Streaming to TV Questions

Lank

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Hi NES, I want to cut the cable and am looking into Roku and Chromecast. The issue is we have DSL (2.88 Mbps download speed, 0.75 upload)

My wife watches Netflix on her phone and occasionally has buffer issues.

Our wireless router is in the basement....

Can anyone recommend one streaming device over another? Any good/back experiences?
 

greencobra

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i've had roku for a year. steaming depends on your carrier. i have comcast and sometimes they cheat on the hd picture if the traffic is heavy. i wouldn't depend on super quality if your router is in the basement. ideally you want line of sight with the shortest distance but that's usually not practical in a home. make sure your router is rated for the distance you want to cover. i replaced my old router when i bought my roku. i measured the distance from point a to b, told the salesman and he hooked me up with a decent router for about 99 bucks. i have a netgear, certainly not the best but serviceable. there's a screen in the roku service section that will tell you what kind of signal your provider is giving you at a given time. it's a pretty good tool.

i have no experience with any other streaming device but did a lot of homework before choosing roku. i can't get more technical but in a nutshell, i'm happy with it.
 
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I have ROKU on my bedroom tv. Works great. But I also had DSL and I had to switch to Comcast because it wouldn't stream good at all... It was horrible on DSL especially when everybody is useing tablets phones ect. Perfect HD now no matter who useing what....
 

NH_Realtor

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I use apple TV and it works really well, the only thing it doesn't have it amazon prime on it but I can access that through my xbox. We have 1 apple tv in the living room and 1 in the bedroom and imo it does really well at picking up the wifi.
 

GaryO

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I didnt think they still had such slow download speeds. I just checked and my download is 95 and upload is 12 with Comcast.
 

swatgig

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Hi NES, I want to cut the cable and am looking into Roku and Chromecast. The issue is we have DSL (2.88 Mbps download speed, 0.75 upload)

My wife watches Netflix on her phone and occasionally has buffer issues.

Our wireless router is in the basement....

Can anyone recommend one streaming device over another? Any good/back experiences?
I used Netflix with a Chromecast with a similar (slow dsl) speed. The main reason I dumped it was because I would lose the connection when it rained, and Verizon refused to do anything about it. I ended up going back to cable.

Sometimes it would buffer, but that was generally tied to weather as well. Sometimes it just sucked.
 
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With your limited bandwidth streaming is going to be frustrating at best due to buffering and connection issues.

To mitigate that sort of situation, I've sent up a system that downloads TV shows to a local system and stream from that device.

For streaming devices the current selection as I remember is
Chromecast 2 - Get the new one, it's better than the first gen - Requires an external device to initiate/control the stream
Amazon FireStick - Integrates into Amazon and most of the streaming services
Roku - Haven't played with this in years, but I think it's similar to the FireStick
AppleTV - Local Apps that connect to all the services.


This guide might help you decide which one is best for you. http://thewirecutter.com/reviews/best-media-streamers/

Personally, I have ChromeCasts that I use to stream from my local content to the TV and it works fine.
 

Another_David

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hmmmm. I wonder if connecting a usb to tv is possible and running from lap top?
certainly. just depends on your tv.

many newer flat screens will let you plug in a USB with mp4 and then you play it right on your TV--no extra hardware. load mp4 to USB, walk it over to TV adn plug in. This is probably the most reliable but TV's usually won't play every type of format.

Chromcast will plug into an extra HDMI video port, then use power from a USB port on your TV and then you can cast whatever is on your computer or chomebook to your TV, but the quality can be fair to good depending on what you're casting.

Again it depends on the TV but DIVx will stream to TVs as well if you have a smart TV, which is connected to your network (ethernet or wifi). Run DIVx on your computer then it select your device to stream. The advantage of this is you can use various programs and play files that your TV might not support directly.
 
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It's not difficult to download TV and movies, the difficulty is in doing so legally.

It's not difficult to download TV and movies, the difficulty is in doing so legally. Once you have a hard drive full of vidoes, get the free Plex server software to stream them to FireStick, Chromecast, Roku, laptops, phones, tablets, etc.

