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The comprehensive, omnibus Mountain Bike Thread

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by carbuncle, Aug 16, 2014.

  1. Salyeica

    Salyeica NES Member

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    I took a brief look at the Process 153. How does the Stinky compare?
     

  2. Ipe

    Ipe NES Member

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    Haven't been a part of this thread but I ride a fair amount and have been for a while.

    In answer to this question, the Stinky is a freeride bike*. In short it's not really meant to be pedaled. Its more of a Huck it off huge jumps kind of bike. The Process series are trail and enduro bikes. The 153 leaning towards the enduro side of things (more downhill oriented but still very pedalable).

    With the cost of bikes nowadays you'd do well to test ride whatever you're interested in on the trails you actually ride. Good bike shops should have no issue with this. For example JRA Cycles in Medford has a great test fleet. I think you pay to ride, but the fee is applied to your eventual purchase.

    Another option is NEMBAFEST which is happening this coming weekend at KT. There will be lots of manufacturers there with lots of models to test ride.

    Good luck in your hunt.

    Oh, and for reference I ride an Ibis Mojo 3 set up 150f/130r. It's done it all, from tail riding around here, Highland, KT, and even the Pisgah region of N.C.

    * This is as I recall the Stinky. Kona may have changed things up some with a new version of the Stinky, and in that case I'm talking out my butt.... either way, the wish of good luck still stands!
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2019
  3. mu2bdriver

    mu2bdriver NES Member

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    I’ve been a passive participant in this thread for a while. Thank you for all the input and information. My last mtb experience was in a Trek 820 twenty years ago but after trail running and two decades later I’m looking to get back into it. It’s been accelerated by my son’s enjoyment on his bike and I’m getting sick of running to keep up with him. We stopped at Okemo and Killington this past week/weekend to check out the bike parks and I don’t know who was more excited. I’m in central CT and looking at cross country bikes. I’ve been guided towards YT, Trek, and Santa Cruz from a friend who’s been riding more recently and actively than me. Anyone/manufacturer I’m missing out on? So far I’m focusing on a full suspension 29er that can do trails, climbs, etc. that I will not outgrow in a year or two. I don’t see myself riding for times or trying to extract every inch of performance. High on my list is the new Trek Top Fuel 8.
    Thanks in advance.
     
  4. SpaceCritter

    SpaceCritter NES Member

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    That's a 2004 and yes, it is. And I'm crazy enough to ride it all-mountain from time to time. [grin] Yes, climbing sucks. [frown]
     
  5. Supermoto

    Supermoto NES Member

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    Top fuel 8 is a XC race bike. It would be a bike to hammer on and chase KOMs. So I would look at the Fuel Ex for a more all around trail bike, more comfortable position than the Top fuel, more suspension travel.

    YT Jeffsy is a good bike. If you want to do mail order. Canyon is other brand to look at.
     
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  6. Broccoli Iglesias

    Broccoli Iglesias NES Member

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    Trial an Intense sniper. There are two, Sniper XC (100mm/100mm) and sniper trail (120mm/120mm). They are great bike from what everyone tells me. I was only able to trial the XC because JRA didnt have a Trail. The XC feels great. Light and climbs great. The cheapest build comes in at 26lbs and it isn't all aluminum. The rest get a little lighter. I wouldn't recommend it for a bigger guy (I'm 5'10" - 175lbs). If you will be going down hill quite a bit and weight in the 190/200, the rear can feel a little soft. I read a few reviews on this and confirmed with the guys at the demo day. But I didnt feel anything.

    I still have a soft spot for Scott bikes as well. Here in the US, a lot of people tend to hate them, but I am not sure why. I think they read a couple of shitty reviews and just repeat that. The big downside is there arent a lot of dealers for support. That's the only reason I'm not getting another one.

    But their suspension lock is awesome. You can go from a hard tail to full suspension in a second without moving your hands. I used that function so much here in NE.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2019
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  7. Broccoli Iglesias

    Broccoli Iglesias NES Member

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    I agree. I already reserved the Instinct they have for next weekend. I didnt get to trial it as much as I wanted and want to take it over to Bear Brook if I can.

