1. If you enjoy the forum please consider supporting it by signing up for a NES Membership  The benefits pay for the membership many times over.

  2. Dismiss Notice

What's a good place to order a custom PC?

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Prepper, Feb 10, 2019.

  1. Varmint

    Varmint NES Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2014
    Messages:
    10,285
    Likes Received:
    2,828
    Location:
    North Shore, MA
    What makes a desktop quiet is either sound insulation on the case, or large quiet fans (the larger the fan, the quieter it is, generally). Gaming PCs may have both features, and if you're not gaming they'll be very quiet. I built my own, and used a Corsair 550D, which is a quiet case. It's my favorite component. You can specify quiet cases I think at these custom sites.
     

  2. gokeeffe

    gokeeffe

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2012
    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    19
    Location:
    Las Vegas
    With how much power you can pack into a laptop these days, I don’t understand why anybody would buy a desktop anymore. You don’t seem price sensitive with the specs you’re listing.

    I custom ordered a Lenovo P50 laptop last year with 32GB or RAM, dual e2 SSDs with a RAID 1 controller, and a bunch of other stuff nobody cares about. With the dock it works just like a desktop machine, but you can undock it and use it a laptop too. It’s my personal development machine and it has been awesome. I’ve had t series and w series thinkpads too. Pretty much all the W series ones I’ve encountered were really terrible. The T series were hit and miss for me.

    I wouldn’t rule out a Mac/MacBook either if they would work for you. I’ve had Macs for years and they are a lot more reliable than Windows machines. OSx is really just a very user friendly version of Linux which makes it pretty powerful when you want to start doing off the wall stuff. I’ve only killed one MacBook Pro in the past 10 years, while I’ve left a trail of broken thinkpads in my wake. Takes a bit of getting used to for sure, but they’ve been good to me.

    If you are going to play games and watch movies, 4K monitors make sense. If they’re for work and you want usable resolution, I would go for 1440p monitors. You won’t be able to run a 4K monitor at native resolution unless you get a 32” one. Anything smaller and you won’t be able to read anything on it. I run dual 1440p monitors (one set of 25 inch monitors and one set of 27 inch monitors). I would argue dual 25s are perfect. Dual 27s are a bit too wide imho. My machines can run dual 1440p monitors at 60hz. Going to dual 4ks, it would drop to 30hz. You can feel the difference between 30hz and 60hz when you spend all day in front of them.

    I will agree having one of those giant curved monitors would be sweet, but after doing the math, I got a lot more useable desktop space with my current setup.
     
  3. AHM

    AHM NES Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2013
    Messages:
    3,939
    Likes Received:
    1,834
    If you have to have someone build a custom PC for you,
    a couple of the Big Boys at Digital Spit Brook had APEX Computers
    in Sun Plaza opposite PLM do it for them with no complaints.
    They probably had six-figure incomes to throw at it back in the day,
    but they'd have bitched if their home systems didn't work.
     
  4. CrackPot

    CrackPot NES Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2011
    Messages:
    2,980
    Likes Received:
    1,126
    Location:
    Worcester County
    While you are not building a gaming machine, this website is still useful to determine what parts to buy and what is a good value

    Logical Increments, the PC Builder's Friend

    Build yourself. If you are not buying a Dell out of the catalog, build it yourself.

    Pick a price point, buy everything except the graphics which you can downgrade a couple notches based on purpose and call it a day.
     
  5. drgrant

    drgrant Moderator NES Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2006
    Messages:
    63,969
    Likes Received:
    18,287
    Laptops have absolute shit TCO vs time. I cringe when I have idiot customers that are obsessed with laptops (that don't actually need laptops) because I know that in the long run they're going to get screwed. On top of this, A lot of times they will skinflint too and they buy consumer shit which is often slow, heavy, or poorly made and rarely last more than a few years... yes if you buy an enterprise-grade machine you usually doing better off but it's still a f***ing laptop AKA something you're never going to be able to repair yourself after the 3 year warranty is up.... laptops have almost zero salvage value as well when they go tits up, you basically get to pull the SSD out and throw the machine away... a lot of the cheap shit I refuse to even open it at this point unless it's a salvage op.

    I have a laptop because I need it... if I didn't use it mobile there's no way in hell I would own a single laptop.

