start to reloading, sort of

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I was wondering if any of you had some advice on the topic of reloading. I am fairly experienced in the shotshell reloading, but I would like to get into reloading brass. I have a RCBS press, with the appropriate dies. I need to know if any of you have come across a good manual for reloading. I really have no idea, especially the resizing. I really need the most basic of starts. MY grandfather gave me the equipment with the promise of teaching me, but he passed before that was possible. Any help would be appreciated.
 

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The resizing die will do this automatically (use Carbide ONLY for pistol) for you. Setup should be covered in the manuals I reference below.

Take a look at the Speer, Lyman and Lee reloading manuals. They have generic info on reloading at the front of each of the books.

Check out RCBS' step-by-step instructions on the web:
http://www.rcbs.com/default.asp?menu=1&s1=5&s2=15

Beyond that, buddy up with someone near you that has been reloading and watch what he does. That is how most of us learned. The manuals are good "fall back" options for the times we have a question.
 
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When I first started out, I was shown the Lyman manual. It covered everything that I needed to know, and the data was easy to read and understand.

Adam
 
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Lee Precision kit?

Anyone have any experience with the Lee Anniversary Kit that they market for low $$?

It appears to have everything needed (except for the dies) to get started, and their carbide pistol die sets are fairly inexpensive - I've seen them advertised for under $20.
 
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Lee Precision kit?

Anyone have any experience with the Lee Anniversary Kit that they market for low $$?

It appears to have everything needed (except for the dies) to get started, and their carbide pistol die sets are fairly inexpensive - I've seen them advertised for under $20.
 
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Lee Precision kit?

Anyone have any experience with the Lee Anniversary Kit that they market for low $$?

It appears to have everything needed (except for the dies) to get started, and their carbide pistol die sets are fairly inexpensive - I've seen them advertised for under $20.
 
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I cannot with a clear conscience recommend Lee, with the following exceptions:

Hand dies
Primer Seaters
Loading Manual (after you get a Sierra, Lyman, Hornady or Speer)
Some reloading dies (I've had so-so luck)
Casting equipment and moulds


I also hear their taper crimp dies are OK
 
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I cannot with a clear conscience recommend Lee, with the following exceptions:

Hand dies
Primer Seaters
Loading Manual (after you get a Sierra, Lyman, Hornady or Speer)
Some reloading dies (I've had so-so luck)
Casting equipment and moulds


I also hear their taper crimp dies are OK
 
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I cannot with a clear conscience recommend Lee, with the following exceptions:

Hand dies
Primer Seaters
Loading Manual (after you get a Sierra, Lyman, Hornady or Speer)
Some reloading dies (I've had so-so luck)
Casting equipment and moulds


I also hear their taper crimp dies are OK
 
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Nickle said:
I cannot with a clear conscience recommend Lee, with the following exceptions:

Hand dies
Primer Seaters
Loading Manual (after you get a Sierra, Lyman, Hornady or Speer)
Some reloading dies (I've had so-so luck)
Casting equipment and moulds


I also hear their taper crimp dies are OK

I have one of their taper crimp dies on my press. Actually it is a 2fer die. It seats and crimps in one stroke.

Adam
 
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Nickle said:
I cannot with a clear conscience recommend Lee, with the following exceptions:

Hand dies
Primer Seaters
Loading Manual (after you get a Sierra, Lyman, Hornady or Speer)
Some reloading dies (I've had so-so luck)
Casting equipment and moulds


I also hear their taper crimp dies are OK

I have one of their taper crimp dies on my press. Actually it is a 2fer die. It seats and crimps in one stroke.

Adam
 
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Nickle said:
I cannot with a clear conscience recommend Lee, with the following exceptions:

Hand dies
Primer Seaters
Loading Manual (after you get a Sierra, Lyman, Hornady or Speer)
Some reloading dies (I've had so-so luck)
Casting equipment and moulds


I also hear their taper crimp dies are OK

I have one of their taper crimp dies on my press. Actually it is a 2fer die. It seats and crimps in one stroke.

