Schools This Fall

Inside Out

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Usually, it’s the most wonderful time of the year!

But not this year — it’s not looking good for a return to school, at least for anything approaching full-time. For anyone with a job and kids, this probably is terrible (though not unexpected) news.

I’m trying to think this through — are there any realistic alternatives? What are you doing to get ready? I am already buying more printer ink and making sure the kids have a workstation. Will private/religious schools have in-person class or will they be muzzled like public schools?

(For those who would suggest we should all be home-schooling already, that’s not an option for me at least for several reasons.)

We spend a lot of time talking about food and gun preps, so this is a prep thread of a different sort.
 

Canndo

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I’ve got a daughter at a Catholic HS and a son at Penn State. They’re both going back. Daughter has 3 ft rules in class, no sports etc. etc. Son is going into a Frat house. He has 1/2 online 1/2 small classes. Both have mask requirements. No tuition reductions. Everything subject to change. I don’t know what to do. [frown]
 

Inside Out

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People dependent on public schools need to be lobbying hard to get them to end this bullshit.
In Massachusetts, it’s like lobbying against gun control. Falls on deaf ears. Because children.

The hashtag #14daysnonewcases (or something like that) is taking hold: some teachers are now insisting on a 14 day period of no infections (!!) before returning to school. Zero chance of that in 2020, and maybe 2021. But they will probably get their way.
 

Inside Out

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Nobody knows. Nobody.

Embrace ambiguity. It's all we've got right now in public schools, and I'm being completely honest.
Agreed. You’re a teacher — don’t know if you’re a parent too but assume you are, and assume schools aren’t going back in person. What are you doing, now, to get ready for that?
 

JayMcB

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In Massachusetts, it’s like lobbying against gun control. Falls on deaf ears. Because children.

The hashtag #14daysnonewcases (or something like that) is taking hold: some teachers are now insisting on a 14 day period of no infections (!!) before returning to school. Zero chance of that in 2020, and maybe 2021. But they will probably get their way.
I think they should be welcome to their opinion, and if they want to resign their positions and lose their seniority and pensions....it's fine.

There is a crop of freshly graduated education majors who are facing a 15% unemployment rate...and in a low infection rate demographic, ready to work...it's fine. Send it.
 

LuvDog

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I highly doubt the public K-12 schools will be opening back up full time. At most 1/2 onsite and 1/2 remote. They’ll also be restricting busses. So even if your kid does go back, you’ll still have to figure out how to get them there and back
 

ASHDUMP

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I think they should be welcome to their opinion, and if they want to resign their positions and lose their seniority and pensions....it's fine.

There is a crop of freshly graduated education majors who are facing a 15% unemployment rate...and in a low infection rate demographic, ready to work...it's fine. Send it.
...but unions.
 

Picton

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Agreed. You’re a teacher — don’t know if you’re a parent too but assume you are, and assume schools aren’t going back in person. What are you doing, now, to get ready for that?
I've been at my school for five hours over the past two days, figuring all that out.

Bottom line: nobody knows right now. That truly is the only answer possible. You want certainty no more than I do; nobody can give you that.
 

ASHDUMP

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I've been at my school for five hours over the past two days, figuring all that out.

Bottom line: nobody knows right now. That truly is the only answer possible. You want certainty no more than I do; nobody can give you that.
Because no one is leading. We see the data... We know the trends. Americans have learned a lot recently. We're ready to get back to work [and school].
 

Varmint

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In Massachusetts, it’s like lobbying against gun control. Falls on deaf ears. Because children.

The hashtag #14daysnonewcases (or something like that) is taking hold: some teachers are now insisting on a 14 day period of no infections (!!) before returning to school. Zero chance of that in 2020, and maybe 2021. But they will probably get their way.
It's cause the teachers all have pre-existing conditions. It's for the teachers.
 

Picton

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Because no one is leading. We see the data... We know the trends. Americans have learned a lot recently. We're ready to get back to work [and school].
You're preaching to the choir.

Our leader is... Charlie Baker. Feel free to punch a wall or grimace or pour a drink; it's about all you can do.

All I know is that every school is going to be in a completely different situation. The people meeting at my school absolutely want to go back, have no patience for this "hybrid" bullshit, and are willing to try to make remote learning work. But I'm in a high school; the issues I'm discussing right now are very different than what my first grader's and my sixth grader's schools are discussing.

Some of us are more comfortable with ambiguity than others, but we're all in the same boat here.
 

Inside Out

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To be clear, I’m not interested in assigning responsibility, or blame.

I’m more interested in assuming the worst case (another year of dreadful “remote learning”) and planning what to do to get ready; why we ultimately land there isn’t that important.

I don’t want September to roll around and think “I wish I had done/bought/thought of that.”
 