    Also running a laptop at home with a tiny screen is stupid when you can buy a desktop that cost half as much with a screen 3-4x as large that isn't being wasted doing nothing.. [laugh]

    -Mike
     
    Varmint and Prepper like this.
  6. Golddiggie

    Golddiggie NES Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2012
    Messages:
    12,448
    Likes Received:
    2,769
    Location:
    Pelham, NH
    @drgrant I used to get desktops/towers (or build them) but have switched to laptops several years back. For one thing, I'm not longer tied to a single location at home to use it. I also don't skinflint on what I get. My last one was bought almost four years back and the main reason I'll be getting a new one is it's shitty battery. It's on the third one now (one replaced under warranty at under a year, second one I replaced). I'll never buy from that maker again due to the short warranty option and crappy battery used.
    I am looking at getting a new Lenovo laptop (ThinkPad) this year. Not sure what I'll do with the current one. When I'm not using it for more intense tasks, the 14" display (higher resolution) does fine for me. Then again, I build it with the desired use in mind and a 3-5 year trouble free use life. I'll confirm that this is still true, but in the last I've extended the warranty on laptops before, after purchase. Right now I'm looking at the better coverage for at least three years (they let you go out to five). In five years there's a good chance newer processors will have a different pin configuration so you wouldn't be able to just drop one into a desktop either.

    For the OP, just be sure whatever you end up has a solid warranty for at least three years. Make sure they will come to your location for repairs and not make you ship it out (on your dime) for repairs. Any system that only offers a one year warranty should be avoided at all costs.
     
  7. drgrant

    drgrant Moderator NES Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2006
    Messages:
    63,969
    Likes Received:
    18,287
    Yes, I get it, but most of the people I'm talking about don't move their machine at all. It sits in one place and makes a dust ring.... [rofl] The only time it's "mobile" is when I stop to pick it up, for the HDD recovery when
    it stops working. Then there's the "couch and pillow suffocation crew" types that probably use their laptop while on the toilet or something. These people leave their machines on comforters to suffocate, egg out power connectors, etc.

    Also, intentionally working off a 14/15/17 inch screen is still just masochism. we tolerate it for the sake of mobility but it doesn't make it any less insane. It's like being at home and taking a bath in the sink because the half bathroom is closer to the living room than the master bath... [rofl] It'd be like infantry carrying HANDGUNS ONLY into combat.

    -Mike
     
  8. drgrant

    drgrant Moderator NES Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2006
    Messages:
    63,969
    Likes Received:
    18,287
    Food for thought.... I have customers with laptops and desktops. The desktops ALWAYS go 5-10 years, almost like clockwork. Maybe you might lose one power supply along the way but even that doesn't happen that often. Right now I am finishing up retiring a bunch of desktops made around 2008 or so. Most laptops will be lucky to make 5 years unless cared for well. Not to mention with a desktop if you buy a decent display it'll last even longer than the machine, and the laptop forces you to throw it away.

    -Mike
     
    Varmint likes this.
  9. Prepper

    Prepper NES Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2007
    Messages:
    16,496
    Likes Received:
    4,333
    Location:
    NH
    My desktop is 8 years old left on 24 hours a day. I do have a new cheap laptop, mainly because I need to bring it with me to help Mom out with stuff like doing her taxes. It is a Lenovo 330 with a tiny 128GB SSD for $350, but it is surprisingly fast. Camera sucks though (looks like a web cam from about 1995) but I don't use it.
     
  10. Golddiggie

    Golddiggie NES Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2012
    Messages:
    12,448
    Likes Received:
    2,769
    Location:
    Pelham, NH
    I have a 32" 1440p resolution display on my desk for when I use a laptop there. Either my own, or the one from work. I'm thinking about getting a second one and wall mounting both. Just need to be 100% sure I'll be able to chain them, or have a dock to feed them both.

    IF I was looking to Gam, do CAD or something else that needed more raw power, I'd get/build a tower. At this point I'm not doing any of that. Plus the version of Photoshop I have runs great on the i7 processor in mu current laptop. I expect it to be the same with the next one. I would be longer between purchases of laptops IF the one I have now didn't have such flaws. I'll never get one from that maker ever again.

    I've had much better luck with Lenovo and Dell systems. Even the laptops. Plus we get a pretty heavy discount on both due to where I'm working.

