packable shovel

peterk123

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What are you guys using for a packable shovel? I need something that packs away easily but can get the job done. I stumbled across a hickoy plant today and had to dig a hole over a foot deep with my folding knife to get the freakin' roots. Trying my hand at Hickory coffee. Roasting the roots as I write.

Now I have to go and sharpen my knife :)

BTW, anyone every try hickory coffee?
 
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What are you guys using for a packable shovel? I need something that packs away easily but can get the job done. I stumbled across a hickoy plant today and had to dig a hole over a foot deep with my folding knife to get the freakin' roots. Trying my hand at Hickory coffee. Roasting the roots as I write.

Now I have to go and sharpen my knife :)

BTW, anyone every try hickory coffee?
Useful for burying human waste while out and about. It might be too small for your use..

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View: https://www.amazon.com/Ymeibe-Lightweight-Stainless-Backpacking-Multipurpose/dp/B0899G5VDP/ref=asc_df_B0899G5VDP/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=459411117297&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=13878126788419520897&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1021851&hvtargid=pla-974780408764&psc=1
 

peterk123

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ReluctantDecoy

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Aside from that 1' hole, what are the expectations of this shovel? Only reason I ask is because you don't want to give yourself a heart attack trying to do serious digging with a foldable shovel just to have it be a foldable shovel. If light duty, then go for it. If serious snow or soil, then get a solid shovel and toss it in the trunk.
 

440beeper

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Milsurp Entrenching Tool is what you need. Those things are tough. It's small and comes in its own carrier.
 

1776

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Aside from that 1' hole, what are the expectations of this shovel? Only reason I ask is because you don't want to give yourself a heart attack trying to do serious digging with a foldable shovel just to have it be a foldable shovel. If light duty, then go for it. If serious snow or soil, then get a solid shovel and toss it in the trunk.
It should also be Mother-In-Law capable, along with the size of the trunk [wink]
 

peterk123

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Aside from that 1' hole, what are the expectations of this shovel? Only reason I ask is because you don't want to give yourself a heart attack trying to do serious digging with a foldable shovel just to have it be a foldable shovel. If light duty, then go for it. If serious snow or soil, then get a solid shovel and toss it in the trunk.
Hiking, backpacking, and car camping. I have back country skiing avalanche shovel in the truck for snow.
 

chris_1001

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I keep an telescoping avalanche shovel in the car in winter.

I have a CS spetsnaz shovel at home. I used to keep in the trunk of my old car. I’ll put it back in my car tomorrow... you never know when you have to call 811
 

Picton

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There are a million different designs of military e-tool from various countries, all of them specifically designed to do exactly what you're looking for. They all work, pretty much. I use the folding 1990s-era USGI one I got used to in the army, and it's never let me down; if it ever does, they're cheap and I'd buy a new one.

Bonus: you can configure it in such a way that you can perch a cheek on it when you're "downloading class 1" over the hole you just dug.

Report on your hickory roots? That sounds really interesting.
 

Andy in NH

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If you are going to use the USGI E-Tool, be sure to replace the bolt where the spade pivots with a Grade 8 bolt.
The OEM bolt has failed on several occasions, especially in the chopping mode where the spade is 90* to the shaft/handle.
 

cams

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There are a million different designs of military e-tool from various countries, all of them specifically designed to do exactly what you're looking for. They all work, pretty much. I use the folding 1990s-era USGI one I got used to in the army, and it's never let me down; if it ever does, they're cheap and I'd buy a new one.

Bonus: you can configure it in such a way that you can perch a cheek on it when you're "downloading class 1" over the hole you just dug.

Report on your hickory roots? That sounds really interesting.
Absolutely. Works well. Can also drive the head into the ground and configure it so the triangle handle holds a canteen cup over a small fire for some morning joe and some hot chow. It blackens the handle some but wipes off mostly with regular cleaning.
 
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garandman

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+1...sharp as a blade...it'll cut down a tree...and I keep mine under the rear seat of my pickup, just in case...."for digging" of course... :cool:
The Ames USGI eTool will easily cut down a tree. It’s what we used to cut camouflage for our tanks and APC’s. It was also difficult to give soldiers defensive training with them because we’d cut up or break all the training aids in short order. Only the rubber bayonet dummies stood up to them.

We have one in every car and both snowmobiles.
 

peterk123

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Report on your hickory roots? That sounds really interesting.
We had it this morning, mixed with 50/50 coffee. Tasted like a slightly milder coffee without being watery. I am going to try find some more and do a 100% blend. Supposed to have all sorts of medicinal/anti-inflammatory uses. I recently picked up a book on medicinal plants, so now I am always walking around seeing what is out there that I can eat. Not sure why I am doing it, but I am fascinated with the idea of being able to find things around me that are edible. Gives me a different view of the places a hike all the time.
 

ReluctantDecoy

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Hiking, backpacking, and car camping. I have back country skiing avalanche shovel in the truck for snow.
I think the smallest I'd go for most applications where I'm not carrying the shovel for extended periods of time is this one (usa made too):


Fixed construction. Basic, universal shape, and a nice D handle. Small enough to hike to a camp site without it being too much of a walking obstruction on a pack, but not so small you're breaking your back to do some real digging.

But if you're carrying it around on an extended hike, then size and weight do matter and this would no longer be appropriate. I suppose there, you'd sacrifice ease of use for portability, and most of these folding jobs would work. I'd still want a D handle though. Just a personal preference. Probably want it under a kilo at the most too.
 

AHM

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While the hikers/skiers avalanche shovels are light and compact,
I don't trust the plastic blade on mine. Someone borrowed ours to help
free us from a snowbank we slid into, and I was shocked that they
didn't snap the blade right off. It's fine for powder, or beach sand.
But snow that's been compacted by either setting or impact
is too stiff for plastic. And of course dirt, gravel or talus is a non-starter.

Packing an entrenching tool on a multi-thousand foot high mountain day hike
"just in case I need to dig a hole" is wicked insane overkill. But carrying a
folding avalanche shovel is mostly Teh Fail, too, because you get some of
the weight, plus it won't work.
 
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