    Depending on how that goes I will place the order for the Primer 29 or Instinct 29.
     
  8. Supermoto

    Supermoto NES Member

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    Out of JRA demo bikes, I would also try a Pivot 429 trail. The DW link suspension has a pretty solid feel when you are on the pedals hard, but still remains plush over bumps. I felt it has too much anti-squat for my liking, you could feel the back end extending and pushing into the ground. If you like the Intense, you will probably like it too, gives almost a hardtail feel

    The good thing is there really isn't a bad suspension design anymore. They are all good, just different feels
     
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  9. Broccoli Iglesias

    Broccoli Iglesias NES Member

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    During demo day people kept talking about the 429, all good things. Everyone I spoke with kept asking if I already tried it.
     
  10. TrackDayRdr

    TrackDayRdr NES Member

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    VPP rear suspension, very similar to the Intense Primer. JRA sells a lot of Pivots.
     
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  11. mtnbiker26

    mtnbiker26 NES Member

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    Rocky stuff is built for BC so the shorter travel bikes work well in New England.

    Could be a new rep. The last guy was pretty good but he recently went back to his old position with Shimano.

    Just rode three easy days at KT with the GF and my Ti hardtail was more than enough for the terrain. Even on the uphills I was going fast enough to use the berms and pop off of stuff. Couldn’t imagine dragging a 32 pound bike around the entire time just to be able to go a bit faster on the downhills.
     
  12. Ipe

    Ipe NES Member

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    My son has a Jeffsey. Great bike but L O N G. Not the best for single track. He says my Mojo 3 is more flickable. A bunch of my friends have Pivots ranging from the 429 to a Switchblade, to a Firebird 29. Each is very, very happy with them. One had something on his 429 frame go bad, can't recall what. Pivot replaced the frame no questions asked despite it being out of the warranty period. You could do a lot worse than getting a Pivot.
     
  13. ReluctantDecoy

    ReluctantDecoy

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    Here's a question for you gear heads. I'm a light mountain biker. City bike path stuff mainly, but will venture off into the woods whenever possible (rarely these days). I bought a 2016 Specialized Pitch Comp 650B. It is an entry level front suspension only bike. Neglected it for an entire season, and for lack of a place to put it in my tiny city condo, it was left out on the balcony to the elements.

    Just looked at it last weekend. All exposed metal is now rust. This includes the front and rear discs, just about every cable, chain looks like it will rust off, seat post, etc. At about $700 original purchase price for the bike, is it worth me replacing parts to get this back up to running optimal, or should I Craigslist it as-is and look to buy another bike of the same quality? I figure some parts like the discs can be cleaned, but the entire cable system, chain, and a few other parts may require complete replacement. Additionally, this was the first bike I ever owned with caliper brakes, so I have no idea if the brakes are still usable now. I have a feeling even the tires might be toast, freezing and drying over a full year off.

    I have no idea what this level of bike's parts would cost, but I'm fairly handy in being able to install them myself. Any thoughts?
     
  14. atmay

    atmay NES Member

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    Chains are a consumable item.

    Cables are not *exactly* consumable, but pretty close.

    Brake rotors and pads are consumable - but just like cars, you can just brake the rust off if they aren’t pitted too bad.

    At least around here (Seacoast NH), basic service on a bike will run you $70-80, more in depth will cost you between 100 and 200. Parts extra. Most places I’ve seen will give the bike a once over when you bring it in, and suggest what’s needed.
     
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  15. SpaceCritter

    SpaceCritter NES Member

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    Hey, tomorrow morning I'm driving to Lyndon/Burke to start setting up a party for a couple-three thousand of our closest friends. [grin]

    Any of y'all coming?
     
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  16. ReluctantDecoy

    ReluctantDecoy

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    Thanks for the advise. So worst case scenario is $200 service plus parts if I I have someone handle it? This is kind of my predicament now of if I should throw money at this bike or consider selling and buying new. It would be a different case if this was a $2k+ full suspension rig, but I don't know if I can toss (potentially ) a few hundred at this bike if that gets me half way to a new one. I might try my hand at some de-rusting before making that call.
     