    To be fair, I use my laptop most on the couch, but at least a couple nights a week I take it up to my desk. I can also feed my 55" 4k tv from it. :)
     
  11. Spanz

    Spanz NES Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2009
    Messages:
    25,424
    Likes Received:
    9,912
    i have a lenova y520 laptop. I get maybe 1 hour of battery life. it sux.
    IF you get a laptop with a fast processor and a good nvidia graphics card....it is not going to have good battery life, period!

    did i mention it weights five tons too!
     
  12. Varmint

    Varmint NES Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2014
    Messages:
    10,285
    Likes Received:
    2,828
    Location:
    North Shore, MA
    If I travel for work I connect the laptop to the hotel TV to watch Netflix or something, but a lot of hotels especially in the US have it set up so you can’t connect an outside source, at least I can’t figure out how.
     
  13. VTski4x4

    VTski4x4 NES Member

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2012
    Messages:
    657
    Likes Received:
    515
    Ibuypower.com
     
  14. DeadEyeDan

    DeadEyeDan NES Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2019
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    19
    Location:
    Boston
    I used Computer Upgrade Kings to build a mid range gaming laptop for myself last year, went through the website a got the build I wanted for $159 less then Amazon plus they throw in a very nice Case/Backpack, and a bunch of extras for free.

    17.3 144Mhz Display
    I7 - 6 core / 12 threads
    32 Gb 2600 MHz RAM
    1 TB SSD
    2 TB HDD
    1070 8 Gb GPU
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2019
  15. Golddiggie

    Golddiggie NES Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2012
    Messages:
    12,448
    Likes Received:
    2,769
    Location:
    Pelham, NH
    IME, gaming laptops, used to game on, are most often plugged in. When not using the discreet graphics card, they use the Intel graphics. At least the one I have does. I also wouldn't buy another laptop that only has an internal battery. The ThinkPad T series (at least) has an internal and external so you can change out one of them easily. Get the coverage that replaced a under spec battery and you should be gtg.

    I've not yet decided if getting the discreet graphics is what I'll need in the next laptop.
     
  16. drgrant

    drgrant Moderator NES Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2006
    Messages:
    63,969
    Likes Received:
    18,287
    This is what we call a consumer shitbrick machine unfortunately. A while ago they had this new kid in purchasing at work and some a**h*** actually ordered one of those things and they allowed it to go through. Not the exact same model number but pretty close.... it was literally the worst brand new laptop that ever entered my office. The hinges squeaked and the whole case of the machine felt like it was going to crack at any moment.... the speakers made weird noises, a bunch of other weird shit happened, and on top of all that it didn't even have a f***ing TPM chip in it so we had to reject it and send it back.... then they bought a different one thank God....
     
  17. weekendracer

    weekendracer

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2009
    Messages:
    3,187
    Likes Received:
    906
    Location:
    Louisiana
    Pretty sure the .gov is moving towards cloud storage with 365. Can't wait for that data breach. I had to use Google Chrome to access a secure database. Google. Chrome.

    Let that sink in.
     
  18. Spanz

    Spanz NES Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2009
    Messages:
    25,424
    Likes Received:
    9,912
    yeah i got sucked in. Was at a costco, saw the giant screen, had a good graphics card, good processor, good memory, and was on sale. Impulse buy without doing any research. Gawd, what a mistake.
     
  19. Greschner 4

    Greschner 4

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2013
    Messages:
    2,811
    Likes Received:
    468
    I'll get flamed, but I always buy the Dell (Fixed) Precisions. I customize them to my liking (after 10 modifications to the design to review the math) then request 23-25% off the
    (the already 35% bullshit marketing discount) which, after some bitching, is always approved by the manager.
     
    drgrant likes this.
  20. ThePreBanMan

    ThePreBanMan NES Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2012
    Messages:
    6,742
    Likes Received:
    2,035
    Location:
    A Fair Haven in an unfair state.
    It's not really like that though. You are right about consumer vs business though. But laptops can drive just as many external displays as any desktop (assuming you get a business class unit with the proper docking station / port replicator). I fix them myself all the time. Although I don't fix many these days since we switched from Dell and Lenovo to HP. Most of the failures we see now are the external power bricks or hard drives and admittedly the bricks are from lack of care. People drop em or whatever. We have very good luck with Elitebooks. Failure rate after 5 years of service is that wasn't the fault of the user (dropping it, etc) is less than 1%.