One service that seems to solve this problem (I expect they will get sued out of existence) is PlayOn Plus. The paid version of PlayOn (Plus) records to your local Windows PC hard drive in mp4 format at up to 720p, but with really slow internet the app might not be able to reliably record HD video from Netflix, etc.

hmmmm. I wonder if connecting a usb to tv is possible and running from lap top?
Not worth the effort. Better to just "cast" or "mirror" your laptop screen to the TV.

Our wireless router is in the basement....Can anyone recommend one streaming device over another? Any good/back experiences?
If you're going to buy just one device for your TV, I would go with a Roku 2 or Roku 3 box. Supports just about every legal streaming service, works wired or wireless, can cast Android or Windows screens, and has a USB port so you can plug in a stick or external hard drive full of media.

Roku has wireless, but also an Ethernet port -- with Ethernet you can just skip the whole wireless complication, run a cord from the Roku to your router and your media storage computer and never worry about signal strength.
 
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natf

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A Roku box will give you the widest choice of services to stream from. They're what I'd recommend, but only if you can upgrade to a higher internet speed. Your internet connection isn't fast enough to support even standard definition video streaming through Netflix. It's close but Netflix recommends 3 Mbps for SD video and even though your DSL is close at 2.88 Mbps I doubt it consistently delivers that speed so you'll get stutters and drops to lower than standard definition video.

https://help.netflix.com/en/node/306
 

Spanz

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Our wireless router is in the basement....
?
well, move it to the 1st floor. when router signal strength goes down, they deliberately switch to lower data rate modulation schemes...hence buffering. the do sell reverse polarity cables so you could leave the router downstairs but have an antenna in the room you are in.
 
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well, move it to the 1st floor. when router signal strength goes down, they deliberately switch to lower data rate modulation schemes...hence buffering. the do sell reverse polarity cables so you could leave the router downstairs but have an antenna in the room you are in.
It's unlikely that his internal connection is causing the buffering when he's on dsl

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
 

CTpatriot

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Does the TV have as ethernet connection. I went direct from router to TV. I have DSL and have decent amazon streaming results.
 
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2.9Mbps wasn't considered to be "broadband" under even the old FCC definition. Most streaming services, including Netflix, will detect the slower link speed and downgrade video to below standard definition (SD) quality.

Does the TV have as ethernet connection. I went direct from router to TV. I have DSL and have decent amazon streaming results.
When you decide to set up an in-house media server (e.g. Plex), using Ethernet for the media server and wiring to the TV/Roku/Chromecast will not hurt, takes out one variable. But it won't fix sub-broadband speeds from your ISP.

Netflix stopped updating the client for many "smart" TVs, workaround is to use a Roku box. Then you can disconnect the TV from the Internet (one less appliance to secretly spy on you). At least the Roku 2 has neither a camera nor microphone.
 
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Rob Boudrie

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I have an Amazopn Firestick and it's great. The interface (especially for fast forward/reverse) is vastly than that build into my Samsung "smart TV", so I am thinking of getting one for that unit as well.
 

drumenigma

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I have an Amazopn Firestick and it's great. The interface (especially for fast forward/reverse) is vastly than that build into my Samsung "smart TV", so I am thinking of getting one for that unit as well.
I have had nothing but problems with my Firestick. Buffering issues, wifi connectivity issues, losing my log in credentials for services like Netflix. Personally I would avoid it like the plague.

I think the OP's main hurdle is going to be the internet speed to stream anything worth watching. Like some others have mentioned a work around may be to download video to your PC locally then stream it to the TV via HDMI output from the PC.

For a streaming device I would say stick with something like a gaming system, maybe the Fire TV, Roku, etc.... PC's also work well.
 

blindfire

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Hi NES, I want to cut the cable and am looking into Roku and Chromecast. The issue is we have DSL (2.88 Mbps download speed, 0.75 upload)

My wife watches Netflix on her phone and occasionally has buffer issues.

Our wireless router is in the basement....

Can anyone recommend one streaming device over another? Any good/back experiences?
I use a Chromecast with my wireless, but the issue is that if the microwave is used, the Chromecast will drop.

I'd go with a Roku and use an ethernet connection instead of wireless. Remember, you don't get the full bandwidth that is advertised. So, you don't get 54Mb/s, you'll be lucky to get half of that. Same with N or AC. If you need to maximize your capability, you should go wired if at all possible.

