Overhead Wires Question

Cut or call


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Jarcese

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I've been zapped more times than I can remember with 120. More like a slightly painful tickle.
I got hit in one arm with 240 once from a frayed wire touching a metal frame. My upper arm touched the frame and my hand went to ground...
240 is no f***ing joke man. My arm hurt for a week. If I reached out with the other arm the voltage would have crossed my chest and I'd probably be dead, I was,alone an nobody was around.
Messed up thing was that the equipment power was dead, but there was a separate control box hooked up to it on a different breaker, that had the frayed wire.
I wouldn't touch 240 unless I knew it is dead for sure.
No offense, but that would be 120v. Most people that say they were shocked by 240 are mistaken. It's actually pretty hard to get 240v across a body part unless you put your hand across a bussbar or something equally stupid. Any shock to ground with house voltage would be 120, even if it is a 240 circuit. Amperage is the bigger factor. One circuit with no load and a 120 shock will probably hurt a little. A heavily loaded circuit one breaker over could give you shock that could kill you. Sorry for the sidetrack, but it is an electrical thread...
 

Spanz

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No offense, but that would be 120v. Most people that say they were shocked by 240 are mistaken. It's actually pretty hard to get 240v across a body part unless you put your hand across a bussbar or something equally stupid. Any shock to ground with house voltage would be 120, even if it is a 240 circuit. Amperage is the bigger factor. One circuit with no load and a 120 shock will probably hurt a little. A heavily loaded circuit one breaker over could give you shock that could kill you. Sorry for the sidetrack, but it is an electrical thread...
either hot leg, if shorted to ground would give you a 120V shock.

In my case, it was a 20 amp 240V heater circuit. My diagonal cutters went across both hot legs...causing a light show
 

Jarcese

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either hot leg, if shorted to ground would give you a 120V shock.

In my case, it was a 20 amp 240V heater circuit. My diagonal cutters went across both hot legs...causing a light show
Gotcha. Proves my point though that it's very hard to get shocked with 240, blowing tools up is another story. I've seen some spectacular explosions in person. Can't say I have not done it myself. The trick is to throw the tools away so there is no evidence.
 

Asaltweapon

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Funny story.

I'm taking a house down for a large project and the electric company is naturally jerking me around. Meter socket and a service disconnect for the 600 amp service is at the far end of where we start crushing the house working our way into the corner where the service comes in and still no N Star so we carefully peal away everything around it and start loading it up into trailers.
We cut a hunk of the rubber roof and start nailing it to the sill over the service when the brand new building inspector shows up to look around and asks me what's with the rubber being nailed up to that corner. That's when I tell him N Star was jerking me around on dropping the feed so eff them, the house has to go and the rubber will keep any rain out till they get here. He calls me a crazy bastard and says you can't do that!! My reply was it's too late now... its done!!! He laughs and says I guess you're right.

We became very good friends at that point. Too many laughs to count.
 

snax

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No offense, but that would be 120v. Most people that say they were shocked by 240 are mistaken. It's actually pretty hard to get 240v across a body part unless you put your hand across a bussbar or something equally stupid. Any shock to ground with house voltage would be 120, even if it is a 240 circuit. Amperage is the bigger factor. One circuit with no load and a 120 shock will probably hurt a little. A heavily loaded circuit one breaker over could give you shock that could kill you. Sorry for the sidetrack, but it is an electrical thread...
I assure you, it was 220/240. Tanning bed. Commercial 208v boosted to 240. Wall control units had 240 going to them on a single hot leg. Beds have 2 hots @120 neutral and ground. The bed chassis was reading 237v when I tested it. No idea at the time those control timers ran at 220/240.
Hot wire coming back from the timer control passed thru a metal hole on the bed without any grommet or strain relief. Frayed jacket in the hole.
Made in europe.
Edit.... worked on many tanning beds, I'm surprised there aren't any fires. All I've seen have been hack jobs.
Edit 2- I knew it was 240 as soon as I got zapped. I had never felt that kind of pain. Like I said, it hurt for a week. My arm was sore and weak. Probably should have went to a doctor.
 
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Spanz

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That is not so in all locations, some do, some don't.

Many places, you as the home owner must provide the correct size service drop wires according to the size of service going in and have them installed by an electrician from house to pole and the power company makes the connection at the drop transformer when an inspection certificate is presented to them from the electrical inspector so they know they aren't hooking up to a dead short circuit in the customer's home or building.