    Laptops also have another advantage over a desktop... a built-in UPS. If you're thinking of 24/7 operation that's something to consider. On a desktop absent a UPS you could be looking at data corruption. This is especially true with SSDs although they've gotten better. Laptops also consume far less electricity and are quieter.

    One thing I don't like about them though is their keyboards. Depending on the size you may or may not have a number pad and the keyboards aren't so standardized. Some have the end key in one spot, some in another. Some you have to hit the Function button to make another key become end, that sort of stuff. Seems they all do things differently with the keys outside of the standard letters and numbers.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2019
  21. Varmint

    Varmint NES Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2014
    Messages:
    10,285
    Likes Received:
    2,828
    Location:
    North Shore, MA
    Let's hope they don't use the motherboards with built-in Chinese tracking chips.
     
    AHM likes this.
  22. drgrant

    drgrant Moderator NES Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2006
    Messages:
    63,969
    Likes Received:
    18,287
    I never said the machines wouldn't drive an external display, it's just that if someone isn't moving the machine around, they're not getting any use out of the display in the laptop, and it'll get flushed when the laptop
    goes, if there is no need for portability, it's still just setting cash on fire. Then you have this octupus of crap on your desk or at best, on a shelf above it, even with a port replicator. Desktops can sit on the floor or
    behind shit, out of the way. At least dell port replicators are cheap on ebay, I'll give them that much credit.... I think the ones for mine cost 20 bucks apiece.

    People abuse laptops, I deploy all the laptops where I work and even the people who are "nicer" to their machines still abuse them. The machines invite abuse and accidents. Of course in some cases its just hardware QC BS, for example, Apples have this nasty habit of blowing up just out of warranty. The dells tend to stay in service longer depending on what model they bought, but usually by the time 5 years comes around the machine has been handed down to another user, etc. The other problem we have is even though there's a limited number of machines they can buy, I have no way of overruling it.... so we get people buying shitboxes like Dell XPS etc. Ugh. They're OK but not nearly as rugged as the lats are. Laptop fans also ingest shit and clog easier, but at least that's not usually too hard to fix assuming you get the machine back before it gets totally roasted.

    Also WRT abuse.... if I spill a beverage in my desktop keyboard I am out 50 bucks at worse. If I spill it into a laptop, the machine is pretty much done, or at least I will never trust it again. I've spent too many years
    doing surgery on laptops that had liquid spills and nearly all of them were a bad scene. My favorites were when a laptop fetish user had a house full of dogs and snotgobblers running around, especially after I told them not to buy a laptop (because of that reason). I don't pull the "atodaso" card on them but I usually casually mentioned that if they had a desktop, it would have survived that crap.

    The other thing is servicing. I can service a desktop PC for a hardware issue and get it back online quickly and for short money usually. Good luck doing that with a laptop, laptop surgery is a pain in the ass. In my 2nd job I don't even do it anymore unless its a data recovery gig, because there's no money in it otherwise and then as soon as you crack the thing open you're married to it unless the customer has already written it off as a loss. Plus parts are a pain in the ass and harder to come by, or sometimes you have to buy too much crap to fix one minor problem. Thankfully at my day job we force them to get an extended warranty... rarely have to crack open a machine unless its out of coverage.

    All of these things lead to laptop TCO = still pretty much pure shit. They are a necessary evil as far as I'm concerned. I have a great machine (Precision M7710) don't get me wrong, but I only have it because I use the thing mobile. Like actually mobile, like 3-10 times a month... OUTSIDE my house. [laugh] If it wasn't for the fact that I needed that utility/mobility, and the fact that it generates revenue for my side business, it wouldn't be around, or I'd have a really hard time justifying its existence. About the only time I've seen a home user where a laptop was really justified was my cousin's apartment, she is elderly and downsized her apartment to a studio, and the entire place is about the size of a shoebox and she has a sewing table that's sized accordingly... if you put even a micro desktop on it, it would swallow up the whole thing. She can turn the laptop off and put it in a drawer or something when it's not being used.