Adam
 

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Re: Lee Precision kit?

Ninemil said:
Anyone have any experience with the Lee Anniversary Kit that they market for low $$?

It appears to have everything needed (except for the dies) to get started, and their carbide pistol die sets are fairly inexpensive - I've seen them advertised for under $20.

This, and a set of their dies, would be an excellent and inexpensive way to see if you enjoy, or even want to start, reloading. If you like it you'll end up upgrading but that press can always be set up as a dedicated decapping press.
 

TonyD

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Re: Lee Precision kit?

Ninemil said:
Anyone have any experience with the Lee Anniversary Kit that they market for low $$?

It appears to have everything needed (except for the dies) to get started, and their carbide pistol die sets are fairly inexpensive - I've seen them advertised for under $20.

This, and a set of their dies, would be an excellent and inexpensive way to see if you enjoy, or even want to start, reloading. If you like it you'll end up upgrading but that press can always be set up as a dedicated decapping press.
 

TonyD

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Re: Lee Precision kit?

Ninemil said:
Anyone have any experience with the Lee Anniversary Kit that they market for low $$?

It appears to have everything needed (except for the dies) to get started, and their carbide pistol die sets are fairly inexpensive - I've seen them advertised for under $20.

This, and a set of their dies, would be an excellent and inexpensive way to see if you enjoy, or even want to start, reloading. If you like it you'll end up upgrading but that press can always be set up as a dedicated decapping press.
 

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The Lee dies I have work fine for me. I recommend the Final Crimp Die (FCD) for all pistol cartridges. It solves a lot of feeding problems.

I think I'd go with a Dillon Square Deal if I were starting. Better quality means less frustration and down time. Check the Yankee Swapper or its equivalent; you may get a whole reloading setup quite reasonably. [wink]
 

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The Lee dies I have work fine for me. I recommend the Final Crimp Die (FCD) for all pistol cartridges. It solves a lot of feeding problems.

I think I'd go with a Dillon Square Deal if I were starting. Better quality means less frustration and down time. Check the Yankee Swapper or its equivalent; you may get a whole reloading setup quite reasonably. [wink]
 

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The Lee dies I have work fine for me. I recommend the Final Crimp Die (FCD) for all pistol cartridges. It solves a lot of feeding problems.

I think I'd go with a Dillon Square Deal if I were starting. Better quality means less frustration and down time. Check the Yankee Swapper or its equivalent; you may get a whole reloading setup quite reasonably. [wink]
 
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What caliber ammo will you be reloading?
The anniversary kit, while having most everything you need to get going, is probably not the best option for pistol. This is a single stage press. That means that one operation is done at a time. You will have to decap all your brass, then you will have to prep the cases and prime, then you will have to fill the powder into all the cases, then actually seat the bullet, and crimp if not done together. While this is probably the best way to go for a beginner (one step at a time, checking in between stages for errors) it will probably not put out the volume of ammo, in the amount of time that most people are willing to devote to.

I started reloading with the Lee Pro 1000 progressive press. http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=351321

It got me into reloading VERY cheap, and I am still using that press for all my 45ACP. It works great, and I am able to do over 250 rounds per hour without putting much effort into it.

But, like Tony said the anniversary kit would be a great way to try reloading without much of an investment.
However, the Pro1000 can be purchased for $119 all ready to go, with dies included, and can also be used single stage going station to station once round at a time until you are familiar enough with the process to start working in full progressive mode.

Just something to think about.

Adam
 
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What caliber ammo will you be reloading?
The anniversary kit, while having most everything you need to get going, is probably not the best option for pistol. This is a single stage press. That means that one operation is done at a time. You will have to decap all your brass, then you will have to prep the cases and prime, then you will have to fill the powder into all the cases, then actually seat the bullet, and crimp if not done together. While this is probably the best way to go for a beginner (one step at a time, checking in between stages for errors) it will probably not put out the volume of ammo, in the amount of time that most people are willing to devote to.

