Oscillating Tool Recommendation

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I bought the dremel one when we did the flooring in this house. The sanding attachment, with diamond sanding paper. Fixed some uneven concrete as well. for a job like reflooring the whole house, I’m glad it is corded, as waiting for batteries to charge would suck.
 

Mark from MA

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I have Ridgid cordless and have the Ridgid oscillating tool. Used it for flush cutting door jambs on a hardwood install. It cuts shims and gets into some tight areas. Love it.
 
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If you are only doing one project ,this works more than fine, and cheaper too.
Only for some jobs. If you need a short plunge cut that's not going to cut it. For example....

Ever see a door frame where the part the lock latches into is all crapped out? It's straightforward to cut out a rectangular section, insert a tight fitting plug cut to the side of the square opening (use wood glue); then use the sander attachment on the vibrating tool to even the plug with the rest of the frame. One painted it's invisible unless you look for it, and you can make a new cutout for the latch in fresh wood.
 

PatMcD

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I use one pretty much daily.
The first one I bought was a corded Rigid. Lasted about a year. Junk.
The second corded one was a Makita. Better tool; still works great.
But, it never gets used now because the only one I use is my Milwaukee 18v. I can't stand cords anymore.

I'd buy a decent one if I were the OP, even if you think it's only a one-time-use type of tool. You'll find many uses for it.
 

W.E.C

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Only for some jobs. If you need a short plunge cut that's not going to cut it. For example....

Ever see a door frame where the part the lock latches into is all crapped out? It's straightforward to cut out a rectangular section, insert a tight fitting plug cut to the side of the square opening (use wood glue); then use the sander attachment on the vibrating tool to even the plug with the rest of the frame. One painted it's invisible unless you look for it, and you can make a new cutout for the latch in fresh wood.
I’ve made some sawdust in my journeys. And doors and windows from scratch.F87BAED2-B5F1-4A5F-98E2-DBF763631A75.jpeg
 

cockpitbob

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...Very useful tool to have!

Good luck
10 years ago I asked a contractor who does a lot of interior work how much he used his. He said it's usually the first tool off the truck at a new job. I went right out and bought a Dremel one. I don't have anything to compare it to, but it's been good.
 

W.E.C

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10 years ago I asked a contractor who does a lot of interior work how much he used his. He said it's usually the first tool off the truck at a new job. I went right out and bought a Dremel one. I don't have anything to compare it to, but it's been good.
Yep, my roto zip and flush cut kit is out now. :)
BBC4ED5C-8BB0-4D5D-8239-8B9C1055D096.jpeg
 

gerrycaruso

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I use a Fein because I use it a lot. I think that the expensive tools are smoother than the cheap ones. If you only need to use it once, consider renting one.
 

1903Collector

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They all do the same thing. It’s the f***ing blades that will cost you 10x more than the tool over time. Sound familiar?
This, this, this!!!!!!
I use this tool a lot, I have a Bosch, Rockwell, and Porter Cable. I like the Rockwell the best and I'm a Bosch fanboy. These tools are fantastic for putting in old work boxes especially on paneled walls.
 

mousegunfan

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Fein is the best. I have one and also the roto zip orbital tool. Fein is head and shoulders better. Fein is expensive though.
 
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Thanks for all the replies! Between your recommendations and a few online reviews, I decided yesterday to get the Dremel MM50 tool from Amazon and it just arrived a few minutes ago. I've never bought any power tools from HF and decided I wouldn't start now. I thought the price of $115.88 was reasonable, probably middle of the pack between consumer and Pro versions. It has a 2 year warranty, and, with any luck, it will last much longer than that considering the limited use I will probably give it.
 

PatMcD

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Fein is the best. I have one and also the roto zip orbital tool. Fein is head and shoulders better. Fein is expensive though.
Fein was the first, but I don't see how they're the best. They're no worse than others, but "head and shoulders better"? I don't see it.
 

Spanz

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I have the Dremel one and it's a huge POS... All I can recommend is that you NOT get that one. I'll be looking to replace it the net time I hiah ve a job on the radar that calls for it.
i have a dremel corded, a HF, corded and a Makita battery one. Dremel is one step above HF, but more like a hobbyist tool than and actual carpentry tool. If you have some delicate work, the dremel is fine. If you are cutting thru bolts embedded in wood....dremel is not gonna cut it.
 

Dench

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i have a dremel corded, a HF, corded and a Makita battery one. Dremel is one step above HF, but more like a hobbyist tool than and actual carpentry tool. If you have some delicate work, the dremel is fine. If you are cutting thru bolts embedded in wood....dremel is not gonna cut it.
Why would you use an oscillating saw to cut through bolts in wood? And if you did, isnt a problem relating to cutting that more reliant on a blade?
 

ront02769

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Unless you are a carpenter, etc. it is not a tool that you will use every day.....but it IS one of those that when you need it, nothing else will do. Kind of like a hammer drill. Ive been using a Rigid for maybe ten years, couple or three times a month, and it is just fine. It if you’re in a group project deal, be sure to ask for someone ELSE‘ S oscillating deal.....because someone else won’t think twice about cutting a nail with your $8 blade!
 

Spanz

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Why would you use an oscillating saw to cut through bolts in wood? And if you did, isnt a problem relating to cutting that more reliant on a blade?
I don’t know how you use one, but one thing i had to do last summer was cut thru hard cut nails holding some 80 year old clapboards. Needed a carbide blade, and a heavy enough tool so it did not vibrate too much, and do an inefficient cut. Hence the Makita

The HF was moving around in my hand, and all i did was heat up the cut nails
 

Dench

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I don’t know how you use one, but one thing i had to do last summer was cut thru hard cut nails holding some 80 year old clapboards. Needed a carbide blade, and a heavy enough tool so it did not vibrate too much, and do an inefficient cut. Hence the Makita

The HF was moving around in my hand, and all i did was heat up the cut nails
Harbor freight bring crap is not unexpected. That said dremel is a better product than most of HFs items.

My dremel oscillator can cut nails no problem as long as the blade is reasonable
 

Spanz

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Harbor freight bring crap is not unexpected. That said dremel is a better product than most of HFs items.

My dremel oscillator can cut nails no problem as long as the blade is reasonable
My dremel is too light, as in not being massive enough for tough cuts
 

Spanz

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Harbor freight bring crap is not unexpected. That said dremel is a better product than most of HFs items.

My dremel oscillator can cut nails no problem as long as the blade is reasonable
You misunderstand. A “cut nail” is a hardened steel nail they used back in the day, normally only used in hardwood flooring. A hacksaw will not work on a “cut nail”, it is too hard a steel
 
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Why would you use an oscillating saw to cut through bolts in wood? And if you did, isnt a problem relating to cutting that more reliant on a blade?
I had to do just that. Could not get the sawsall in the space and the oscillating blade was not deep enough to damage the wall on the far side.
You do need the right blades for the job.
 

Dench

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I had to do just that. Could not get the sawsall in the space and the oscillating blade was not deep enough to damage the wall on the far side.
You do need the right blades for the job.
If I had to I'd just buy an expensive blade. otherwise use a sawzall or grinder depending on how insane the cut was. The oscillators are sorta finish tools, sorta not that are occasional jack of all trades. But it's the last tool I'd use for super hard cuts unless there was a high amount of precision needed.
 
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