    Meh, todays desktops use hardly any power, although the UPS argument has some merit. The days of power sucking PCs are gone, unless it's a gaming rig, a big workstation, or an AMD box or some trash like that. Hell the machines I just retired used well under 100W, mostly opti 745s and 755s. You'll never get the money back on electricity with the laptop unless it sleeps constantly or something. And if someone is that much of a skinflint they can sleep a PC too if they really wanted to, the desktops have gotten a lot better with that stuff, although I still disable it as a matter of course outside of sleeping the monitor.

    Yes.... Laptop keyboards these days are f***ing terrible. The worst on the market by far is apple's newest keyboards on the MBP, the keys have no throw and your fingers literally hurt, and the key pitch is all f***ed up and causes typos galore. Dell and Lenovo have some keyboards I can tolerate, but they're all pretty much trash compared to the keyboard that I had on my Thinkpad 770ED that some shithead stole out of my
    car a few eons ago... but that's because IBM actually obeyed the ISO spec it probably helped develop for PC laptops, standards for travel, pitch, etc. Typing on a 770 is almost magical compared to the garbage boards on
    laptops now. Basically whenever I'm on a laptop my speed probably drops by an easy 10% depending on how bad it is. The dells I'm not too bad on, but it's still dumb, the logitechs on my desktops are still way better and they're far from being the "best" desktop keyboards, probably only B+ grade.

    -Mike
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2019
  23. drgrant

    drgrant Moderator NES Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2006
    Messages:
    63,969
    Likes Received:
    18,287
    The precisions are solid for the most part, I have one at home as a torrent box/server. My only bitch about the whole thing is their raid controller at least on the 7610 is a piece of shit and shit itself. I just run all the storage
    external now except for an SSD boot drive that I rigged up so it runs off the mobo controller...

    Then again I hate RAID and RAID hates me so I'm not shocked that happened. [rofl]

    -Mike
     
  24. whatluck

    whatluck

    Joined:
    May 31, 2009
    Messages:
    7,307
    Likes Received:
    2,067
    Location:
    Braintree, MA
    Lol, software RAID. Not even once.

    Hardware RAID is awesome though.
     
  25. drgrant

    drgrant Moderator NES Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2006
    Messages:
    63,969
    Likes Received:
    18,287
    Nope, mine was hardware raid, and it failed. It's actually a card in the 7610, has its own bios and everything.. All the targets on it just f***ing disappeared, for no reason. . I pulled the disks and
    the disks were fine.

    Every bad experience I've had with raid has either been a motherboard controller or a PCI controller. I'm not suicidal enough to run software raid, ever.... [laugh] I'd rather go without and just live off backups.

    IMHO raid controllers being shit in servers is a small part of the reason companies like Netapp etc. sell lots of boxes.... because that shit generally doesn't break, and has built in redundancy... of course we're talking an
    exponential increase in cost... [laugh]

    -Mike
     
  26. AHM

    AHM NES Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2013
    Messages:
    3,939
    Likes Received:
    1,834
    Laptops:
    The Bride has a work laptop that she carries home half the nights and all weekends
    to do work from home. No real personal apps/files on it,
    but it doubles as an in-kitchen cruise ship webcam monitor,
    cruisemomblog web client, and Freecell server.

    She's careening towards job evaporation next summer,
    and says she will be getting a home laptop. I'm sure I dread it croaking,
    but it probably is best - we can't set up a desktop on the kitchen table,
    and she can take the laptop on vacations.

    I figure that as long as I get her a hard work surface
    so the vinyl tablecloth doesn't block fan ports,
    and the system is shut off when not in use,
    it should be light duty.

    But yeah, I'm reading this thread and moaning.

    RAID:
    I know two technical guys that had hardware RAID (redundancy not speed),
    where one of the drives failed and the system never complained.
    They found out when the other drive failed.
    And then they were scrod.

    The one guy lost the new year's worth of dues records from
    membership renewals of his club (many hundreds of members).
    Cost him $300-$400 to have a data recovery service hoover the files
    off one of the roached drives. (But at least that worked).

    The other guy had this happen twice to embedded systems at work.
    He wonders whether there's something about RAID cards that exercises the drives
    in a way that drastically shortens their lifetime.
    In his case maybe the hard drives his company was using sucked,
    but that's 3 identical incidents spread across two use cases.

