shotgun hunting

milktree

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I've had two students recently who already hunt, but with bows. They've both got their hunter's ed. certs and stuff, already know how to kill and dress a deer.

They both want to hunt birds with a shotgun.

I know just enough about shotguns to sound like an expert to people who know nothing about shotguns.

I'd like to recommend a course, or proxy, on shotgun hunting. I've already told them the basics of "here's your body position" and "follow the target with your whole torso, don't move just the shotgun" and "hang out with the trap guys 'cuz they know what they're talking about". But I don't think that really addresses the "how to hunt with a shotgun" adequately.

So, where, in north east Mass., should I tell them to go?
 
Take them to a Trap and/or Skeet range, and break some clays. This will get them used to shooting, and missing some.

Then, take them out for Sporting Clays, so they can miss more of them. [laugh]

When it comes to hunting, the new hunter has to realize that it's hunting, not bird-shooting, unless you have a location with no other hunters, a crapton of birds, and, preferably a dog.

Unless you're at a stocked preserve, or some place in the midwest where you still get big flocks on corn fields, a day in the field may give zero shots.

The last time I went upland bird hunting, in 6 -7 hours I got two shots (one pheasant, and the most perfect field shot I've ever made, with witnesses! Yes, I'm bragging a bit...), but I was the guest, and the dog's owner gave me the first shot of the day (ring neck) and I was in position for the quail. I think the other two guys got maybe 3 shots between them the whole day.

There is intense pressure on the stocked areas. Private land that's huntable is tough to find. I guess hunting up a place to hunt is the first hunt.

Ideally, if they belong to a Club, and let it be known that they are looking for a sensei, perhaps someone will take them out.
 
Take them to a Trap and/or Skeet range, and break some clays. This will get them used to shooting, and missing some.

Then, take them out for Sporting Clays, so they can miss more of them. [laugh]

When it comes to hunting, the new hunter has to realize that it's hunting, not bird-shooting, unless you have a location with no other hunters, a crapton of birds, and, preferably a dog.

Unless you're at a stocked preserve, or some place in the midwest where you still get big flocks on corn fields, a day in the field may give zero shots.

The last time I went upland bird hunting, in 6 -7 hours I got two shots (one pheasant, and the most perfect field shot I've ever made, with witnesses! Yes, I'm bragging a bit...), but I was the guest, and the dog's owner gave me the first shot of the day (ring neck) and I was in position for the quail. I think the other two guys got maybe 3 shots between them the whole day.

There is intense pressure on the stocked areas. Private land that's huntable is tough to find. I guess hunting up a place to hunt is the first hunt.

Ideally, if they belong to a Club, and let it be known that they are looking for a sensei, perhaps someone will take them out.
This is why I tell me wife "I'm taking the shotgun for a walk" when I leave the house. Honestly if it were as easy as shooting birds I wouldn't go. I've been 2 years in a row to preserve pheasant hunts and I have fun.....because it's time spent with veterans and friends mire than the actual "shooting of birds" which is really what it is on a preserve hunt like that. If it weren't a free program for veterans I'd never pay for a preserve bird hunt.

I am a small game fanatic at heart anyway. I'll hunt rabbit and squirrel before the welfare hunting stocked pheasants in mass and nh any day
 
How to hunt upland birds with a shotgun? Be wicked quick. Ha Ha. Walk miles and be alert the whole time. Soon as you stop being hyper alert the bird pops out. Oh, trap and 5 stand won't hurt either. Practice trap, 5 stand and sporting clays from a low hold.
 
How to hunt upland birds with a shotgun? Be wicked quick. Ha Ha. Walk miles and be alert the whole time. Soon as you stop being hyper alert the bird pops out. Oh, trap and 5 stand won't hurt either. Practice trap, 5 stand and sporting clays from a low hold.
It's a good idea to let the other people on the Trap line know that you're going to shoot from a low-gun start, and why, as it's not typical. I'd not say, "No," on a line I was running, especially if I knew that the person was safe, but I'd be extra-vigilant with a shooter I did not know.

That said, maybe I'll come up with a gun-down event for a match this season.....[thinking]
 
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