  17. atmay

    atmay NES Member

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    I would definitely give it a quick scrub. Then lube the drive train, and take it for an easy spin. See if the brakes and shifters work alright. It might not even be in that bad of shape.
     
  18. ReluctantDecoy

    ReluctantDecoy

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    Maybe it just looks bad (as does my year-off gut). I'll give it a good scrub next weekend to see what I can do with it. Thank you.
     
  19. Supermoto

    Supermoto NES Member

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    Do the wheels spin smoothly? If you take the chain off the front rings, do the cranks spin smoothly? How does the fork feel, compress smooth or is it sticking?
     
  20. TrackDayRdr

    TrackDayRdr NES Member

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    ME!!! Will be there on Friday late morning. Staying in a cabin owned by someone who is a somebody at the 'Fest. Looking forward to an amazing weekend.
     
  21. SpaceCritter

    SpaceCritter NES Member

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    I actually stay at the Wildflower, both so I'm on site if needed, and cuz the crowd is a little hard on the Asperger's, so I need a place to hide.
    41272391_2201957796707546_1752132733036920832_o.jpg
     
  22. ReluctantDecoy

    ReluctantDecoy

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    The wheels are currently grinding on the brake discs, but feel like the actual axle bearings are ok. Cranks spin ok with minimal issue. Front fork was initially crunch, but compresses ok now with no sticking. Not as smooth as I recall, but if this is self-lubricating, it should work better after some use (and clean up and new grease/lube).
     
  23. SpaceCritter

    SpaceCritter NES Member

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    "Before" (taken just outside my room at the Wildflower)

    20190625_184751.jpg
     
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  24. Ipe

    Ipe NES Member

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    Gonna look mighty different in 24-48 hours. Calm before the storm?
     
  25. Salyeica

    Salyeica NES Member

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    Question for the panel:

    How do you signal your approach on a dual/multi use trail? Was hiking at Snowbasin this morning on a hike/bike trail and imagined it would be a great spot to warm up before doing some lift serviced riding. However, I passed by a bunch of families on my trek and realized that it’s also a very dangerous spot.

    Do you have a method of notifying others on the trail of your arrival?

    Most of the riding I do is at HP, and nobody is really hiking the single tracks out there.
     
  26. Ipe

    Ipe NES Member

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    I've heard people using cow bells (passive notification), in the past I've used an Incredibel (active notification), I'm partial to being nice and in a pleasant tone saying "Hi there! :D". If you're in a group and leading its always nice to say "I've got "x" riders behind me", and the last rider nicely saying "Last One, thanks! :D

    Smiles and kindness typically help keep the peace
     
  27. Broccoli Iglesias

    Broccoli Iglesias NES Member

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    I yell: RIGHT, LEFT and pass them.

    But I usually go to places that you will find more than 50% of people on bikes, so people are used to it (I guess).

    I never had an issue at Bear Brook. And I went to the Blue Hills twice and never had an issue.

    I also ride as fast as possible, so people hear you coming. Bikes make noise.

    I slow down a lot if I see a little kid in a narrow trail.
     
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  28. Salyeica

    Salyeica NES Member

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    This is a single track trail with what’s ahead of you obscured by trees. I just don’t want to come around a corner and encounter a family of four out for a stroll.

    I suppose I should be yelling “hey bear!” periodically, as I’m in bear country out here.
     
  29. Supermoto

    Supermoto NES Member

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    If you are on singletrack and don't have a good sightline, then you need to go slow enough that you can stop in time. Hikers have the right of way, so slow down and ask to pass. A bell works great to alert people before hand, but don't expect them to get out of the way or even know why they are hearing a bell in the woods, they usually just stop in place to look around for the bell
     
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  30. Salyeica

    Salyeica NES Member

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    Exactly what I was looking for. Thanks!
     

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