Single Stage Press Recommendation

NewGuyRay

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Can anyone offer some thoughts on cost and benefits of Hornady vs Redding for single stage presses and dies?

Initially the plan would be to use the press for a variety of calibers, 9mm, .40, .357 Sig, and .223.

Eventually I would like to get a progressive press like the Dillon 650 and be able to reuse at least the handgun caliber dies in it. The single stage press would likely be re-purposed for loading match grade ammo probably in .308 and/or .300 Win Mag and possibly others.

Does this even make sense?
 

jasons

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Can anyone offer some thoughts on cost and benefits of Hornady vs Redding for single stage presses and dies?

Initially the plan would be to use the press for a variety of calibers, 9mm, .40, .357 Sig, and .223.

Eventually I would like to get a progressive press like the Dillon 650 and be able to reuse at least the handgun caliber dies in it. The single stage press would likely be re-purposed for loading match grade ammo probably in .308 and/or .300 Win Mag and possibly others.

Does this even make sense?

The Hornady presses use "quick change" bushings which are pretty handy. If you end up going with a Hornady progressive it might be cool to have the same setup on both your progressive and single stage. If you're set on the Dillon (which frankly is a better press,) then that might not matter as much to you.

My favorite single stage is the Forster Co-Ax. I believe it's a better design than any other single stage.

For high-volume loading on a progressive I use a Hornady Lock and Load AP with a case feeder, but truthfully I'd much rather have a Dillon 650. The Hornady is not a bad press, but it's finicky. The Dillon is a bit more refined (but also a lot more money.)

For dies, hands down Dillon makes the best for use in a progressive. They have a nice wide chamfer on the mouth to guide the case in, and the "guts" can be removed for cleaning without taking the whole die out. They would work fine on a single stage as well.
 

mac1911

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I have the hornady classic I like the quick change die set up. I cycle through loading for 9 Cals. I have a lot more time to load than shoot so speed is not high on my list for reloading. The quick change bushings can be a added expense if your looking for a budget. I have 40 bushings 31 are in use. I bought the kit. If I had to do it again I might not get thechornsdy kit. I didnt like the scale....actual the only thing I use from the kit is the press, powder drop and data book. It produces fine ammo.
The newer offering from hornady. Classic deluxe kit offers a lot more than the kit I have. Comes with lock rings bushings bullet puller both rifle and pistol rotors for powder drop. Powder drop stand and some other items.
 

EddieCoyle

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Why just Hornady and Redding?

You really can't go wrong with an RCBS Rockchucker. It's better built than the Hornady (I can't speak for the Redding because I don't have one).

If you like the idea of quick-change bushings, for under $15, you can buy a Hornady L-N-L adapter (that comes with three bushings) to fit the Rockchucker. I have two of them set up this way.

The Hornady presses use "quick change" bushings which are pretty handy. If you end up going with a Hornady progressive it might be cool to have the same setup on both your progressive and single stage.

The problem with that is the die height in the L-N-L single stage and L-N-L progressive is not the same. If you move a die from one to the other, you need to adjust the height, which kind of defeats the purpose of the bushings.

As long as it is blue..........

Which of their single-stage presses do you recommend?
 
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jasons

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F055F93A-81B0-4939-82E0-150BAF34E5AF-701-00000094DF9C7D91.jpg


Forster Co-Ax on the left, Hornady L-n-L AP on the right.
 

Woodstock

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At least one of the Redding presses can accept the Hornady LnL bushing system. You really can't go wrong with any of the three. If later you decide on a Dillon progressive, you can sell the LnL bushings here on the classified page and return the single stage press to the 7/8" configuration. Don't be afraid of a used press, either. I just bought a big old Lyman Orange Crusher from one of the NES guys, and it works fine, as does my old Hornady-Pacific 007 single stage. They get used for things like resizing rifle cases and loading the oddball rifle calibers. Pistol ammo and higher-volume rifle stuff gets loaded on a Dillon 550B I've had since around 1985.
 
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The problem with that is the die height in the L-N-L single stage and L-N-L progressive is not the same. If you move a die from one to the other, you need to adjust the height, which kind of defeats the purpose of the bushings.

I like my Hornady single stage that I use to prep rifle brass. The "feature" listed above drives me nuts too. I guess I have Dillon-envy as well, I want to have a tube of primers explode and have to buy extra parts to capture spent primers! [rofl]

Chris
 
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If I was you and I was looking for a press i would get neither of the two. I really like the rcbs company, they are awesome and have great customer service. I have a rock chucker and love it but if I had to do it again I wouldn't. The co-ax is nice looking but I don't like the feel of it for reloading a few hundred rounds. I like the quick change dies but the arm is poorly positioned and the primer position is horible. If a primer goes off its burning your arm as you reach over the press to seat it. If it was me I would go with a turret press for the same cash. You can have two to three die sets set up and the powder dropper on the turret. That would be the way I would go, pull the lever decap, index prime an powder drop, index place bullet pull lever and finished bullet. Just my 2cents good luck with your new press which ever you choose.
Rock chucker $160
Co-ax $300
Rcbs turret $215
Redding turret $300
 
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Another vote for the RCBS if you're dead set on a single stage. Fair Warning: I bought my RCBS single stage less than a year ago... I current wish that I had just spent the money and gone to a progressive. For reference: I reload 9mm, 45acp, .38 special, and I'm just starting to reload .223.

If you don't want to spend a lot, I would even start looking at a Lee Load-Master. I've been reading a bunch of reviews, and it appears they've made some changes that help the priming issues they were previously having.

Good luck! Once you get bit by the reloading bug, it's all but impossible to get rid of.
 

drgrant

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I've always liked this photo as an indication of which press to acquire...

View attachment 76091


The only thing bad about the newer style rockchuckers is the priming arm sucks, and the little screw that holds the arm in place eventually will snap off inside the press. I used a hand primer anyways, but it's something to watch out for.

-Mike
 

NewGuyRay

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Why just Hornady and Redding?

You really can't go wrong with an RCBS Rockchucker. It's better built than the Hornady (I can't speak for the Redding because I don't have one).

If you like the idea of quick-change bushings, for under $15, you can buy a Hornady L-N-L adapter (that comes with three bushings) to fit the Rockchucker. I have two of them set up this way.



The problem with that is the die height in the L-N-L single stage and L-N-L progressive is not the same. If you move a die from one to the other, you need to adjust the height, which kind of defeats the purpose of the bushings.



Which of their single-stage presses do you recommend?

I may be misremembering but I thought during your reloading class, you had expressed a preference for the Hornady single stage over the RCBS because of something having to do with the camming action and it being easier to find the exact top of travel for the shell plate? Or I could have it backwards!
 
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