of teamed 1Gb NICs on the NAS, data doesn't move as fast as I would like. But, it's also bottlenecked (a bit) by either the single 1Gb connection when wired, or the 802.11AC connection when wireless.

    I would advise that people at least try to get a laptop with a real 1Gb NIC (wired) in it for those times when wireless isn't the better option. It happens often enough IMO/IME, to make it worth having. Yes, I know you can get the USB3 to ethernet adapters, but those don't always work right (unless you look at enough of them). For desktops, at least one 1Gb connection should be standard.
     

  2. Prepper

    Prepper NES Member

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    I still haven't bought anything, but I need to. My old PC won't upgrade to Windows 10... would not activate Windows and the video drivers were nonexistent.

    So I've been shopping again, but I have this issue. Online listings for desktop PCs never properly explain what capacity they have for additional storage devices. I have 2 extra 1TB SSD's (the Samsung 860 EVO's). I don't want to waste them, so I want to put them in the new PC, perhaps replacing the boot disk it comes with if what they provide is crap (i.e. any HD, or a SSD that's too small). How can I be sure which of the computers can take them, and how many? I'm getting a bit confused too because I am not up to speed on the latest storage options. I'm still at the SATA 3 with either 3.5" or 2.5" HD or SSD level of understanding. I guess there's also a ePCI drive, and something called M.2. (Anything else?)

    So, somehow I need to know how many bays there are, and what sizes, as well as how many SATA cables can be connected to the motherboard, and how many extra power supply connectors (the correct type) there will be dangling around for me to connect to storage devices.

    As examples, I had been pondering these three but no matter where I look, I can't figure out what can be put in them:

    https://www.bestbuy.com/site/dell-i...lack-with-silver-trim/6334301.p?skuId=6334301

    https://www.bestbuy.com/site/hp-ome...ezel-dark-chrome-logo/6349466.p?skuId=6349466

    https://www.bestbuy.com/site/lenovo...-1tb-hard-drive-black/6203016.p?skuId=6203016

    And, if I did replace the boot drive, what is the general procedure these days for getting a copy of Windows onto an SSD I provide and getting it activated? When I bought my current PC, I had to first burn a stack of DVD's, and restore later from that. It sucked. Can I make a bootable USB stick with Windows from what comes with the PC? What do you do these days without losing your Windows license?
     
  3. drgrant

    drgrant Moderator NES Member

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    If you are adept at that you're better off just building your own box, frankly... it will be less frustrating than trying to find some consumer-grade POS that will accommodate what you want.
     
  4. 42!

    42! NES Life Member NES Member

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    Sell you could start with the Mfg for info Support for Inspiron 3670 | Documentation | Dell US And you want the Inspiron "3670 Service Manual"

    In this case the answer is No. No extra drive bays, just the one 2.5 and the optical (which you could change out for a heard drive).

    The problem is these aren't standard based cases and mother boards, they aren't designed for you to put together yourself.

    If you wan to build your own, drive down to Microcenter in Cambridge (Ya, I know), or order the parts on-line. But to be honest, you've picked a pretty cheap model, so beware, you will get what you pay for. Personally, for both business and personal use, I recomend this site Dell Factory Outlet: Inventory Search
    You have to choose from what they have, but you get full factory direct service, and I've literally bought thousands of desktops/laptops and hundreds of servers without an issue. One caveat, I always buy the business product lines, no consumer lines, that can make a difference.
     
  5. fshalor

    fshalor NES Member

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    This is weird. We had the opposite experience. Only problems with HP. And zero issues with leonvos outside of user damage.

    Corp stopped buying Lenovos and those of us who still have t460 and t480 units are holding on to them for dear life.

    The HPs that are coming in are okay on Linux but have been lasting around 6 months before needing service .

    My x220 I bought in 2012 is still 100%. So is the t530 I bought in i think 2012. So are the 30 or so t420s I grabbed as refurbs and passed out to people .

    Now all of the carbon line and the edge line? Id say they are garbage. No idea why those products even exist.
     
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  6. Queen Bee

    Queen Bee NES Member

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    I just built my own PC in march, a 12 core I9 and plenty of other good hardware. If you want you can tell me what kind of budget you have for this and we can come up with something and we can build it
     
  7. Spanz

    Spanz NES Member

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    i have had decent luck with IBuyPower.com
    You can start off with one of the "on sale" units, and customize it
     
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  8. Varmint

    Varmint NES Member

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    Just get something like this. Lists all the specs right there. $1300. 512 SSD and 2TB HD. RTX 2070 should run 2 monitors I'd think. i7.