Once they make the connection, then the power company places the meter on the meter box and seals it with a seal on the ring that holds the meter in place.
I just did this with a buried line in ma
Electrician ran plastic conduit up to pole, and up side of house to a box. Building inspector makes sure he likes it all (ground rods outside, ground connection inside, fill around buried conduit). Inspector calls national grid to do the connection

New stuff i did not expect, like expansion joints

5EAA1DEC-B704-40D3-B367-6AD8763694D0.jpeg

And metal conduit part way up the pole. Metal conduit needs to be earth grounded
 
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quincy

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I got 5kv from elbow to leg from a lab experiment. Luckily not much current but it was painful. Got thrown across a room after coming in contact with a 50kv magneto. It felt like I was hit in the shoulder with a wrecking ball. Then I got my BSEE. Now I’m still stupid. ⚡⚡⚡
 

HorizontalHunter

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When NiMo did the demo at the Cobleskill Fair,
they had a plywood silhouette of Mr. Squirrel edged with band iron.

They'd clip in to a screw eye mounted in the center of the wood
and use it to show what happened when Mr. Squirrel stepped on two phases at once.

Very noisy.


Otherwise when they send you the monthly electric bill,
you could blow it off with
"I heard that your responsibility ends at the pole,
so I bypassed the meter months ago".


Damn; you're lucky you got out alive after touching those things.




We call them duplex outlets, but whatever.


Yeah, and it can make funny noises.
Sounds like a hot dog in the microwave.

Bob
 
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HorizontalHunter

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I got 5kv from elbow to leg from a lab experiment. Luckily not much current but it was painful. Got thrown across a room after coming in contact with a 50kv magneto. It felt like I was hit in the shoulder with a wrecking ball. Then I got my BSEE. Now I’m still stupid. ⚡⚡⚡
We used a hand crank “megger” to check antenna impedance when I was in the service. Oh the fun we had with that.

Bob
 

mwalsh9152

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I got 5kv from elbow to leg from a lab experiment. Luckily not much current but it was painful. Got thrown across a room after coming in contact with a 50kv magneto. It felt like I was hit in the shoulder with a wrecking ball. Then I got my BSEE. Now I’m still stupid. ⚡⚡⚡
I took 350VDC across the chest once. Only time I've ever really scared myself with a shock. My shoulders hurt for days after that one.
 

42!

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I got 5kv from elbow to leg from a lab experiment. Luckily not much current but it was painful. Got thrown across a room after coming in contact with a 50kv magneto. It felt like I was hit in the shoulder with a wrecking ball. Then I got my BSEE. Now I’m still stupid. ⚡⚡⚡
It's not the volts that kill, I've been bit many times by an HEI ignition coil, 40Kv and I'm still here.....of course there is that odd glow at night.
 

quincy

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We used a hand crank “megger” to check antenna impedance when I was in the service. Oh the fun we had with that.

Bob
I once was trying to tune a telescopic antenna connected to the back of my Drake 2NT CW transmitter while holding the antenna with one hand and holding key down with the other. That didn’t last long. 75 watts of RF at 21 MHz.
 

falcon123

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How old is that wire? If the insulation on the wire is intact you will be fine.

Electricity is always looking for the shortest path to the ground. If the branch is charged and you ground it you will get poked. Less if the pole is fiberglass, more if it's wood. And it's not volts that kill you, it's amps.
I don't think that is correct. I think the purpose of the insulation is to prevent corrosion of the wires not to insulate. That's why people still get electrocuted.

The vast majority of outside power lines have no insulation. Sometimes there is a thin weather coating but it is not enough to protect from shocks. Since the lines are battered by seasonal conditions, it is uncertain what shape they are in. The safest approach is to never touch power lines.
Why Are Overhead Power Lines So Dangerous? - Sigalarm
 

Uzi2

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I once was trying to tune a telescopic antenna connected to the back of my Drake 2NT CW transmitter while holding the antenna with one hand and holding key down with the other. That didn’t last long. 75 watts of RF at 21 MHz.
RF is a whole different thing from 60hz AC.

RF burns deep into tisue and takes many months for the wound to heal. It also destroys nerves and nerve endings.
 

new guy

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It’s only a matter of time before he starts a thread looking for medical advice.
 

Spanz

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He took life or death advise from an internet forum. His name was Tuna:emoji_disappointed_relieved:, may god rest his soul.
I understand. In death, a member of project NES has a name. His name is Tuna

His name is Tuna!

His name is TUNA!!!
 

Spanz

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He took life or death advise from an internet forum. His name was Tuna:emoji_disappointed_relieved:, may god rest his soul.
I understand. In death, a member of project NES has a name. His name is Tuna

His name is Tuna.
 
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