Thinking of a career change after losing dream job

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I was given a job offer 2 weeks ago doing exactly what I wanted for the money I wanted on night shift closer to home. I found out this week the guy who hired me in was fired because he was paying me too much and the new offer was going to be for less money than I make now on day shift, so I got screwed out of my dream job.

I'm not seeing much available for machinist work on night shifts that will allow me to further my skills as a setup guy or programmer, it's all just production for low pay and I can't get hired on day shifts because guys with 20 years more experience than me keep getting them.

I see myself 20 years from now doing the same work and even when I get offers from other companies now they take them away days before I'm supposed to start, so I'm facing facts that this machinist thing isn't working.
did you lawyer up; i won 2 cases for back pay when an agency tried to screw me. the state div of employment sided with me. these places just figure you will get mad go away and move on without any recourse. took a nice vacation with the $$$ and sent them a few "wish you were here photos.
I looked at some jobs that don't require years of schooling to do and pay okay. I'm not into medical jobs, just doesn't interest me. One that caught my eye was sales representative. I've never tried being a salesman before, Idk how to get people to buy something they don't want, but if it pays well I'll figure something out. A couple ounces of the Chronic will help seal any deal, right?

Is anybody here a sales rep? What's the job like? Is it worth considering?

Private investigators seem to get paid well. Is this field likely to stay in demand in the future?

Plumbers sound like they get paid well and fixed leaks and clogs can't be that tough, can it?
 
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Join the military. Get a(nother) skill/trade, get out and get paid to get a 4 year degree.
This is what I was going to suggest. When I enlisted, “getting out and going to college” was a joke. Nobody did that. Nowadays more of my E-2/E-3’s have college degrees than not. And most of them are using Tuition Assistance to leave a four year enlistment with at LEAST a free Bachelors degree, and still having 36 months of paid tuition AND E-5 WITH dependent BAH, to get paid for their own or their dependent’s college! After 4 years of shit base pay but unheard of benefits for an 18-twenty whatever that MORE than make up for the base pay, they are literally getting paid - and paid well - to go to college to get a Master’s, or finish up their Bachelor’s, or transfer it to their kids. That part got tightened up lately, I ignored the message because I’m grandfathered, but I think it’s still a thing.

Probably a 4 year hiatus from the machining trade, but you’d be hard pressed to find the benefits that Uncle Sam is offering nowadays, and 4 years goes by fast. Hell, I barely blinked and I’m on the brink of 20...
 
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One line of work that is overlooked and in great demand these days is HVAC, it is much easier to get into than plumbing.
I'd start off getting an oil burner license, reading a book and $75. Fee. then get a job at a good HVAC company and work your way thru the other licenses, good oil burner techs are few and far, and most plumbing companies need guys solely for oil burners.
My oldest kid did HVAC in high school - he had potential employers wanting to pay him more than I make, before he was even old enough to buy beer!
 

Asaltweapon

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The thing about HVAC is that there are so many avenues with it. Home install and repairs all the way to facility management.
A good friend was always doing something challenging at a local hospital every week. Sounded like fun actually. He’s never been unemployed a single day in his 60 years. He’s now in a huge multi tenant facility with just 2 other guys. Always in a new truck. Nice home, nice beachside condo, always out with his wife having a blast.
 
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You're young enough to enter an apprenticeship program for the trades if you are sincerely thinking of changing your employment direction (and old enough to take the training seriously). Just remember that if you do commit to a licensed trade that you're in it for the long game. I've seen kids leave electrical apprenticeship programs in the middle of it because they were lured away by the short-term prospect of more money. Had they stayed with the trade, eventually they would have passed the wage level they were working for and it would have only increased from there. In the trades you, yourself have the ability to control how valuable you are by the skillsets and specific knowledge you commit yourself to learning. In short, the more you learn, the more you know and the more valuable you are, whether it's for your own company or as an employee.

As far as plumbers go, it reminds of this one:
A Doctor called a plumber to his home to fix his toilet. When he finished the work he gave him his bill.
"What is this!" exclaimed the good doctor, "I'm a doctor and I don't make this much money!"
The plumber replied: "Neither did I when I was a Doctor".

Regardless of what direction you choose to go (or if you decide to continue in your current machinists trade), now is a great time to be looking for work. As recently as yesterday, I had the owner of a tree surgery company tell me that he can't find good help. He's even willing to train them if they commit to the profession. This lack of committed, qualified help is a constant problem that I hear from business owners that I know and some have said that they can't grow their businesses any bigger because of it.
 
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As far as plumbers go, it reminds of this one:
A Doctor called a plumber to his home to fix his toilet. When he finished the work he gave him his bill.
"What is this!" exclaimed the good doctor, "I'm a doctor and I don't make this much money!"
The plumber replied: "Neither did I when I was a Doctor".
My dentist is a licensed Journeyman and Master Plumber in MA.
 

42!

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op, did you not get an offer letter from the company? i believe if one was signed it has to be honored.
Doesn't matter, employee at will, they can let you to any time without a reason.
Might have something if he quit a job to take the new one, lost wages = damages, would have to sue. But that has risks, it's a small world and prospective employers aren't keen on people who sue their employers. If you want to go this route, talk to a lawyer.

