Thinking of a career change after losing dream job

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I was given a job offer 2 weeks ago doing exactly what I wanted for the money I wanted on night shift closer to home. I found out this week the guy who hired me in was fired because he was paying me too much and the new offer was going to be for less money than I make now on day shift, so I got screwed out of my dream job.

I'm not seeing much available for machinist work on night shifts that will allow me to further my skills as a setup guy or programmer, it's all just production for low pay and I can't get hired on day shifts because guys with 20 years more experience than me keep getting them.

I see myself 20 years from now doing the same work and even when I get offers from other companies now they take them away days before I'm supposed to start, so I'm facing facts that this machinist thing isn't working.

I looked at some jobs that don't require years of schooling to do and pay okay. I'm not into medical jobs, just doesn't interest me. One that caught my eye was sales representative. I've never tried being a salesman before, Idk how to get people to buy something they don't want, but if it pays well I'll figure something out. A couple ounces of the Chronic will help seal any deal, right?

Is anybody here a sales rep? What's the job like? Is it worth considering?

Private investigators seem to get paid well. Is this field likely to stay in demand in the future?

Plumbers sound like they get paid well and fixed leaks and clogs can't be that tough, can it?
 

Uzi2

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There's machinist jobs in Kentucky if you are amenable to moving.
 

radioman

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Plumbing might not require years of schooling but it sure does require a years long apprenticeship in order to become eligible for your Journeymans license. A Journeymans license allows you to work by yourself if you want to start a company where you can hire others on in your employee you will need a masters license which requires even more time in. So if you’re looking for a quick get I don’t think plumbing is where you should be looking.
 

Hustler One

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Are you physically fit enough to pass a basic agility test? Border patrol, Customs and BP, Nuclear materials couriers and static plant security, DOE security et cetera are all hiring like mad men. Matter of fact, I don't know how anybody doesn't have a job in this climate.
 

drgrant

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5 years as an apprentice plus school. Another years to get your masters. Not easy but you can pick a job you want right now, bodies are needed.
-It's always been a pain in the ass finding a decent plumber in MA that will actually show up. This has been true as long as I can
remember.

-I know very few "poor" plumbers, even the ones not running other guys ALWAYS have work. The ones running a few guys have mansions
and buy guns several at a time...

-Mike
 

bigben111435

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Plumbers sound like they get paid well and fixed leaks and clogs can't be that tough, can it?
I dunno where you are located, but if you are talking massachusetts plumber, there are 5 tier of schooling required to become a journeyman, and you cannot complete more than 1tier a calendar year. They may let you combine tier 1 and 2.
Of course you first have to be hired by a licensed massachusetts master plumber, only a master plumber can grant a new apprentice plumber license. Without a apprentice license uou are not allowed to work on ANY plumbing or gas.
And you cannot attend classes without apprentice license.
And if you show up thinking it will be easy, you won't last long.
Plumbing has been a protected trade in MA for a long time, it is the only permit in MA a homeowner cannot apply for.
So, yes, it can be lucrative, but that is because just like drgrant's post says.. he knows very few poor plumbers...
We weed them out.
 

slap shot

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Are you physically fit enough to pass a basic agility test? Border patrol, Customs and BP, Nuclear materials couriers and static plant security, DOE security et cetera are all hiring like mad men. Matter of fact, I don't know how anybody doesn't have a job in this climate.
How does one become a nuclear materials courier? This sounds pretty awesome.
 
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on those days you slosh around in raw sewage or have your face a foot away from the toilet drain while messing with the flange and seal, you'll understand why they get paid well.
Lol believe me I thought about being a plumber for a bit then at a job site I was on I saw a dude in that spot with the bathroom we'd all been using.... Istayed in low voltage work
 

10thSFFD

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Great time to be looking!

Stay away from sales. Sales is all about contacts and to build those will require a lot of time with almost zero income. All sales are commission driven.

Upgrade your talent! Look at fields which you did not consider before. You are a machinist. Become a service technician! Most companies will train you on their own equipment once you will convince them that you are a hard worker and you know how to work with clients.