    READY-TO-SHIP GAMER XTREME ET9960

    Case specs.

    1D201BD0-2EE8-464A-80B3-AED700B7F2B4.png
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2019
  9. Prepper

    Prepper NES Member

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    I've been checking out that web site the last couple of hours. I gotta say, it is quite impressive. The main issue is there are going to be decisions I would want to make and I don't know all the answers yet.

    One would be which motherboard (if not what it defaults to such as a Gigabyte something or other). I need to make sure it has enough connectors for 3+ drives (the boot plus 2 more) and what those connector options could be. I guess I also gotta understand what a PCIe drive would be, and M.2. My old PC already has an SSD (SATA 3) for its boot disk and is impressively fast because of this. But, if I can get it even faster with these other interfaces, then I'm thinking that makes sense. Fortunately, this web site tells me exactly what each motherboard name is, which means I can then go look it up. Unlike at Best Buy where no one can tell me anything about what is in it. The guy at Best Buy yesterday actually pointed at a DVI port and thought it was VGA. Clueless. Well, probably not his fault... he wasn't born yet when VGA was the norm.

    And the default systems seem to have a second 1TB HD, which I don't think I need because I want to use an existing SATA 3 SSD (that's 1TB). I would assume if I deselect the second drive option, that it would let me plop in my SSD easily enough. Can I assume the motherboard would come with all the spare power supply connectors and SATA cables, or is that an exercise left to me?

    And, what Intel processors. NOT an i3. I'm stuck between i5/i7/i9, looks like a $300 price difference.

    Most options, I guess I would just default them. I wouldn't know why one graphics card or cooling system or fan is better than any other.
     
  10. Spanz

    Spanz NES Member

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    i would suggest you get the I5, and have them do a modest overclock

    as far as what motherboard, you can go to the MB manufacturer site and look over the data sheet to see what the specs are.
     
  11. AHM

    AHM NES Member

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    In that case, you need to find out precisely which motherboard a prospective system comes with,
    and research the motherboard to find out how many SATA, etc connectors they have.

    (I'm gonna assume you're not actually going to perch Yet More Storage via ePCI -
    not because it's not recommended or unpopular, but because I know nothing of it).

    Complementary concerns are that:
    1. You could buy a system with a toy motherboard in a big case, and discover there aren't enough sockets to service all the drive bays.
    2. You could buy a system with a premium motherboard in a constrained case, and discover there aren't enough drive bays to fit all the disks you could cable to the motherboard.
    A more insidious concern is that many(/all?) motherboards with things like M.2 sockets
    actually share electronics with classic internal SATA sockets. So, to quote my ASRock Z390 Pro4 motherboard specification...

    Peripheral Interfaces
    ...
    • Six Serial ATA (SATA) channels (6.0 Gb/s)
    Expansion Capabilities
    ...
    • Two M.2 Sockets - Supports Intel® Optane™ Technology
    Note:
    M2_1, and SATA3_5 share lanes. If either one of them is in use, the others will be disabled.
    M2_2, and SATA3_1 share lanes. If either one of them is in use, the others will be disabled
    If M.2 has a PCIe device installed, SATA 3_0 will be disabled​
    Unquote.

    So do not buy a system (or a naked motherboard) because you think it comes with 23 SATA ports
    plus some smattering of sockets for other technologies, and assume that you can populate all of them simultaneously.

    As long as you have available expansion board slots,
    you might be able to add a board with multiple ports.
    But that's probably overkill for your actual requirements.

    At some earlier point you should think about alternatives like
    multiple-drive external enclosures or NAS boxes.
    Just keep your wits about you. I would have bought
    this external USB/eSATA from MicroCenter:


    [​IMG]
    Until I read this buyer comment:
    I loaded it with four hard drives. One didn't work at all and was apparently zapped by this unit. The other three worked for all of a week before they could not be found by Windoze. After powering off and back on, the blue lights didn't even light up.
    I took the unit back an got a refund, then purchased a Buffalo "cloud" box to put the drives into. That was even worse! I put the three good drives into that box and installed the software which aborted part way through. I hooked the hard drives back up to an external USB cable only to have Windoze tell me I needed to format the drives before using!
    So if you need the data on your hard drives, I don't recommend this box nor the Buffalo unit.​

    Emphasis mine.
    But yeesh.

