Rangefinding Binoculars ?

Realtor MA

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Is it worth getting a good pair of rangefinding binoculars for hunting, hiking and other cool stuff? Or is it better to get a separate rangefinder and a good pair of binoculars?
I think I'm leaning toward the built-in range finder but curious what you all have to say.
 

Mark from MA

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I prefer separate. If i break or lose one, I still have the other. Rangefinders do not need be high end either from what I've found out, so you would save money buying induvidually.

Plus I don't even take glass on my bowhunts, the deer has to be within 35 yards to kill it, so I really could care less whats beyond that. If its a big buck at a long distance, I'll know because if you see the antlers at a distance prominently....buck is big. And messing around trying to look at too distant objects can get you busted.
 
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Rifle hunting I think it’s an advantage especially if it has a Ballistic calculator, I would only look at Leica Zeiss and Swaro if I was going to get some. One thing to remember most high end range finder binos have a hard time picking up inside of 50 yards so definitely not the best for archery but if I was western elk/deer hunting It would be a big advantage for sure
 

Katana88

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So, as usual, it depends. I have Zeiss bino rangefinders. Great glass, good for finding your target, then quickly pushing a button and checking range. Depending on how far away and how small the target, you may need to steady the binos on something, like a bag or tree. I've found tree branches and the like often result in erroneous measurements, so you need to check multiple times, just to verify the correct distance, both in front of and behind the intended target.

If you are not in a rush and have plenty of time, separate standalone binoculars and a monocular rangefinder may be superior, as you would presumably have a higher quality rangefinder that has a smaller beam and does a better job ignoring brush or branches that may be in the way. The downside is that the little monocular rangefinders are not as good for observing, so most use binoculars for glassing, then switch to the rangefinder, which can take considerably more time.

I'm happy with my Zeiss binoculars, but I sometimes think about adding a small, dedicated rangefinder to the bag, just so I can verify the numbers I am seeing from the Zeiss.
 

Tackdriver

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I have a pair of Leica that does both. Prior I had carried both separately and found it was a pain, especially in instances when seconds mattered.

Something I find myself doing now is getting to a spot and ranging out which trees or Boulder is at the end range of my bullet’s trajectory. This way I can minimize needing to range things in a hurry. I just determine that from my position out to the tree at X yards is within the kill zone. In that situation having one of each would be ok, but I’d still have to carry two pieces of gear around.

Dave
 

Realtor MA

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I've been spending money like a mad man but I'm thinking I can deal with dropping some more cash for either the nikon at $1200 or the Leica at $1600
 
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