Good luck.
 

Rob Boudrie

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I use PlayOn to record Netflix shows so I can watch them on plane rides or in medical facilities which may not have decent internet.

PlayOn is moving into dangerous territory with its commercial skipping feature. The basic recording should be pretty well protected (see the Sony Betamax decision which shut down the TV/movie industry's attempt to outlaw home video recording of TV shows), however, PlayOn is treading on dangerous ground with commercial skipping. ReplayTV was sued for commercial skipping, and Dish was sued by Fox for the same feature. EFF.ORG reports that the cost of the suit put ReplayTV out of business. Dish won the Fox suit, with the court finding that commercial skipping on playback was fair use under the Sony Betamax case.
 

Another_David

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chiming in here again. I also only use wired or usb stick (sneaker net) since wireless sucks. The wifi access point supplied by my cable company won't go over 20 Mbps even though I'm paying for 125 mb/s! Rather than buy my own router, I just wired the pc and TV.

There's the Amazon Fire TV ($100) and then there's the Stick ($35). You get what you pay for! The stick is more like Chromecast and will be limited in the resolution it can support and can be slow, stuttery. I use my Chromecast to play the occasional you tube video on the tv but otherwise I use streaming across wired or just walk the USB thumb drive over to the TV. Then you can loan the thumb drive to friends and family, so I use that more often. You can get 32 GB thumbs for like $7!

TV's vary greatly in capability too but my LG smart TV runs netflix direct perfectly and supports many, but not all, video formats played from thumb drives.


http://www.speedtest.net/
 

CTpatriot

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2.9Mbps wasn't considered to be "broadband" under even the old FCC definition. Most streaming services, including Netflix, will detect the slower link speed and downgrade video to below standard definition (SD) quality.


When you decide to set up an in-house media server (e.g. Plex), using Ethernet for the media server and wiring to the TV/Roku/Chromecast will not hurt, takes out one variable. But it won't fix sub-broadband speeds from your ISP.

Netflix stopped updating the client for many "smart" TVs, workaround is to use a Roku box. Then you can disconnect the TV from the Internet (one less appliance to secretly spy on you). At least the Roku 2 has neither a camera nor microphone.
I have no idea what you said at least half of it, its me not you [laugh] my YouTube and amazon stream without buffering and looks like good picture, no skipping or stuttering. For the 25 dollar monthly internet and prime membership( mostly for the quick shipping) .I have an entertainment bargain
 
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Varmint

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There's the Amazon Fire TV ($100) and then there's the Stick ($35). You get what you pay for! The stick is more like Chromecast and will be limited in the resolution it can support and can be slow, stuttery. I use my Chromecast to play the occasional you tube video on the tv but otherwise I use streaming across wired or just walk the USB thumb drive over to the TV.
The Roku stick sucks too, get the regular Rokus.

+1 on using the thumb drive, that's always bulletproof and doesn't stutter.
 

sbi

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1. You really need to up your high speed internet, especially if you are looking to dump cable and rely on stream.

2. Kodi.
 

Lank

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Hi all, I really appreciate the input. I did have a lonnnng talk today with Comcast and it looks like I may be able to get high speed xfinity internet. They will have to patch my house on through the neighbors pole as my lines are underground. It will take some work but that's their problem. I will post any updates thanks again
 
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Hi all, I really appreciate the input. I did have a lonnnng talk today with Comcast and it looks like I may be able to get high speed xfinity internet. They will have to patch my house on through the neighbors pole as my lines are underground. It will take some work but that's their problem. I will post any updates thanks again
Good luck. A vote for chromecast 2 from me (super simple to use), but you really can't use any streaming media service very well until you get faster internet into your house.
 

ToddDubya

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I saw a huge improvement when I connected my PS3 directly to my router vs relying on wifi. Maybe my router was in a bad spot, maybe it's a crappy router but it just wasn't keeping up. It is literally 5' away on the other side of a wall and the quality sucked. Once I hooked up Cat5e cable I was fat dumb and happy.

Before all that I was using SSSLLLOOOOWWWW DSL over wifi (from a room upstairs) and it was great, go figure.
 
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All I read was "My internet is too slow to support streaming. What do you guys think I should get for a streaming device."
 
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