    The 1-star ads on Amazon are almost as bad.

    I've actually got this item in an Amazon Wish List:
    [​IMG]
    (Although I haven't scoured the buyer comments for stinkers).
    But more importantly I've backed off on my concern about promptly
    mounting 1-3 more legacy system hard drives on our new desktop.


    Yeah, I wonder about the actual process. But partially because I haven't tried to find the answer. If it was impossible, there would be enough horror stories floating about for me to have heard about them...

    We probably have similar legacy system concerns. Word is, you don't have to worry about Windoze locking its license key to a specific mass storage serial number, having to pay to transfer when your system disk needs replacement.
     
  12. Prepper

    Prepper NES Member

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    So, if I were to get something like this ibuypower without customization:

    Gaming RDY SLIIBG213: iBUYPOWER®

    It says it has a 500GB WD Blue SSD. What's that? Is that a SATA 3 interface with a SATA cable and power cable going to it? Or an M.2? Or something else? I see in the images they appear to have a drive-like device mounted to the side and I can't see any wires. It doesn't look quite like my existing Samsung 860 EVO, which I have in a bay with a contraption around it to make it fit in the larger bay, and a power cable and SATA cable meandering around to plug into it.

    I see the motherboard has 6 SATA ports (and 2 M.2)... good, that's plenty. I'm confused by the case though, where the bays are, where the power comes from to reach whatever SSD I put in the bays, etc. The pic of it looks clean and shows no dangling power connectors all over the place, like every PC I've had before has. So how does that work? I don't want to have to modify a power supply to try to add more cables to it. But surely it wouldn't be that convoluted? Do they already run power to all the bays to make it easy for me? I never did like the old way of picking through the rats nest of wires to see if one of the power connectors was the right one, and try to make it reach where I put the drive.
     
  13. AHM

    AHM NES Member

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    The system internal illustration...
    [​IMG]
    ...shows the SSD is that rectangle sitting on the upper horizontal surface of the box at the bottom of the case - the rectangle starts a few cm above the "ER" of "iBUYPOWER".
    However, so does the analogous photo of our new B742 desktop:
    [​IMG]
    In this photo, the SSD is on top of the 3-drive bay in the lower RH corner of the photo.
    There's no electronic socketry integral to the casework there - just spot-welded sheet metal, with a movable bracket secured by a knurled Phillips machine screw. In that system there must be a modest amount of cabling to the SSD, but I don't see it. Or they photographed a system without an SSD installed.
    Huh; there's another SSD bracket hanging underneath the upper drive bay.

    Yet the SSD in our as-delivered system is actually a WD Blue stick-o'-chewing-gum-format SSD mounted in the M.2 socket immediately below the CPU chip (hidden by the dull aluminum Cooler Master radiator). That space is vacant in the photo, but you can see three vacant copper/brass-colored threaded holes in the motherboard (plus another occupied by the sole machine screw, which is moved to the hole that engages the proper length M.2 board, to keep it pushed into the socket; some other board's illustration:
    [​IMG]
    The socket is all the horizontal 3D wires arrayed above the square containing the words "AMD CROSSFIRE".

    I infer that the average bargain-basement system supplier has no qualms about changing
    which form-factor of SSD to supply. Maybe I'm naive, but I didn't feel cheated by the swap; my advisor didn't coo that I'd won a coin flip, or hint that I'd got scrod. Let an expert correct me, but maybe you shouldn't fixate on the distinction either. (Not saying you don't deserve a healthy sense of curiosity over how modern cases are filled with components - just saying that maybe the two formats are a distinction without a difference).

    Oh, and that PC's ASUS TUF B360M-Plus Gaming Motherboard's manual says:

    M.2 socket 3
    These sockets allow you to install M.2 (NGFF) SSD modules.
    M.2(SOCKET3)
    ...
    • These M.2 sockets support M Key and 2242/2260/2280 storage devices.
    • Both M.2 sockets can support data transfer speed up to 32Gb/s.
    • Only the M.2_2 socket can support Intel® Optane™ memory.
    • Only the M.2_1 socket can support SATA mode storage devices. When a device in
    SATA mode is installed on the M.2_1 socket, SATA_2 is disabled.​

    Where have we read that before...?