OP, you'll see better opportunity for advancement and movement to other positions within a company on the day shift, that's when the bosses are there. Night shift is quieter, less people to deal with, you won't see that in sales. That's nothing but people and talking.

You may want to consider working where you are while you build to start your own shop. There is some sales in that. And having others work for you is where the big money is. But don't tread on your employers tirf, being known as a guy who engages in a conflict of interest isn't going to help you.
 

Picton

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As recently as yesterday, I had the owner of a tree surgery company tell me that he can't find good help. He's even willing to train them if they commit to the profession. This lack of committed, qualified help is a constant problem that I hear from business owners that I know and some have said that they can't grow their businesses any bigger because of it.
It’s not just the trades. I’m a teacher, and it’s that bad among younger teachers as well. Most just don’t stay with it longer than a few years, from what I’ve seen.
 

garandman

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I disagree. The manufacturing sector is the one sector that is shrinking. That doesn't bode well for the long term. OP even indirectly acknowledges this in his post. His very experience is a direct result of that sector's struggles and the resulting downward pressure it's putting on wages as those that remain do what they can to remain competitive
Wrong in every way.

Manufacturing employment in the US has been increasing since the end of the 2009 recession.

Job gains for the manufacturing industry in the last 12 months are the most since 1995

Manufacturing revenue exceeded the previous peak in 2009 last year as well.

Manufacturing workers make more than the services sector.

2019 Massachusetts Manufacturing Facts | NAM

Every New England state has high tech manufacturing initiatives, and they all have severe shortages in high tech manufacturing workers.
 

garandman

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JoeT

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Manufacturing wages are about 10% higher than other sectors.

Example: Machine Operator: $16.80 / hour.

https://www.glassdoor.com/Salaries/boston-manufacturing-technician-salary-SRCH_IL.0,6_IM109_KO7,31.htm

We saw new ASMET’s (Associates in Mechanical Engineering Technology) routinely being offered $45,000-$50,000 with zero experience, for CAD or Manufacturing jobs.

There's a Chick-fil-a opening near me, the sign out from says not hiring $16.40. Paying someone to be polite at a cash register or cook waffle fries, shouldn't pay roughly the same as a machinist.

I just hired a young 20 something at $25 an hour for an entry level job, and felt bad about how little I offered him.

If you're looking for good , quality people, you can't pay them fast food wages

On a side note, the hardest part of hiring 20 somethings now is finding one that will pass a drug test
 

Asaltweapon

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My brother is a Director Of Manufacturing at a medical device manufacturer in the Northeast. I guess I got a few questions for him on the status on the quality of today’s work force and wages. I normally get the comics from the idiot decisions made by others below him that leave me scratching my own head.
 

Broccoli Iglesias

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OP, since you have several years of experience already, have you considered teaching?

Maybe part time to supplement your income until something better comes around?

I'm sure your experience is more than enough to teach people that dont know anything.
 

Buck F

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Do they have real shortages, or just shortages at the wages they are offering?
I can’t speak for the machining industry but I have lots of contractor clients (landscapers, irrigation installers, painters etc.) who can’t find reliable entry level help for $20/hr. in SouthEastern MA
 

Spanz

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i am surprised nobody mentioned learning welding. A good TIG welder can write his own ticket, and it is clean work too...unlike the old stick welders. And you can take a night time course in it to see if you are good at it, too. Lawrence Technical School was doing nighttime welding courses last i looked.
 
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OP, since you have several years of experience already, have you considered teaching?

Maybe part time to supplement your income until something better comes around?

I'm sure your experience is more than enough to teach people that dont know anything.
I'd be a lot better of a teacher when it comes to CNC curricula. When I was at CCRI 10+ yrs ago their CNC lab was a f***ing joke. They had a tiny lathe, a tiny mill and most of the classes were based around manual machines like it's still the 70s. IDK if they ever improved things, but there is a definite lack of CNC knowledge for machining teachers in RI.

But even in teaching it's the same song and dance of guys with more experience getting hired over me. They're not gonna hire some kid who's not even 30 to teach anybody vs a guy in his 50s or 60s who has missing teeth and can barely spell or talk in front of a group.

I have thought about teaching tho, but problem is that I'm not a CNC lathe guy, just CNC milling.
 
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Do they have real shortages, or just shortages at the wages they are offering?
If you've got 25+ yrs experience, you're set to get at least $25/hr in Mass. RI... IDK, maybe $21. The wages are very bad in RI unless you're working for General Dynamics or Tiffany.

Health insurance is also worse in RI than Mass.

Manufacturing wages are about 10% higher than other sectors.

Example: Machine Operator: $16.80 / hour.

https://www.glassdoor.com/Salaries/boston-manufacturing-technician-salary-SRCH_IL.0,6_IM109_KO7,31.htm

We saw new ASMET’s (Associates in Mechanical Engineering Technology) routinely being offered $45,000-$50,000 with zero experience, for CAD or Manufacturing jobs.
$45k in Boston is practically minimum wage there.

