The comprehensive, omnibus Mountain Bike Thread

SpaceCritter

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The Dawg is back!

[party]

20190919_070826.jpg

It had been parked in the garage pending a trip to the bike vet for its annual and some brake work. And yes, h8rs, it's the same vintage as the Stinky. [grin]

Speaking of, having spent the past several months riding that big orange beast all-mountain, the Dawg is so light it almost feels like a toy. [laugh]
 

Broccoli Iglesias

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These past two weekends I prioritized shooting over biking before it gets too cold.

But, I want to buy some studded tires, maybe 2.6 wide, so I can go ride some fun for roads during winter.

What do you guys recommend?

Trails are also fine, but over here they have too many rocks, I dont want to find a nasty surprise under the snow when I fall. Lol.

Maybe I wont even go with studded tires. I need to read a little more about that.
 

atmay

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Do any of you guys know a good online source for 26” tires that AREN’T fat bike tires?

I’m looking for some gravel-type tires for the GF’s mountain bike, but my usual source (backcountry/competitive cyclist) has nothing of the sort I’m looking for.
 

Supermoto

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mtnbiker26

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These past two weekends I prioritized shooting over biking before it gets too cold.

But, I want to buy some studded tires, maybe 2.6 wide, so I can go ride some fun for roads during winter.

What do you guys recommend?

Trails are also fine, but over here they have too many rocks, I dont want to find a nasty surprise under the snow when I fall. Lol.

Maybe I wont even go with studded tires. I need to read a little more about that.
Studs work great when the conditions are right such as really hardpack snow or the porous half-icy stuff after a few freeze/thaw cycles or maybe some rain and a re-freeze. They screech and scratch through icy corners and it's pretty fun. They grip the hell out of exposed dirt sections and the rolling resistance is pretty awful so they're not great when the trails are half dirt and half snow. Best way to go is a second bike or second wheelset. Some guys run flat pedals and boots to stay warm and dry. Check out Bar Mitts too. They really help keep your hands warm but could also be hazardous in a crash. Avoid places where people have walked in the snow and "postholed" it. For snow deeper than a few inches you'll need a fatbike with 5" tires.
 

Broccoli Iglesias

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Studs work great when the conditions are right such as really hardpack snow or the porous half-icy stuff after a few freeze/thaw cycles or maybe some rain and a re-freeze. They screech and scratch through icy corners and it's pretty fun. They grip the hell out of exposed dirt sections and the rolling resistance is pretty awful so they're not great when the trails are half dirt and half snow. Best way to go is a second bike or second wheelset. Some guys run flat pedals and boots to stay warm and dry. Check out Bar Mitts too. They really help keep your hands warm but could also be hazardous in a crash. Avoid places where people have walked in the snow and "postholed" it. For snow deeper than a few inches you'll need a fatbike with 5" tires.
Thank you.
 

SpaceCritter

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Studs work great when the conditions are right such as really hardpack snow or the porous half-icy stuff after a few freeze/thaw cycles or maybe some rain and a re-freeze. They screech and scratch through icy corners and it's pretty fun. They grip the hell out of exposed dirt sections and the rolling resistance is pretty awful so they're not great when the trails are half dirt and half snow. Best way to go is a second bike or second wheelset. Some guys run flat pedals and boots to stay warm and dry. Check out Bar Mitts too. They really help keep your hands warm but could also be hazardous in a crash. Avoid places where people have walked in the snow and "postholed" it. For snow deeper than a few inches you'll need a fatbike with 5" tires.
Another option would be to ride where the trails have been groomed, either by happenstance or as a matter of practice. One caveat: in places where motorized is allowed, if the "happenstance" = snowmobiles there's a potential for user conflict. That's not so much a problem here in Connecticut (then again, I haven't seen machines in Naugy in years even though they're allowed), but in other places there's a perception that we're not only a trail hazard (smaller and slower than the sleds), but "freeloaders" since we typically don't pay anything and they do.

If there's a place regularly hit by snowshoers, that's great. I've been known to snowshoe trails I'd want to ride later, though it usually wants a couple people / couple passes.

I know people who swear by the bar mitts. My problem: even in the winter, I'll often have to stop to do trail maintenance. To date, I've been using Cabela's duck hunting gloves. On really cold mornings, my hands might be cold for the first five minutes or so.

I don't clip in as a rule, but on really cold mornings footwear of choice is: https://www.mukluks.com/CamuksXtreme/productinfo/CAMXM/#.XaLyTFVKhaQ
("Really cold" <= 10F)

I also wear my armor. I've hit icy patches and gone down on a knee, and have been thankful it was there.
 

Supermoto

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I would add that if you are riding in the snow on groomed trails, if you are making ruts in the snow. Then don't ride. Only thing worse than a groomed trail ruined by skinny tires is the post holes they leave next to the ruts pushing out their bike.
 

SpaceCritter

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Speaking of washing...

Friday I came out of the gym and got in my truck. First thing I was hit with was the smell of my riding gear in the back seat. Next it was something that smelled like a cross between a billy goat and old coon hound, with a healthy dose of rotten cabbage. Yep - me. Hmm, so that's why everyone left the gym when I got there. [crying] (Gym stuff gets washed with riding stuff.)

So I'm going to try a different laundry strategy - an ounce of this stuff in the fabric softener dispenser with every load:

I'll post how goes. Not sure what to do about the Pack-O-Wonder, though - my understanding is you're not supposed to wash them, and it's by far the stinkiest piece of gear I own. I have a call into 5.11 to find out.