I started reloading with the Lee Pro 1000 progressive press. http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=351321

It got me into reloading VERY cheap, and I am still using that press for all my 45ACP. It works great, and I am able to do over 250 rounds per hour without putting much effort into it.

But, like Tony said the anniversary kit would be a great way to try reloading without much of an investment.
However, the Pro1000 can be purchased for $119 all ready to go, with dies included, and can also be used single stage going station to station once round at a time until you are familiar enough with the process to start working in full progressive mode.

Just something to think about.

Adam
 
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What caliber ammo will you be reloading?
The anniversary kit, while having most everything you need to get going, is probably not the best option for pistol. This is a single stage press. That means that one operation is done at a time. You will have to decap all your brass, then you will have to prep the cases and prime, then you will have to fill the powder into all the cases, then actually seat the bullet, and crimp if not done together. While this is probably the best way to go for a beginner (one step at a time, checking in between stages for errors) it will probably not put out the volume of ammo, in the amount of time that most people are willing to devote to.

I started reloading with the Lee Pro 1000 progressive press. http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=351321

It got me into reloading VERY cheap, and I am still using that press for all my 45ACP. It works great, and I am able to do over 250 rounds per hour without putting much effort into it.

But, like Tony said the anniversary kit would be a great way to try reloading without much of an investment.
However, the Pro1000 can be purchased for $119 all ready to go, with dies included, and can also be used single stage going station to station once round at a time until you are familiar enough with the process to start working in full progressive mode.

Just something to think about.

Adam
 
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Adam_MA said:
What caliber ammo will you be reloading?
The anniversary kit, while having most everything you need to get going, is probably not the best option for pistol. This is a single stage press. That means that one operation is done at a time. You will have to decap all your brass, then you will have to prep the cases and prime, then you will have to fill the powder into all the cases, then actually seat the bullet, and crimp if not done together. While this is probably the best way to go for a beginner (one step at a time, checking in between stages for errors) it will probably not put out the volume of ammo, in the amount of time that most people are willing to devote to.

I started reloading with the Lee Pro 1000 progressive press. http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=351321

It got me into reloading VERY cheap, and I am still using that press for all my 45ACP. It works great, and I am able to do over 250 rounds per hour without putting much effort into it.

But, like Tony said the anniversary kit would be a great way to try reloading without much of an investment.
However, the Pro1000 can be purchased for $119 all ready to go, with dies included, and can also be used single stage going station to station once round at a time until you are familiar enough with the process to start working in full progressive mode.

Just something to think about.

Adam

Well I have some equipment that my late grandfather left me. It looks like an RCBS press, but I am not sure. The stuff is quite a bit different from my shotshell press. I woul dbe mainly reloading my inherited(also from my grandfather) Rem .222. He left me an old Remington 700 Chambered in that, with quite a few bags of empty brass that he hadn't gotten to. Along with that I would be reloading 7MM Rem Mag and the occasional .45 ACP. I will have to go unpack the presses and get back to you on what they are. I know my fiancee's dad gave me a set of dies for the 7mm and I already have the dies for the .222. I just basicall need to know the proecedure, because I understand it to be much more exact than the shotshell I am used to. Thank for the help all.
 
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Adam_MA said:
What caliber ammo will you be reloading?
The anniversary kit, while having most everything you need to get going, is probably not the best option for pistol. This is a single stage press. That means that one operation is done at a time. You will have to decap all your brass, then you will have to prep the cases and prime, then you will have to fill the powder into all the cases, then actually seat the bullet, and crimp if not done together. While this is probably the best way to go for a beginner (one step at a time, checking in between stages for errors) it will probably not put out the volume of ammo, in the amount of time that most people are willing to devote to.

I started reloading with the Lee Pro 1000 progressive press. http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=351321

It got me into reloading VERY cheap, and I am still using that press for all my 45ACP. It works great, and I am able to do over 250 rounds per hour without putting much effort into it.

But, like Tony said the anniversary kit would be a great way to try reloading without much of an investment.
However, the Pro1000 can be purchased for $119 all ready to go, with dies included, and can also be used single stage going station to station once round at a time until you are familiar enough with the process to start working in full progressive mode.