As for the 10% higher figure that's dependant on what other careers we're talking about. Services sector jobs can either be $8/hr or $80/hr and those lower wages drive down the average. Retail we all know is shit.
 
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I can’t speak for the machining industry but I have lots of contractor clients (landscapers, irrigation installers, painters etc.) who can’t find reliable entry level help for $20/hr. in SouthEastern MA
My point is there is no shortage of landscapers. There is a shortage of landscapers willing to work for $20/hour.

Retail shortage when paying just above minimum - sure. But, probably not at Jordans Furniture when salespeople average over $80K for working retail. My guess is there is absolutely no shortage of people willing to take those jobs.
you've got 25+ yrs experience, you're set to get at least $25/hr in Mass. RI... IDK, maybe $21.
You speak as if that was real money :).

On a side note, the hardest part of hiring 20 somethings now is finding one that will pass a drug test
Alternatively put, the hardest part about hiring 20somethings is imposing a drug test requirement for smoking the heathen devil weed in their off hours that has absolutely nothing to do with their job performance.
 
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There's good money in software development. It's just like welding though, to be good at it you have to be GOOD at it.

Also Managed Service Providers are always looking for people to take $60k to do the jobs of 10 people and burn out in a year. That's always fun.
 
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There's good money in software development. It's just like welding though, to be good at it you have to be GOOD at it.
It's a tough field to age in though. Hit 50 or 60 and the market sort of dries up if you are doing actual software development and have not become a REMF with 'executive' or 'VP' in your previous job tite. And no, VP or director slots in tiny companies do not credential you as executive material.

I managed to get hired doing actual software development at 60, but that was only because I have very specific experience relative to one job out of the hundreds I looked at online. It could have just as easily come down as "guess I'll stay retired".
 
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I can’t speak for the machining industry but I have lots of contractor clients (landscapers, irrigation installers, painters etc.) who can’t find reliable entry level help for $20/hr. in SouthEastern MA
My point is there is no shortage of landscapers. There is a shortage of landscapers willing to work for $20/hour.
That can be said about any industry saying they're "starving" to hire people. Yeah, if you're an employer and your starting wage for any job in manufacturing is $12/hr, where do you expect to find qualified people to work for that wage?

you've got 25+ yrs experience, you're set to get at least $25/hr in Mass. RI... IDK, maybe $21.
You speak as if that was real money :).
Yeah... it's amazing how little skilled manufacturing workers get paid today. I can't wait to see the days where simple parts can be 3D printed and the machining trade shrinks by half as a result. Then machinists will go from making $18/hr to $10/hr manning a warehouse full of 3D printers.


Alternatively put, the hardest part about hiring 20somethings is imposing a drug test requirement for smoking the heathen devil weed in their off hours that has absolutely nothing to do with their job performance.
The shop I work now there are no drug tests, owners don't want to pay for them as most would likely fail. 20 somethings getting hired don't last long and the issue isn't drugs, it's them showing up every day or just doing their job.
 

Asaltweapon

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I’m figuring out that OP already has all the knowledge, answers and basis to earn well into 6 figures.
His reply’s to his own post speak volumes.
His unwillingness to relocate for whatever reason again says it all.
Nightshit layabouts is a real deal.
 

jct61765

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I'd be a lot better of a teacher when it comes to CNC curricula. When I was at CCRI 10+ yrs ago their CNC lab was a f***ing joke. They had a tiny lathe, a tiny mill and most of the classes were based around manual machines like it's still the 70s. IDK if they ever improved things, but there is a definite lack of CNC knowledge for machining teachers in RI.

But even in teaching it's the same song and dance of guys with more experience getting hired over me. They're not gonna hire some kid who's not even 30 to teach anybody vs a guy in his 50s or 60s who has missing teeth and can barely spell or talk in front of a group.

I have thought about teaching tho, but problem is that I'm not a CNC lathe guy, just CNC milling.
Manual machining teaches feeds and speeds for tooling.
 

Buck F

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My point is there is no shortage of landscapers. There is a shortage of landscapers willing to work for $20/hour.
If we go by that standard then there can never be a labor shortage, only a wage shortage. And I wasn’t talking about landscapers at $20/hr, I was talking about the guys they hire during the summer to cut grass. There’s a point beyond where they can charge enough to cover their labor costs. I’m not sure offering $25, $30, $50 an hour is going to get them someone who’s going to be that motivated & that hard working that’ll make it worth their while.
 

banditone

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i am surprised nobody mentioned learning welding. A good TIG welder can write his own ticket, and it is clean work too...unlike the old stick welders. And you can take a night time course in it to see if you are good at it, too. Lawrence Technical School was doing nighttime welding courses last i looked.
Don’t welders end up with lung cancer or is that a myth?
 

Spanz

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Don’t welders end up with lung cancer or is that a myth?
TIG welding is a fluxless welding. So no, there is nothing toxic in the air, unless you are welding some sort of exotic metal. And there is ventilation nowadays, that they did not use in the past
 
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