    Maybe the bigger lesson is that if you're using RAID to save your bacon from
    hard drive failure, RTFM to make sure that your system will tell you in no uncertain terms
    when the first drive in a RAID set starts flaking out.


    I run a SMART monitor in my desktop PC system tray.
    But my first and only hint that an (internal SATA) 2TB data drive was failing,
    was an unexpected "so you've (un/re)plugged a USB device" sound.
    And I emphasize: they're not USB drives.

    No little animated clown juggling over to the system tray and nodding at the icon,
    no dialog box, not even a change in icon color.
    But click on the icon and the line item says Drive Not Happy.
    Gee thanks, SMART icon.


    That's cause you're not the kinda person to do that.
     
    drgrant likes this.
  27. Prepper

    Prepper NES Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2007
    Messages:
    16,496
    Likes Received:
    4,333
    Location:
    NH
    I can't help with serious business use as I'm not a real IT guy, but for home use or clubs or other small uses, my backup solution is as follows. I simply pay the annual fee to Sync.com for 2TB of storage. I specify a single folder on my HD to be the one that's synchronized to this service. And, anything I need backed up goes there and gets copied within a few minutes after being updated. (Most of the "My Documents" folder is empty and I just have a shortcut to this sync dir.) I chose Sync.com because it is end to end encryption and the cloud servers never see the unencrypted files. (Although, I guess they do see the file names so perhaps I should stop naming files things like "list of people to kill.xls"... just kidding...)

    Meanwhile, every few months or so I copy everything to a USB drive that I first encrypted with Veracrypt, so that anyone who gets my backup disk sees nothing. I have 2 such USB drives, one of which I keep in the safe deposit box, and I swap them each time I do a backup.
     
    AHM likes this.
  28. Golddiggie

    Golddiggie NES Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2012
    Messages:
    12,448
    Likes Received:
    2,769
    Location:
    Pelham, NH
    Concerning RAID and drives... I was using a PERC 6 controller in a Dell precision workstation for some time with enterprise class drives connected (not desktop drives) and had no issues with it. I was also going RAID 1 (redundancy, not speed) but still never had a drive fail or the controller shat itself.

    I'm using a QNAP NAS now (5 drive version bought around 2009) with NAS grade drives (made for 24x7 operation). I was using desktop drives, but had a failure sometime in late October (2018) and decided to get all NAS drives on a Black Friday deal. The NAS is set to email me whenever something happens such as a fault/issue (to two different email addresses to make sure I get the notification). Something had gone wrong with the config for the previous alert, since I never saw it. I've confirmed it works now though. I also have that set to RAID 6, so I'm protected for up to two drive faults before I'm SOL. I plan to order either one, or two, identical drives to what's in it now, to have on hand in case I need to replace them. By the time the drives are out of warranty, I should have a newer device in place that will take over at least some of it's duties.

    IMO/IME, if you have a RAID setup it should be configured to send off a message (email or text) when an event happens so that you at least know about it.

    For desktops, or laptops, I don't bother with RAID anymore. I do make sure to back up my data periodically though (to the NAS most of the time, or to cloud storage). Just remember the old saying "one is none, two is one"... Or NSPOF (no single point of failure)...
     
    AHM likes this.
  29. AHM

    AHM NES Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2013
    Messages:
    3,939
    Likes Received:
    1,834
    Norton Ghost makes an incremental backup of my C: drive to a separate internal hard drive every night at 3:15AM. I maintain pseudo-logarithmic backups - all the dailies for the past week, all the weeklies for the past month, all the monthlies for the past quarter, all the quarterlies for the past year. (Deleting incremental Ghost savesets pushes the unique changed files into the oldest undeleted saveset in the series, but tossing files that had changed again). I'm gobsmacked that the last time I looked, no one seems to have implemented merging incremental savesets like that in tar(1).

    Every time we leave the house for a weekend, I use Windows SyncToy to copy crucial files from crucial directories to a thumb drive that travels with us. It's actually a pretty good app.
     
  30. Varmint

    Varmint NES Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2014
    Messages:
    10,285
    Likes Received:
    2,828
    Location:
    North Shore, MA
    Are you guys spooks or something? All we have on our home PC are our photos/videos, Turbotax files and my pron surfing history. I only care about the family photos/videos, which I backup to a 2TB My Passport. (I back up everything to that, but don't care that much about the other stuff).
     

Share This Page