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School me on Fat Bikes

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Broccoli Iglesias, Jul 8, 2017.

  1. Supermoto

    Supermoto NES Member

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    Ok back on topic. How many times do you ride during the winter? Are you missing riding days because of the snow? Do you want to ride in 20 degree weather, in the snow at 3mph breaking thru fresh snow?

    Are you planning on selling your FS bike?
     

  2. Broccoli Iglesias

    Broccoli Iglesias NES Member

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    I'm keeping my MTB, for early Spring and late fall.
    I have never really ridden in the snow, it looks like fun, which is why I will rent a few bikes first and I'm looking at which trails are open and so on.

    I hike a lot during winter, usually go to Lafayette and other mountains. So the cold is not an issue.

    The 3mph is the part I haven't thought through.
     
  3. Supermoto

    Supermoto NES Member

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    If the snow is packed, then you can get up to speed. But if its fresh snow, you really are just grinding along. Then some hikers come along and postholes the trail and it really sucks. Occasionally you get a nice 8" ribbon of packed snow that weaves thru the trees on a nice singletrack and everything is awesome, until you get off the 8" ribbon and go over the bars.

    What I really like about fat bikes is the traction on roots and rocks. The tires don't glaces off them like skinnies do. They feel a lot more stable to ride, not twitchy, but some say they feel sluggish.
     
  4. mtnbiker26

    mtnbiker26 NES Member

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    I'm 5'5", 135 pounds and I will literally tear parts off of a bike now and then. Not from crashing, but ripping rear QR wheels out of the dropout, tearing pedal bodies off of the spindle, etc just from so many cycles of pushing/pulling over time. Some pros will shear off handlebars, stems and even steerer tubes under full sprint which is almost 50MPH on flat ground. There is a crapload of power moving through the frame.

    What makes stuff expensive is the combination of strong and light. Your cheap bike is all stamped steel. Nothing straight or round or true, holes are not drilled on center, etc. I won't even test ride a cheap bike because I'm afraid to ride it. Nice stuff is forged or machined aluminum, titanium or carbon fiber. A high end derailleur for example is a couple hundred bucks but it has a forged body, titanium or stainless hardware, a carbon cage and bearings not bushings in the two pulleys, and probably a nickel coating for hardness. It'll last 20,000 miles before it's clapped out and when it's clapped out it'll still shift better than the junk on a brand new dept store bike. Trust me, when you're in a 30MPH pack and you need to smash through a few more gears under load to catch the leader you might actually die if your bike mis-shifts and jams or drops the chain. The good stuff just works with zero hesitation and it goes a long time between service. Some people ride 5 or 10 thousand miles a year and they don't want to service their bike every five minutes.

    As far as the bike mechanic profession goes, there's more to it than you would think. I work on plenty of POS bikes but I also work on $15k bikes pretty regularly. There are plenty of people around who take cycling seriously, race all over the country and pour money into the sport. Don't forget that it's an Olympic event. Someone who has spent years training for high level events and spends an assload of money on bikes, airfare, lodging etc needs someone competent to service their bike so they can have a successful race. Modern mountain bikes have 5 hydraulic systems if you count two brakes, fork, shock and dropper post. Lots of road bikes have electronic shifting now. I can literally plug a DI2 bike into a PC and program shift patterns, shift speed, run diagnostics, update firmware, etc. It's similar to being an auto mechanic. Things change quickly. We fly to manufacturers for technical training or have them come to us. People can get hurt or worse if make a mistake.
     
    2 people like this.
  5. Boris

    Boris Son of Kalashnikov NES Member

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    All the research and yupping won't replace 5 min in the saddle.

    This is where we differ, you prefer to yup and bitch like on old woman and leave man jobs to your personal bicycle mechanic and your milkman.

    Lol, $1600 ... scoot read some reviews, high roller :)

    Sent from my HTCONE using Tapatalk
     
  6. colt_fan

    colt_fan NES Member

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    Sounds like Boris wants to be challenged with doing some service work on a bike because it's not so trivial to do on his own. So perhaps a brake bleed, fork overhaul, bearing replacement and drivetrain replace for the "Son of Kalashnikov", the man that is completely self sufficient.
     
  7. bill o

    bill o

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    I do most of my own work, including wheel building. But when it comes to things like reaming and facing a headtube, or facing and chasing threads on a new BB shell, I go to a good mechanic. I'd rather not buy expensive tools that just rust in my basement never getting used. There's a lot to bike setup that you probably can't appreciate as a more casual cyclist.
     
  8. Boris

    Boris Son of Kalashnikov NES Member

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    You are right, no sarcasm.

    Sent from my HTCONE using Tapatalk
     

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