    (Actually, it seems like only one of that motherboard's two M.2 SSD (not Wifi) sockets share circuitry with one of its classic internal SATA sockets. Which an expert might consider an obvious consequence of the B360M's interface spec, but superficially seems nice for you).


    As far as the cabling philosophy goes, our (nearly-gaming) system's case has both left and right skins easily removable, and much cabling is routed "underneath" the motherboard - between it and the RH skin (as viewed from the case front, where drink holders optical drives go). This is in marked contrast to our old HP Pavilion XP system, where the bottom of the motherboard is up against a case skin that's not casually removable, but probably conceals few secrets. In fact, the new PC's RH skin is mostly a sheet metal blister that protrudes the better part of an inch away from the motherboard and some case frame stringers.
    [​IMG]
    I damned near cut a drive power wire pushing a drive from "left to right" when seating it into a lower drive bay because I didn't realize I should remove that RH skin to move cables aside. The wire was crimped, but no insulation was broken, and I doubt any wire strands were cut, but I'm damned lucky.

    I mention this because I get the impression you and I are replacing desktops of similar vintage, and while maybe you've always known way more about PC building than I, we may both be making a similar Great Leap of catchup to modern PC technology.
     
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  14. Rob Boudrie

    Rob Boudrie NES Member

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  15. Prepper

    Prepper NES Member

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    That was all about HDD's though. What I'd really want to know is if it is SATA or PCIe (or something else?) which would really tell me the performance. SATA=6Gb, PCIe=quite a bit more, kind of confusing to know for sure, but probably several times more than 6Gb... saw 31Gb somewhere for one option. And what that form factor is that they pictured there.... looks a bit like a smaller 2.5", but not a bubble gum stick M.2 form factor.
     
  16. AHM

    AHM NES Member

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    On the one hand, the illustrated 2½" SSD is clearly a WD Blue - you can see the blue/white slash and the foreshortened WD logo in the blue triangle.
    However, the SATA and power connectors are on the far side of the drive and I don't think they're supposed to be bulky, so you can't see if they're actually plugged in.

    On the other hand, 5 of the 6 SATA sockets on the motherboard clearly have no cables inserted.
    The upper right corner of the 6th socket (SATA6G_1) is peeking out behind a cable bundle,
    and it's debatable whether that 6th socket could have a cable plugged in that's visually obscured.

    In any case...
    MyGaming: Different types of SSDs explained – SATA vs M.2 vs PCIe
    (21-Jun'17)

    The only WD SSDs in the Blue product line in M.2 form-factor are SATA drives - not PCIe.

    The only 500GB PCIe SSDs that WD sells currently are a "WD Blue SN500 NVMe SSD",
    and a "WD_BLACK SN750 NVMe SSD" - both only available in M.2 form-factor.

    So if your system ships with a 2½" WD Blue SSD, it's SATA.

    (Which is obvious as of the 2017 article, which only admitted 2½" form-factor drives with SATA interfaces. That may still be true, but WD's current products conform to that rule of thumb regardless).


    I checked, and my M.2 SSD is SATA (6GB/s) not PCIe (32GB/s). However, both of my M.2 sockets
    support PCIe devices (and remarkably, only one of the two - the empty one - subsumes a SATA socket if occupied by a PCIe device).
     
  17. DispositionMatrix

    DispositionMatrix NES Member

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    1995.
     
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  18. Prepper

    Prepper NES Member

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    Indeed, it was easier then. Burlington used to have this hole in the wall shop called Commlink (next to Gentle Dental if that's still there). I'd walk in, chat with some nice Chinese guys and ask questions, tell them exactly what I wanted and 15 minutes later they had the system built. No one can do that today. As far as I know, that shop is gone.
     
  19. Prepper

    Prepper NES Member

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    Anyway, I had sent a message last night to IBuyPower asking some details about the storage questions on that machine. No response yet. This is not encouraging.
     
  20. drgrant

    drgrant Moderator NES Member

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    With the amount of time you've spent, you probably could have driven to microcenter, talked to some pimply faced youth for about 20 minutes, put some cash down and you'd be ready to pick the thing up already... or at least brought home a box of stuff to put together, and you're not an idiot, so worst case it'd be about a 3 hour build.

    -Mike
     
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  21. Prepper

    Prepper NES Member

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    I thought of them. LONG ago, I used to go there once in a while, when I lived closer to Cambridge. If they can still do builds while I wait, perhaps I should pay them a visit sometime.
     
