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Updating electrical switches

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by andy t, Sep 10, 2019.

  1. Coyote33

    Coyote33

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    The line running out to my garage was interesting when I bought the house. I followed it back, and the connection was right above my oil tank. It was a spiral metal conduit, with wiring inside; this went to all I can say it was a lamp fixture with a pull-chain, with a two-prong extension cord plug, then wired into romex, which went out under my back steps/walk, and wound up in the garage. This was off a shared connection, feeding basement lights and who knows what else (sump pump? dehumidifier?).

    I had an electrician friend remove the nuttiness, and put this on its own run. On the garage side, he put a GFCI outlet, which then fed another outlet and the lights and electric garage door opener. This has served well going forward.
     
  2. albythewhitey

    albythewhitey

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    you could use a duplex toggle switch to get 4 loads off a two gang? personally i wouldnt do this but just throwing the idea out there :D
     
  3. namedpipes

    namedpipes NES Member

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    I have several outbuildings on the southern end of the property. When I bought the place, they were wired with overhead knob and tube wires with knife blade switches in the buildings. Yes they were live and were among my first fixes.

    To be clear, the wires were strung through the air with ceramic insulators tying then to the buildings. I guess they were safe enough. Nothing burned down in the 100 or so years they'd been like that.
     
  4. Rob Boudrie

    Rob Boudrie NES Member

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    Why not just daisy chain the loads?
     
  5. Palladin

    Palladin NES Member

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    OP still alive?
     
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  6. Spanz

    Spanz NES Member

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    i had about 20 feet of knob and tube in the building i am renovating now. But it had been screwed with...stuff added...and they say the knob and tube is ok, but the moment you screw with it, trouble happens.

    I deactivated all the existing wiring, and we are rewiring with a new panel. Can not be sure what is hidden in the walls.
     
  7. Energizer

    Energizer NES Member

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    Sounds like my house. Still finding stuff like this buried in my circa-1940 walls or in ceilings 18 yrs after buying the place. I've replaced the main panel and have been slowly rewiring when it makes sense. Old, cloth insulated 2-wire armored cable with soldered connections, metal lath concrete plaster walls, and full dimension "hard-as-a-rock" heartwood balloon framing construction makes even the smallest fix or alteration a nightmare.
     
  8. Coyote33

    Coyote33

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    My kitchen has a fan next to the light. When I bought the place, it had an old fan and the old circline fluorescent light. I replace both, but separately, so still 2 connections/boxes/switches. When I pulled one of them, there was a baby food jar pushed up into the ceiling, with a ton of wires going into it, all electrical taped together. I think I had my electrician friend take care of that as well. There is another one, an outlet, and an outlet overlapping it. Yes, the plastic plate is cut so they are kind of overlapping. I think they did that to put the new (70's? 80's?) microwave on its own circuit. Maybe for dishwasher? There are also switches that do nothing in the living room. I'm guessing sconces that are now buried somewhere.
     
  9. MisterHappy

    MisterHappy NES Member

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    On the 16 yard line, shootin' for the Lewis!
    A relative has a Colonial-style house in Concord (modern, not a Real Colonial, bear in mind....)

    She was doing a remodel, and was having trouble finding "colonial" switchplates. I explained that during Colonial times, they didn't have switchplates, as they didn't have switches, either. [laugh]

    Sometimes, I'm not helpful.
     
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  10. MisterHappy

    MisterHappy NES Member

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    On the 16 yard line, shootin' for the Lewis!
  11. MisterHappy

    MisterHappy NES Member

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    Back in the late 80's/early 90's, I was talking with the Gas Man, who was doing a meter swap at my parents' house in Arlington. He told me there was a Little Old Lady in the town, who lived in a house that had never been wired for electricity: Gas light, gas refrigerator, etc. She apparently was of the opinion that it had worked so far, so why change? [laugh]
     
  12. Coyote33

    Coyote33

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    Reminds me of the Wong Dynasty in Holden. It is the only Chinese restaurant I know of that is set in a Colonial atmosphere. (It used to be the Christmas Tree Inn, and the William Paul House before that.)
     
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  13. namedpipes

    namedpipes NES Member

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    There have been a couple houses in NH I had my eye on at times, both 150+ yo and never wired or plumbed. If I were single... Of course I'm not, but I would be again if I did buy a house with outdoor privy and oil lamps...

    The sheds you parked the trailer by are the ones that had the overhead knob and tube. (One day I'll get it over to Bill's place [laugh])
     
  14. AHM

    AHM NES Member

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    Manning Manse in North Bricka used to have a Chinese restaurant.
    (Now it's got Jon Ryan's Pub).
    It was built ca. 1696 - does that count?

    It's where we first had pom-pom chicken
    (cold shredded chicken salad with sesame sauce).
    But the Chinese restaurant menu included a classic turkey dinner.
    The owner said that customers used to the previous (Western) restaurant
    kept asking for it, so they had to add it; LOL.
     
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  15. Spanz

    Spanz NES Member

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    I hate eating there, everything is cooked the Wong Way.
     
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  16. MisterHappy

    MisterHappy NES Member

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    [​IMG]
     
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  17. MisterHappy

    MisterHappy NES Member

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    I thought the place had burned down....I guess it only mostly burned down.

    +1 for "Bricka" [laugh]
     
  18. AHM

    AHM NES Member

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    Yeah one history mentioned that it burned down,
    but apparently it got better.

    It's the only way to be sure, heh.
     
  19. new guy

    new guy NES Member

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    Seemed relevant. As found on the internet...

    [​IMG]
     
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  20. namedpipes

    namedpipes NES Member

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    Well it might not be to code but chances are it wasn't uncovered due to a fire or there would be scorching in the pic. Therefore it was empirically safe.
     
  21. albythewhitey

    albythewhitey

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    Im saying if you had 4 rows of lights and wanted a switch for each row you could use a duplex switch and have 4 switches in a two gang box
     
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  22. Waher

    Waher NES Member

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  23. AHM

    AHM NES Member

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    At first I thought it was nails.
    Then I thought it was seriously thick wire.
    But I looked even closer and saw that it was insulated wire.

    I've seen worse.

    Note well:
    It sucks to have your house burn down
    (especially if you're inside it)
    because of a clown shoe wiring job.

    But it's no bowl of cherries to be towing a trailer,
    stand on the brakes, and have the whole thing jackknife
    because one of the wires fell out of the hole in the socket back by the hitch.

    We should have been so lucky as for the dweeb to do this good a job.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    It looks like nowadays if you're lucky the stripped end of the wire
    goes into a collet where it's secured with a set screw.
    But back in the day, there were stamped flanges with screws
    that would ideally hold down a spade lug,
    but at least get a wire twisted the right way.
     
  24. Talon3

    Talon3 NES Member

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    Back in the early 90s I was in an electronics shop class. Old CRT tvs and monitors rule of thumb was 1000v per diagonal screen inch. The tube has a big round rubber seal over the thick feeder wire. First rule was to not touch that until it sat for a while or was discharged safely first.
     
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