Shooting low and left

Dmiller27

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I participate in weekly steel shoot for the past few weeks and I keep shooting low and left. Any suggestions on drills to do to get my grip right with the quick draw? Shooting S&W 9mm full size
 

Uzi2

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Try taping up or ace wrapping your wrist and provide more support with your left hand against the side of your pistol.

Practice dry firing more to build muscle memory and smoothe out your trigger pull, then practice more live fire.

Relax your grip a bit and pull the trigger straight back.....less finger in the trigger.
 

TSL001

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You're most likely anticipating the recoil and dipping your hands down. I suggest dry firing and after that some more dry firing. View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PUadUOC7FJk
Check out this video with Doug Koenig.

Also, randomly put in a couple of dummy rounds when you practice live firing. That's a sure way to know if your muzzle dips down anticipating the recoil. Good luck.
 

ldi

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I participate in weekly steel shoot for the past few weeks and I keep shooting low and left. Any suggestions on drills to do to get my grip right with the quick draw? Shooting S&W 9mm full size
I had the same issue with one of the pistols.
I’ve tried everything under the sun it seems to remedy it and nothing worked consistently, until Len pointed out for me to adjust my thumb.
He said - bring your thumb up higher - simple, right?!
I’ve never had that - “Low left” problem since.
Thanks Len !)
 

45collector

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A lighter trigger pull may help
To some extent yes. But a lighter trigger pull doesn’t make up for a lack of fundamentals. Most people who start shooting pistol without some basic guidance will develop bad habits immediately.
When I try to help people with this stuff I start with the basics:
Grip
Stance
A slow, consistent, increasing pressure applied to the trigger until it breaks
Keeping a perfect sight picture aligned on the target, undisturbed throughout the trigger pull
Follow through (regaining the sight picture on the target after muzzle flip)

There’s a lot more to it, but working on those basics will help a new shooter greatly.
 

M1911

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Stop flinching, learn to call your shots. Its all mental
This. The problem isn’t your grip.

Learn to pull the trigger quickly without disturbing the sights. Do that with dry fire.

You’ll know you’re not flinching when you see the slide cycle and the brass casing eject from the gun.
 

cockpitbob

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You're most likely anticipating the recoil and dipping your hands down. I suggest dry firing and after that some more dry firing. View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PUadUOC7FJk
Check out this video with Doug Koenig.

Also, randomly put in a couple of dummy rounds when you practice live firing. That's a sure way to know if your muzzle dips down anticipating the recoil. Good luck.
This is exactly what I was going to say. Especially mixing snapcaps into the mag.
 

Dmiller27

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Thank you all for the help!!! I'm going to work on dry firing and isolation of each movement. Is it ok to dry fire?
 

Supermoto

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Thank you all for the help!!! I'm going to work on dry firing and isolation of each movement. Is it ok to dry fire?
Dry firing is great but realize what it can and cannot do.
Grab your gun, dry fire. Did your sights move during any portion of the trigger break? Yes. Work on it until it doesn't
If your sights didn't move, then dry firing isn't going to help. No one flinches during dry fire

Dry fire is awesome for practicing your draw and reload, make sure your are practicing correct form, you don't want to have to unlearn hours of mistakes
 

HarryPottar

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One technique that really worked for me and highlighted an issue which I was able to correct.

Purchase some dummy practice snap cap rounds, then have a friend load your magazine intermixing randomly the snap caps with live rounds.

Now when you shoot you won't know what is next, live or snap cap. On the snap cap rounds, see if you are anticipating the recoil and flinching, pulling to the left etc.

Harry
 

juice

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Try holding the grip against a table while dry firing to learn the feel of the trigger. A tool like the MantisX (no affiliation) can help.
 

cockpitbob

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Dry fire is awesome for practicing your draw and reload, make sure your are practicing correct form, you don't want to have to unlearn hours of mistakes
One of the best little sayings I've heard is:

"Practice doesn't make perfect. Practice makes permanent.".

Practice the wrong technique and it'll take a lot of work to undo the damage.
 

SERE

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If you mean fine for the gun? Yes. Dry firing only damages the gun if its rim-fire. Center-fire is good to go.
Mostly. Some center fire that have stupid mag disconnects can have problems. I know one Ruger and think others have this problem. Don't forget snap caps, too.
 
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