Record keeping

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My system is a bit out of control.

What record keeping system(s) are you guys in to?

Mark

(I'm using Windows 8...)

Plain text file with internal links to photos (*.jpg)... completely searchable using Windows Search.

With plain text, I am NOT dependent on proprietary file formats.

I've owned pcs since 1982, and I have purged virtually all software that uses proprietary file formats.
 

mac1911

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I use the black and white camo covered note books. One for each call and I also have a few that are gun specific.
I'm blessed so far as most of reloading trials have been short in finding loads that work for my guns.
My notes for hand gun are minimal. I load for pure plinking fun with cast bullets sized to my bores.
Rifle is getting a bit nutty as I now have 6 rifles I'm loading differently for. Also keeping brass sorted for each rifle has added to the fun.
 

The Professor

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I was a simple reloader, a few pistol calibers. Easy to keep track of for me. I now have a renewed interest and ambition with several rifle calibers, shotshell and buck loads as well as several pistol. I'm also gainfully employed and have a lot to do. Tracking brass is a pain for me. Maybe I should just quit work...lol.
 

yogi

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I was a simple reloader, a few pistol calibers. Easy to keep track of for me. I now have a renewed interest and ambition with several rifle calibers, shotshell and buck loads as well as several pistol. I'm also gainfully employed and have a lot to do. Tracking brass is a pain for me. Maybe I should just quit work...lol.

1) Projectiles, powders and primers I mark with unique number (sticker) that links to a notebook (old school paper)
2) In the notebook I write down, supplier, purchase date, price, lot #, mfg. part number for that unique number
3) For brass, it is sorted by # times fired in seperate containers (I tend to keep these in large groups 1,000+...rifle brass is sorted by headstamp)
4) I write all receipes used including components and specific brass in the pages provided in my favorite reloading manual and give them a specific number (eg. reload #10)
5) I put all finished rounds in the same container and mark them with the relaod # I assigned along with caliber and bullet type

When I first started, I thought this was overkill, but when you get going and are using multiple powders, projecticles, various times fired brass and have built up a decent inventory, you really need to keep good records. At least I think you do.
 

Fixxah

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My notebook was done in an ink that apparently disappears when wet. now my pet loads are written on my bench in Sharpie.
 

wolfrage

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For guns?

My Gun Database. Excellent program for collections.

MyGunDB ? Firearm inventory database software for collectors | The best way to manage your firearm collection

Good luck.

OOps, should have looked at the forum section. (I usually just view "new posts)

What are you looking to keep track OF exactly?

Nope, MyGunDB doesn't cover reloading stuff BUT funny enough, I'm actually working on a tab for that right now :D

I'm looking to see what data people want to track for reloading components so I can add it in. Hoping to have it done next week, so any suggestions would be appreciated :D
 
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A simple approach

I've thought a lot about this topic, too, and I'm probably in the same situation as you, maybe not a "simple" reloader, but not a high-volume reloader. I currently reload several pistol calibers: .380, 38 Special, .45 ACP, .44 Magnum; only .223 for rifle; and 12 and 20 gauge shotshell.

There are a couple of things going on here, not just record keeping. You can implement a process for keeping track of brass, as has been suggested. However, it needn't be the same process for everything.

For cartridges that are "loaded up," high velocities, high energy, you should certainly track number of reloads as you might want to retire the brass after a certain number of uses. This you could do by keeping brass in lots, and carrying the lot identifier with the brass, from empty brass containers to the boxes for loaded ammunition, and recording in a notebook the history of that lot.

For light loads, as for pistol plinking or gallery shoots, you can probably ignore the number of times fired, and just examine brass before loading for case length, neck cracks, etc, and discard brass that's "used up."

There's a lot to be said for a single, paper notebook, a Composition Book. I use the front as a journal, i.e., literally, recording things I've done, batches I've loaded, materials I've purchased, etc., in chronological order: date, what, etc. From the back I put "sticky" information, load data, i.e., my load recipes. You can even open the notebook to the middle, where the stitching is, and start recording other types of data going forward and back in the notebook, like perhaps your materials inventory, etc. A low-volume reloader will probably never fill up he one book.

I use online stuff, too, but the notebook is tough to beat.

Just my 2¢.

M
 

The Professor

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Thanks for that. I guess that this is really all I'm doing now. Seemed like it was working OK too but thought some guys may have some other ideas. Wouldn't object to having a computer program as a tracking system for comp., precision shooting either.

Mark
 
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