Smoking a brisket and a pork butt tomorrow

djbradles

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I’ve never done such a costly and long cook before. Done tons of research from the likes of Aaron Franklin, Cooking with Ry, T-roy Cook’s, BBQ Pit boys, you name it.

Tomorrow morning I’m starting the cook with my Weber 22” kettle with a offset slow burn for upwards of 9+ hours at 275F. I’ll be doing the water pan, wrap, spritzing, rest, etc.


Any victories and failures from the NES brain trust for posterity purposes?
 
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Keep constant temps - beware of the breeze, it will rob heat. Invest in a Party-Q controller. Pay attention to internal temps and take temps at several locations - pull at appropriate temps.

Brisket - 203* is the temp
Butt is another thing but pull at appropriate temp and both need rest. Any cooler will do.

Are you doing a full packer brisket? Because it will be ready on Sunday given your start time.
Skip the spritz - if you're looking you ain't cookin' - wasted heat opening and closing.

Good luck - keep us posted
 

Hustler One

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With a kettle I prefer the snake method burn. I use a "moisture' pan as well but filled with a mix of water and AC vinegar. Put the soaked wood chunks on top of the grate instead of laying directly on the charcoal if you do that. Sometimes I mop the meat, sometimes I don't. Most importantly, keep an eye on the temp. I think 275F is a little high for brisket - I do 225-250F. Brisket is one of the hardest cuts of beef to get right. I've probably smoked a couple dozen briskets now in my amateur bbq adventures and only "killed" one and that was by not paying attention to the temp. Good luck.
 

djbradles

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Good stuff. I’m cooking both in the kettle at the same time. The brisket is small cut of flat. The pork butt is small cut of boneless. This is for the purpose of testing only before some rather important a Cook’s. Most of what ya’ll posted was dead on with what I intend. I’m doing just salt and pepper for rub. I’m not using May temp controllers and I know that sounds stupid but I don’t want to invest in too much equipment for cost purposes. I just wanna know this kettle like my right hand. I’ve been grilling for years on a Genesis but wow is what I’m getting into more involved!

I was in vacation last week and the week before and did some indirect Tomahawks that stunned me for quality and taste. This was in my Mom’s old Weber kettle with the lower vents. rusted clean off. With Amazon fast shipping I ordered a Weber copper kettle to match my Genesis with the chimney and cover.
 

dlarge

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Definitely don't keep peeking. You'll lose temperature consistency and probably get stressed out over it. Also, don't be afraid to throw in a half chimney or so of hot charcoals to keep temperatures steady.
 

djbradles

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275F is too high.
don't you mean 225 or so?
T-Roy Cook’s did a rather large 13 lb? Prime brisket on a Weber at 375f with excellent results. This is called the hot and fast method. It looked delicious though it didn’t quite have the pull test qualities of a Franklin it did have great bark and great color.
 

dlarge

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Kettle temps are always going to be higher than actual grill temp, and probably not all that accurate to begin with...
 

djbradles

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2 solid hours in and the grate level temp is 250F. Temp probe was placed into the center of the butt and it’s reading 125F. Long time to go!

The initial high temp was due to a double stack of the hot coals on the first corner of the snake. I’m thinking it will not be until 6-8pm that this maybe ready. At the least the pork should be ready if not the brisket.
 

djbradles

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Ok. Looking through the top vents with a high power led the bark is looking very good but not blackish yet. Internal temp of the butt is 161F. I may wait a little longer to wrap since I want that black bark.
 

djbradles

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Just pulled em both off. To be precise it was the flat end of the brisket that I bought from the butcher, no point was included. Both internal temps were 203f for the brisket and 207f for the Pork. A little high for the pork but that is more forgiving.

I made up a sweet bbq sauce and a Carolina mustard sauce heavy on the vinegar. I’m gonna let the pork rest 1 hour then pull. I’ll let the brisket sit upwards of 2 hrs. Pics to come in due time.
 

NewGuyRay

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Good stuff. I’m cooking both in the kettle at the same time. The brisket is small cut of flat. The pork butt is small cut of boneless. This is for the purpose of testing only before some rather important a Cook’s. Most of what ya’ll posted was dead on with what I intend. I’m doing just salt and pepper for rub. I’m not using May temp controllers and I know that sounds stupid but I don’t want to invest in too much equipment for cost purposes. I just wanna know this kettle like my right hand. I’ve been grilling for years on a Genesis but wow is what I’m getting into more involved!

I was in vacation last week and the week before and did some indirect Tomahawks that stunned me for quality and taste. This was in my Mom’s old Weber kettle with the lower vents. rusted clean off. With Amazon fast shipping I ordered a Weber copper kettle to match my Genesis with the chimney and cover.
Something to consider...

"...
No salt in rubs!
Salt penetrates, so the amount we apply depends on the weight of the meat. All the rest are huge molecules that rarely go beyond 1/8" deep. Spices and herbs are a surface treatment just like sauces so the amount we apply depends on the per square inches of surface.

Applying the salt separately and in advance is a very important technique called dry brining. Dry brining is simply salting thick cuts the day before cooking and thin cuts an hour or two before. Adding salt in advance is good for the meat because it melts on the wet surface of meat and it penetrates deep. You should click this link and read more about dry brining."
..."
The Science Of Rubs
 
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