What you want to land is a job which will lead into many other possibilities created by internal training.
Try this, for example: Careers - Landa Nanography
 

FrankNA

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I've never tried being a salesman before, Idk how to get people to buy something they don't want, but if it pays well I'll figure something out.
I've been a capital equipment salesman for over 20 years and it's not about trying to sell someone something they don't want or need. I represent about 15 different product lines and fit the customer's application requirements with the equipment that meets their needs. You have to be honest and walk away if you're unable to provide a solution to their problem. Sometimes its better to refer the customer to a company that is better capable of handling the customer's needs. Most will appreciate and remember your honesty and the fact that you were able to point them in the right direction. You have to look at yourself as a problem solver not someone trying to sell ice cubes to an Eskimo.

The money part can be very rewarding but it can also be a roller coaster ride. Some years you're rolling high and making a bag load of dough, other years you might be scrapping by and just making the mortgage payment. You have to sock away $$$ during the fat times so you won't get hurt so bad during the lean times. It all averages out to be very good living in the long run. The freedom that comes with being your own boss, making your own hours and not having some prick looking over your shoulder micro managing every move you make can not be overstated.

Good Luck!
 

Broccoli Iglesias

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I was given a job offer 2 weeks ago doing exactly what I wanted for the money I wanted on night shift closer to home. I found out this week the guy who hired me in was fired because he was paying me too much and the new offer was going to be for less money than I make now on day shift, so I got screwed out of my dream job.

I'm not seeing much available for machinist work on night shifts that will allow me to further my skills as a setup guy or programmer, it's all just production for low pay and I can't get hired on day shifts because guys with 20 years more experience than me keep getting them.

I see myself 20 years from now doing the same work and even when I get offers from other companies now they take them away days before I'm supposed to start, so I'm facing facts that this machinist thing isn't working.

I looked at some jobs that don't require years of schooling to do and pay okay. I'm not into medical jobs, just doesn't interest me. One that caught my eye was sales representative. I've never tried being a salesman before, Idk how to get people to buy something they don't want, but if it pays well I'll figure something out. A couple ounces of the Chronic will help seal any deal, right?

Is anybody here a sales rep? What's the job like? Is it worth considering?

Private investigators seem to get paid well. Is this field likely to stay in demand in the future?

Plumbers sound like they get paid well and fixed leaks and clogs can't be that tough, can it?
If you do sales, go for software sales, cyber security. That stuff is selling like water on a hot day.

No schooling needed for any sales job. I know great sales guys that used to be plumbers.

You will most likely need to start in a start up as an Account Executive (AE) or business development rep BDR.

BDR kinda s*cks because those are the dudes making cold calls all day for the AE. Eventually they get promoted to AE. Skip this step if you can.

In a start up, a lot of times they will demand a lot out of you and might have unreasonable goals. You will need to put up with that junk for a year or two and then getting another job will be very easy with that experience.

Some companies, like IBM, they still want people to have college degrees, but the beauty of sales jobs, specially in cyber sec, is that it is FULL of smaller companies thar care about experience mostly.

On your first year, you can easily make $150K+.

You sell value. You dont push product. Sales people tha push product and dont listen to the customer dont last very long.

When you sell value, you listen to the customer and try to solve their issues.

Find a company that sells on value, and a company thet sells through resellers. If you are good to your resellers, they will feed you no matter what company you go to. You will chill in the office and they will bring you customers.

Are you that type of guy?

You could also do sales in your field. People love sales people that actually know the product. But I dont know your world so I cant comment.
 
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Broccoli Iglesias

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I've been a capital equipment salesman for over 20 years and it's not about trying to sell someone something they don't want or need. I represent about 15 different product lines and fit the customer's application requirements with the equipment that meets their needs. You have to be honest and walk away if you're unable to provide a solution to their problem. Sometimes its better to refer the customer to a company that is better capable of handling the customer's needs. Most will appreciate and remember your honesty and the fact that you were able to point them in the right direction. You have to look at yourself as a problem solver not someone trying to sell ice cubes to an Eskimo.
Great advice.

I have done exactly that a few times, and customers love it. I have also given discounts equal to what another product costs, so the customer can buy my product and the other product for the same cost before discounts. I have done that because my product could cover 9 out of 10 needs, but they needed something else for need #10.
 

timbo

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The company I work for in NH is always looking for good CNC machinists. We run day and night shifts. There is some production work but a lot of it is one off custom stuff. It's in the Lake Sunapee region (it's not Ruger). If you're interested, shoot me a PM and I'll send you more info.
 

NHCraigT

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.... Plumbers sound like they get paid well and fixed leaks and clogs can't be that tough, can it?
Typical non-plumber (usually a home owner) type of thinking .....