  22. drgrant

    drgrant Moderator NES Member

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    I dunno if they'll do that (unless you call ahead?) I do know, however, that can walk in, and in under an hour, have a cart full of stuff you need. Their intel CPU prices are still low enough that they beat online prices. A friend of mine who is a mega skinflint, he used to drive down from Jaffrey to Cambridge just to buy CPUs from them.

    I would get a Samsung SSD and some kind of case thats friendly to work on and holds as many disks as you need it to hold. Motherboards and CPUs are always subjective (the staff at MC can help) but I have a rule where I will spend up to like $435 on an intel CPU, because that's what I paid for my Pentium 166 chip and that was the most I had ever paid for a CPU. To this day, I have found that the law of diminishing returns oddly enough, still strikes right around that point.

    PCs are a lot easier to put together than they were even 10 years ago, though. A lot of connectors and such have become standardized.

    -Mike
     
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  23. Prepper

    Prepper NES Member

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    What about this?

    PowerSpec G355 Gaming Desktop PC - Micro Center

    It actually describes what is in it, including useful details like this:
    EXPANSION BAYS
    External 5.25" Bays (Available) 2
    External 5.25" Bays (Total) 2
    Internal 3.5" Bays (Total) 3
    Internal 3.5" Bays (Available) 3

    Oddly, it doesn't say how many SATA connectors are on the motherboard though.
     
  24. Dench

    Dench

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    I just built a mini-itx gaming rig in a portable case which I'll attach to this post. The entire thing was sub $1,000 and it scores well in benchmarks for it's price point and very well considering the size of the case and the fact it has 2 fans.

    I'm not exactly sure why you have so much interest in adding a shit ton of storage to your rig. The desktop I'm on now has 2 M.2's and a random HDD I had left over from an old computer. On site storage that's not backed up to the cloud or on an array is a mega big dumb mistake to make. I believe I've stepped on that landmine at least twice in the past 20 years.

    You shouldnt buy anything over an i5 in Intel land unless you are running a program that specifically utilizes all the extra shit that the 7 and 9 does. Intel has also finally achieved it's goal which is to become a blatantly bad choice compared to AMD. The new mini itx rig I've made has an Ryzen 5 2600X that was $144. I had to buy a low profile CPU cooler to fit into this case, though. An Intel i7 would be over $300 and again if you don't need it you'll never notice the difference. 2 rigs ago I splurged on an i7 and it was a complete waste of money.

    AMD is also offering decent competition to nvidia in video card land. I did end up getting a GTX 1660 Ti that is very short to fit into the case. It runs about as fast as my GTX 1070 on this computer.

    Also went with an M.2 for obvious reasons. People not using those are just punishing themselves. The M.2 I'm using is PCIexpress 3 x4. The drive is rated at 2,000/1,750mb


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    Also the board you are looking at that you can't find the SATA info for has 6 SATA and 3 M.2 slots. Enough to drive you completely f***ing insane.
    ASRock Z390 Pro4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard



    Laptops suck when compared to desktops in everything but portability. You may be satisfied with your laptop, but the equivalent value desktop would suplex your laptop into the dumpster.

    laptops don't last. Which is another key problem. Specifically powerful ones. Ask me how I know. My $2,200 laptop just died 2 weeks ago 3 months out of warranty. Board shorted. 15 years ago my $3,250 laptop never worked correctly a single day in it's life until it died for good 18 months old, with about 6 months spent at the repair depot.

    If you're running 2 screens on a Lenovo P50 that has a Quadro M1000M and it's working it's only because you are probably using both screens to make stick figures in MS paint.
    If the heat doesnt kill them something will eventually short. Or bump it. Or in my case, will die while idle on the desk. Great.

    Macbooks die like no ones business. And apple will charge you one human organ per repair. I've seen many, many macs die. And the hotter the room it's in, the faster shits going south. The video card on my ~1,000 mini ITX rig isnt even from the same universe.