Picton

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To be clear, I’m not interested in assigning responsibility, or blame.

I’m more interested in assuming the worst case (another year of dreadful “remote learning”) and planning what to do to get ready; why we ultimately land there isn’t that important.

I don’t want September to roll around and think “I wish I had done/bought/thought of that.”
I feel your pain, firsthand.

Figure out the worst course of action (remote learning) and try to plan for that. Then, figure out the most likely course of action ("hybrid," which I spent all day discussing) and try to plan for that.

My principal thinks the state will encourage schools to start hybrid, though that won't work in my building (for a lot of reasons too technical to bother with here) nor, I suspect, a lot of smaller high schools. They might do that by fiat; I don't know. If the state starts "remote," my principal sees difficulty in later going in-person. I don't know whether he's hearing things behind the scenes; nobody knows nothin,' for sure.

Again, this is the ultimate YMMV. My building and my principal are not yours, and the circumstances will be a million kinds of different.
 

Picton

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To be clear, I’m not interested in assigning responsibility, or blame.

I’m more interested in assuming the worst case (another year of dreadful “remote learning”) and planning what to do to get ready; why we ultimately land there isn’t that important.

I don’t want September to roll around and think “I wish I had done/bought/thought of that.”
I'll add, either way (hybrid or remote), your kid will need a dedicated space to do his 'rithmetic. "The experts" recommend a secluded desk, but you know your kid and can make a better decision than the experts can. You can certainly make sure your kid will have a decent laptop, whether school- or parentally-issued. Beef up the wifi, but you can only do so much: if we're all remote, my house will have two teachers and two students all trying to do TeamsZoomMeets simultaneously here. It won't work, of course.

Don't buy a lot of paper. Finally, this covid shit is likely to make schools go paperless. Divest your Dunder-Mifflin stock.
 

Broccoli Iglesias

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Teach the kids real skills. Start with how to reload, cast and how to build an AK.

Have them build you AK while you are working. WIN.

Joking aside ... if you have a kid that is interested in CAD, 3D printing, engineering ... now is probably a great time to get them a small printer, CNC, CAD Software ... they will have plenty of time to play with it and learn.
 

ASHDUMP

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Every state has a 20 page PDF each parent needs to comb thru. MA has one as well which was just communicated to us parents last night. My daughter right now goes to a pre-kindergarten school with about 10 kids. She was so happy to go back and be with other kids and have stuff to do.

Keeping kids at home all day with working parents will not work. And without knowing when this shit will end one parent will likely have to quit their job.
 

HARRYM

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They will be open if they stop paying the teachers.
Damn straight. Want things to open back up, stop taking taxpayer money to pay public employees for their extended paid vacation. Go back to work like the rest of us. Although in my case I have been at work every day since this crap started.
 

allen-1

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Savannah-Chatham County public schools announced last week that they're "going virtual" for the upcoming school year. Bryan County, (where I live), has not made a decision yet. I expect that we'll be doing "elearning" again this year.

Which is a clusterfck for us personally. It means that my wife and I are "schooling" three grandchildren while I work at home. Which means that the burden of schooling them falls on her, and it's exhausting.

Locally they're discussing having the kids in school 2 or 3 days a week so that they can "deep clean" the school in between sessions. Limits of 11 kids per school bus - that won't work - the buses were full last year...

This is a disaster for working parents.
 

Woodsloafer

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They are saying/claiming that even in asymptomatic cases, there is damage to lungs - if this is true and and is substantiated that it is "common" (rather than no health impacts whatsoever to children or in asymptomatic cases for that matter) then I doubt they will be opening.

Palm Beach County’s health department director, Dr. Alina Alonso, warned county commissioners Tuesday about the potential long term health consequences for children who catch COVID-19. She said the virus could cause lifelong damage even for children with mild illnesses.

“They are seeing there is damage to the lungs in these asymptomatic children. ... We don’t know how that is going to manifest a year from now or two years from now,” Alonso said, according to the Sun-Sentinel. “Is that child going to have chronic pulmonary problems or not?”


 

Woodsloafer

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Joking aside ... if you have a kid that is interested in CAD, 3D printing, engineering ... now is probably a great time to get them a small printer, CNC, CAD Software ... they will have plenty of time to play with it and learn.
THIS! Or at least something on this line, if you have children (I do not) do not let them sit around wasting their time texting or whatever, get them learning skills that could really help them, particularly if they find a passion (you know the saying, you'll never work a day if you love what you do). There is so much you can learn without leaving your house, kids/teenagers and even adults should take advantage of any additional time that they have because of the current circumstances. I self-taught myself CAD before there were all these online classes, etc. and it has benefited me greatly.
 
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