Just something to think about.

Adam

Well I have some equipment that my late grandfather left me. It looks like an RCBS press, but I am not sure. The stuff is quite a bit different from my shotshell press. I woul dbe mainly reloading my inherited(also from my grandfather) Rem .222. He left me an old Remington 700 Chambered in that, with quite a few bags of empty brass that he hadn't gotten to. Along with that I would be reloading 7MM Rem Mag and the occasional .45 ACP. I will have to go unpack the presses and get back to you on what they are. I know my fiancee's dad gave me a set of dies for the 7mm and I already have the dies for the .222. I just basicall need to know the proecedure, because I understand it to be much more exact than the shotshell I am used to. Thank for the help all.
 
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Adam_MA said:
What caliber ammo will you be reloading?
The anniversary kit, while having most everything you need to get going, is probably not the best option for pistol. This is a single stage press. That means that one operation is done at a time. You will have to decap all your brass, then you will have to prep the cases and prime, then you will have to fill the powder into all the cases, then actually seat the bullet, and crimp if not done together. While this is probably the best way to go for a beginner (one step at a time, checking in between stages for errors) it will probably not put out the volume of ammo, in the amount of time that most people are willing to devote to.

I started reloading with the Lee Pro 1000 progressive press. http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=351321

It got me into reloading VERY cheap, and I am still using that press for all my 45ACP. It works great, and I am able to do over 250 rounds per hour without putting much effort into it.

But, like Tony said the anniversary kit would be a great way to try reloading without much of an investment.
However, the Pro1000 can be purchased for $119 all ready to go, with dies included, and can also be used single stage going station to station once round at a time until you are familiar enough with the process to start working in full progressive mode.

Just something to think about.

Adam

Well I have some equipment that my late grandfather left me. It looks like an RCBS press, but I am not sure. The stuff is quite a bit different from my shotshell press. I woul dbe mainly reloading my inherited(also from my grandfather) Rem .222. He left me an old Remington 700 Chambered in that, with quite a few bags of empty brass that he hadn't gotten to. Along with that I would be reloading 7MM Rem Mag and the occasional .45 ACP. I will have to go unpack the presses and get back to you on what they are. I know my fiancee's dad gave me a set of dies for the 7mm and I already have the dies for the .222. I just basicall need to know the proecedure, because I understand it to be much more exact than the shotshell I am used to. Thank for the help all.
 
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The reloading process for rifle ammo is a bit different than for pistol. My first suggestion would be to make your way to your favorite gun shop and pick up a copy of

"Lyman 48th Edition Reloading Handbook"

The book will take you through the process step by step and has the reloading data for the ammo you are looking to reload.

Once you read through the process come back here and post specific questions.

I only reload handgun ammo right now, mainly because I shoot FAR more pistol than rifle, and I don't do any competition shooting with rifle that would dictate specific precision loaded cartridges.

Hope this helps
Adam
 
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The reloading process for rifle ammo is a bit different than for pistol. My first suggestion would be to make your way to your favorite gun shop and pick up a copy of

"Lyman 48th Edition Reloading Handbook"

The book will take you through the process step by step and has the reloading data for the ammo you are looking to reload.

Once you read through the process come back here and post specific questions.

I only reload handgun ammo right now, mainly because I shoot FAR more pistol than rifle, and I don't do any competition shooting with rifle that would dictate specific precision loaded cartridges.

Hope this helps
Adam
 
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The reloading process for rifle ammo is a bit different than for pistol. My first suggestion would be to make your way to your favorite gun shop and pick up a copy of

"Lyman 48th Edition Reloading Handbook"

The book will take you through the process step by step and has the reloading data for the ammo you are looking to reload.

Once you read through the process come back here and post specific questions.

I only reload handgun ammo right now, mainly because I shoot FAR more pistol than rifle, and I don't do any competition shooting with rifle that would dictate specific precision loaded cartridges.

Hope this helps
Adam
 
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