(I'm not a plumber. I am a GC and have seen the kind of literal crap these guys have to deal with, including getting caked in dirt & cobwebs while wiggling into dank/gross crawl spaces and areas that the average person would never attempt to venture into, let alone = spending hours & hours working in those locations).


on those days you slosh around in raw sewage or have your face a foot away from the toilet drain while messing with the flange and seal, you'll understand why they get paid well.
^ This ^
 
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Mother Deuce

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Heavy Eqp and construction is lacking talent. A Hydro Lic is easy to get and you might in this climate just walk into a operators seat. Years past you had to work your way up into a seat, but the lack of people doing this now you might just get a seat fresh out the box.
Unless your family and or someone is willing to take the liability chance... that probably won't happen. One could probably start as a labor and work in to that eventually. The union has a apprentice program.
 

Tinkermatic

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I'm in the midst of a career change. I spent 16 years in the food industry after having gone to culinary school. I looked at plumbing(neighbor is a master plumber with his own business) but have done enough physical labor that it just didn't interest me. The pay is great, but it's hard work and a long apprenticeship program. I sat down and thought about what I really wanted. Eventually decided I wanted some of the perks that come with working for a larger company. I've only ever worked for small business(very small) so things like vacatons, 401K, promotions, being able to take a day off, are all foreign to me. Hell, my wife has a full gym with free classes in the basement of her office that costs her $25 to use every month and she gets reimbursed $200 a year for using it! Nevermind the six, yes 6, weeks of paid vacation, yearly bonus, and well matched 401K. Bitch...

I'm back in school and working 2 jobs. A business degree with a touch of tech seems like a good starting point. I stil don't know exactly what I want to do though. It's terrifying and absolutely worth it. Having a goal to work towards as well as new constant experiences has made me a more rounded person.
I say go for it.
Sales can be tough and you have to be ok with rejection, especially if you're cold calling people or showing up unannounced. But it's a hell of an experience. Leaving the food industry was the toughest and smartest decision I've made in my short 35 years. Figure out a short term plan and take the leap, then just keep working towards where you want to be.

Good luck!
 

Mother Deuce

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Can you expand on the liability issue.
If you back over someone, if you putt a coworker into the ditch with a bucket, Run into the side of a dump truck with a loader, Back out of your traffic control zone and place a backhoe boom into someones windshield going by at 40, out of ignorance or inexperience or trying to be overly efficient bury yourself in your machine in several thousand tons of material. hoisting something with no known weight ( that you always need to know the weight of) and getting over the side ( and off the chart) and tipping the machine over...Just to name a few. It is not nuclear science however, very few are going to give a key to someone with no experience out of the gate. Some people "get it" right away and some never do.
 
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Private investigators seem to get paid well. Is this field likely to stay in demand in the future?

Plumbers sound like they get paid well and fixed leaks and clogs can't be that tough, can it?
PI jobs are cartelled in this state. You can't get a PI job without several years of investigative experience and that is pretty much limited to former LEOs. A reserve officer in Ashland tried to pass of his police work as ''investigative", was strongly opposed by the chief, and failed to get his PI card. This was at least a decade ago.

I'll leave it to the BTDT crowd to comment on how tough being a plumber is, but the barriers to entry are significant and you need to work under a licensed plumber for a substantial period of time (years). There is a LOT to know to get a license that you will hardly ever use (how many pounds of lead would you use in a 6' hub joint? - and I probably botched that question). The reason plumbing rates are high is not just the skill, but the barriers to entry those that control the profession have succeeded in erecting.

Sales can be lucrative and does not require years of training. The trick is getting hired. Indeed.com claims the average full time sales person at Jordan's furniture makes north of $80k a year, but the other workers (furniture setup, warehouse, etc) generally make under $20. With that kind of pay to credential ratio, there are MANY people vying for each job and they are not easy to get.

This is why so many retreads go into real estate sales. Top producers do very well; the jobs are easy to get since the office you work out of makes almost no financial investment in you but takes a cut of anything to make. Pharma sales can be very lucrative but unless you are under 30, female, and feel comfortable wearing 5" heels as you visit MDs all day, you won't get it. (well maybe it's not that bad, but you get the idea).

The ease of getting a license means many non or marginal producers try to make it, and many fail or earn only bit of incremental money for their household. I call it the 'bored housewife effect" - once the kids leave the nest, the bored housewife gets RE license and finds out how hard the job really is.
 
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