Meanwhile, scenes from this morning's ride:
20191020_070123.jpg

20191020_070047.jpg

Edit: Revivex is the same stuff that used to be called MiraZyme.
 
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mtnbiker26

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I also sea kayak and the gear can get quite stanky. I think it's the micro-organisms or whatever is in the water. Wet gear left in a warm car or Thule box all day will almost make you barf. We use the McNett Mirazyme. Use a cap full in a few gallons of water in a large bucket or tote to rinse everything.
 

SpaceCritter

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I also sea kayak and the gear can get quite stanky. I think it's the micro-organisms or whatever is in the water. Wet gear left in a warm car or Thule box all day will almost make you barf. We use the McNett Mirazyme. Use a cap full in a few gallons of water in a large bucket or tote to rinse everything.
We'll see how it goes. I mean, I've made all kinds of (sort of) jokes before about keeping the bears away, and Billy-Goat-n-Coonhound I can live with, but I draw the line at rotten cabbage. [laugh]
 

TrackDayRdr

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Anyone using a Wahoo Elemnt Bolt? I love the thing except it is terrible at the one thing I need it to be good at - keeping track of distance. I rode a Blackstone Valley festival on Sunday where the mapped route was 11 miles, other riders' Strava was 11.25 or so, but mine? 9.77.

I dropped my kid off at school this morning and compared my odometer to my Bolt, and did the same during my drive to work and both were spot on. Looking around online this seems to be a common issue but nobody has any fixes except "have you updated the firmware?" Maybe it's something to do with the tree cover and zig zag singletrack? Other Fly By riders (most using Strava app on their phone) had very similar mileages to each other with me being the odd man out.

Suggestions?
 

Supermoto

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Have you tried adding the speed sensor? That made a big different in my mileage when I added one to my garmin, especially on tight twisty trails

Also check what the sample rate for the GPS is. Change it to 1 sec if it is auto or smart
 

mtnbiker26

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Have you tried adding the speed sensor? That made a big different in my mileage when I added one to my garmin, especially on tight twisty trails

Also check what the sample rate for the GPS is. Change it to 1 sec if it is auto or smart
This exactly. Speed sensor may or may not help but it does update faster than GPS so actual current speed and Strava segments are usually more accurate. Personally, I can get by without a speed sensor on my mountain bike because I don't really look at the computer while I'm riding but rather just look at Strava afterwards. I definitely need the speed sensor on the road bike because I actually look at speed and power in real time while riding. The sample time is more likely to have an impact especially on tight twisty stuff.
 
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Anyone using a Wahoo Elemnt Bolt? I love the thing except it is terrible at the one thing I need it to be good at - keeping track of distance. I rode a Blackstone Valley festival on Sunday where the mapped route was 11 miles, other riders' Strava was 11.25 or so, but mine? 9.77.

I dropped my kid off at school this morning and compared my odometer to my Bolt, and did the same during my drive to work and both were spot on. Looking around online this seems to be a common issue but nobody has any fixes except "have you updated the firmware?" Maybe it's something to do with the tree cover and zig zag singletrack? Other Fly By riders (most using Strava app on their phone) had very similar mileages to each other with me being the odd man out.

Suggestions?
I love my Bolt. Had it for 2 years and approximately 10,000 miles. Using it with a heart rate monitor and power meters on two different bikes (Quarq on one, Stages on the other). Every time I hear from Garmin owners I am thankful I chose Wahoo. Yeah, I imagine some tight zigzaggy single track would be hard to get an accurate distance on. It would really depend on the quality of the GPS signal in the area. I never tried to verify the distance from my cyclocross races, or CX practice sessions, but I have had no problems on the road.
 

new guy

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My Garmin watch was always ~10% shorter than Strava in the woods until I changed it to 1 sec. intervals and enabled GLONASS. Now they're both consistently pretty close.
 

atmay

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It’s important to give it time to settle down and get a good fix after startup, too.

I’ve jumped the gun and ended up with some whack-ass results before.


Also, I have a garmin and have had no issues that weren’t my fault (see above). When I was looking at head units, the wahoos and garmins seemed pretty well matched. I already had a garmin watch, so I went with that.

I would recommend outdoorgearlab.com and dcrainmaker.com for anyone looking for comparative reviews of this stuff.
 

TrackDayRdr

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Thanks for the input!! I **JUST** amazoned a Wahoo speed sensor which should be here tomorrow - just in time for the Wicked Ride (anybody going to that?) on Sunday. I'm hoping this fixes things, but I'm also wondering how everyone had such consistent readings using just the Strava app on their phones. Shouldn't a $250 dedicated bike computer have a better GPS than my phone? I bought this thing partly to free my phone from Strava duty and also assuming the Bolt would have more accurate readings.

I'll check the GPS settings now.
 

Supermoto

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Looks like the Elemnt Bolt is 1 sec only. Which is good.

The good thing about the speed sensor (at least on the Garmin) is that it will track mileage and speed even when there is no GPS signal. I use the auto size feature on mine so it automatically set the tire size based on GPS. I do a road ride for a little bit to get an accurate measurement and then it is accurate in the woods

Also, when you use a stand alone, there sometimes is a slight difference in mileage compared to using the strava app on a phone. Different logarithms etc
 
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