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Questions about the National Match program history,why and when?

Discussion in 'Mil Surp Collectors' started by mac1911, Mar 3, 2019.

  1. mac1911

    mac1911 NES Member

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    Since the Military is the main reason we have the National Matches and the Branches had thier own NM Armorers Plus The Arms Depots doing the work also. I have some Questions and hope to find some answers.

    1. Why is the NM front sight post size .062" ? At what point and why was this size chosen?
    2. When did the 800-1000 yard course of fire get dropped from the Matches for Service Rifle
     

  2. Mountain

    Mountain NES Member

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    Probably one of the grumpy old farts on M14 or CMP forum will know.
     
  3. PatMcD

    PatMcD NES Member

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    1. You must be referring to the M1/M14 front sight? I'd guess that width is optimized to the long sight radius of the platform. Back in the stone age, they thought the front post should be about the same width as the sighting black. Today, conventional thinking is that wider is better. Before i dropped irons on the AR, I used a .072.
    2. Sometime in the 60's wasn't it?
     
  4. mac1911

    mac1911 NES Member

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    Hmm, I will assume the SR target was the same back then ?
     
  5. PatMcD

    PatMcD NES Member

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    An excerpt from Hap Rocketto's "A Short History of United States target Development and Evolution":

    The new target used the Minute of Angle (MOA) as its base of measurement. A MOA is a unit of angular measurement equal to 1/60th of a degree. At one hundred yards, a minute of angle subtends 1.047 inches. Shooters commonly round this distance to one inch, calling it "one minute,", and use it as the standard for measuring the accuracy of a firearm. The quest for the Holy Grail of shooting, a rifle and ammunition combination that will shoot a group of less than one minute, seems never ending.

    Rounding the MOA to one inch makes it easy to calculate the necessary adjustments to the sights at the various distances commonly used in outdoor competitive shooting, 50 through 1,000 yards. A MOA is equal to the distance in yards divided by 100, i.e. one MOA at 100 yards is one inch, at 200 yards it is two inches and so forth. Sights are calibrated so that a given number of "clicks" will move the strike of the bullet one minute.

    The SR target, with its six scoring rings, three inch X through 37 inch five ring, made its first appearance in competition in 1967. As originally designed the SR target had a 13 inch/6.5 minute MOA aiming black, X through nine ring, at 200 yards but it was also used for 300 yard rapid fire where it had a four MOA aiming black. The MR1 target, MR stands for Mid Range, used at 600 yards, had an aiming black of 24 inches/four MOA from the X through eight ring.

    About 1980 it was determined that the aiming black at 300 and 600 yards was too small. In response, the SR target's aiming black was expanded to the eight ring for, creating a new target for 300 yards-the SR3. The MR1's black was expanded to cover the X ring to the seven ring. These revisions made the target easier to see and brought the three targets used in National Match competition into alignment, each having a nominal six MOA aiming black.

    The 1,000 yard 5V target "C" eventually went the way of the "A" and "B" as a domestic competition target in 1974. It was replaced by the NRA Experimental 1000 yard target center which debuted in the 1975 Leech and Wimbledon matches. However, the 5V is not gone nor forgotten. It has stubbornly hung on and can be found at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot ranges at San Diego and Parris Island where it is used in primary marksmanship training and qualification. It is also one of the official targets for competition sponsored by the International Confederation of Fullbore Rifle Associations
     
  6. mac1911

    mac1911 NES Member

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    Cool , nice stuff
     
  7. smokey-seven

    smokey-seven NES Member

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    It's been a long time since I shot longer ranges. That said, someone will correct me if my memory is off.

    22 targets at 50 feet, the front sight would cover the width of the target and you balanced the target at the top of the sight, held on the base of the black.

    The sight picture on military weapons at 600 yards is the same as the 22. The black is bigger but the picture is the same. See pic below

    [​IMG]
     

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