    UserBenchmark: Nvidia GTX 1660-Ti vs Quadro 1000M

    [rofl]

    You can stop wondering why people don't use laptops so much
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2019 at 6:50 PM
  25. Prepper

    Prepper NES Member

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    NH
    Not a shit ton, just the ones I already have. So I'd prefer they go in the new PC if it can take them. I have a brand new 1TB SSD that I tried upgrading to Windows 10 on, only to discover that it won't work out. Well, I can't return the drive now, already used it. So, it needs to go somewhere. There's also the older 1TB SSD that my current PC boots off of. I guess I could leave it in the old PC as a backup PC I use for some other dedicated purpose like manage my cameras or serve up movies from the Plex server. I haven't decided yet. I also have a 1TB HDD which I understand is barely worth more than $20 new these days, so I don't necessarily mind parting with that. But, if it can go somewhere, I'd prefer to stick it somewhere. It works fine.

    So, that leaves me at the very minimum I must be able to have the boot disk as well as one additional bay that takes a 2.5" form factor. It would also be good if I made sure what the boot disk was in case I want to replace it someday... I don't want to discover they soldered a M.2 stick onto the motherboard or something stupid like that. And, preferably I'd want to put a second additional drive in it, perhaps a large one like 6TB someday. Boot disk is for OS and installed programs (and the various temp dirs and all that which are required). All user files I put on another disk. It's what I've been doing for a long time and I prefer to keep this pattern as it works out well for me. It lets me swap out the boot disk, or reformat it and reinstall Windows, without breaking everything.

    As for backups, I pay for a service called sync.com. Anything I put in a certain folder on my D drive automatically gets copied in encrypted form to the cloud. I put nearly all files on there, with only a few exceptions for stupid apps that insist on saving their data in c:\users\...\AppData... pain in the butt! I hate software that stores the important stuff in there and makes it difficult to keep elsewhere. Every so often, I also take an external USB drive and copy everything from my sync.com dir to it, plus the misc crap that's in AppData. I have 2 of them, so I can put one of them in the safe deposit box while the other remains at home. All encrypted with VeraCrypt of course... I don't need a USB drive theft to cause my data to be in someone else's hands.
     
  26. Dench

    Dench

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    Almost all ATX cases will have a lot of 3.5 drive bays for your old HDD. And then you can just use the trays that most come with for the SSDs. The M.2 should not be soldered onto the board. It just goes in the slot and one screw holds it in. All m.2's arent created equal and the ones that are cheap are cheap for a reason.

    You can do this sub 1k all day with a Windows license and have it last you for years. It's a very simple and straightforward project.
     
  27. drgrant

    drgrant Moderator NES Member

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    The problem with cloud shit is it's slow, and unless you're already doing so, you have to pay for that storage somehow. Arrays are their own ball of trash unless you want to drop money on a good nas and a bunch of matching disks to go with it. Done too cheaply, raid is worse than just having loose disks. My torrent/server
    box has a bunch of locally attached disks to it, runs just fine, although most of the storage is not inside the box. I do have cloud shit but that's for shit I can't afford to lose, and I am lucky enough to be an admin on a few gapps
    domains so I have unlimited drive storage....

    I still f***ing hate AMD because of all the money I wasted on them being a fanboi. I'm still pissed at them because of their rinky dink chipsets up until recently. Maybe in 5 years I'll reconsider. You could say I'm very bitter about my GPUs not working right in the KT133A chipsets, etc.... AMD hedged a lot of their future on 3rd parties and it bit
    them in the ass. I used to be an AMD VAR back in the day, too. That ended. Things have changed but I'm still of the mind that AMD is only in business to keep intel from getting busted on antitrust, will always be a greasy hippy skinflint chip, etc. Perhaps I will look at a Ryzen but only if there is a motherboard/chipset that's not a joke.

    -Mike
     
  28. AHM

    AHM NES Member

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    Well now that's a funny question.
    Because I could swear I'd posted about that precise system.
    Guess I diked out a bunch of stuff before posting.

    The G355 is the upsell of our new desktop system, the B742.
    For $350 more, you get a $349.99 video card, but no $16.99 DVD drive.
    Do you need a $350 video card,
    or are the VGA, DVI-D, and HDMI ports on the motherboard enough?


    [wave]
     
    Prepper likes this.
  29. Spanz

    Spanz NES Member

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    its hard to not like any of the new NVIDIA graphics cards.
     
  30. Varmint

    Varmint NES Member

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    Don't get hung up on the interfaces. It's like a speed limit. Do you care if the speed limit is 55 mph or 75 mph when you're riding a bicycle? The speed of the drive is what's important, and with SSDs it's unlikely you'll notice the differences, they're all fast these days.
     
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