NH Gives Cop Killer Death sentence

doobie

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Good. I hope it comes quickly so we don't have to pay for his sorry little bunk arse. Of course if it isn't before 1/20, Obama will probably pardon him.
 
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I remember this story, glad to hear that justice will be served.


The defense admitted on the first day of the trial that Addison killed Briggs, but said the act was reckless, not intentional.

"It was fast and it was totally unplanned," defense attorney David Rothstein said in his opening statement. "It was a reckless act that ended in a terrible tragedy."
What did he think shooting at another person was going to do? Much less an officer trying to apprehend you?
 

doobie

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And also make the law such that anyone convicted of murder should be executed.
 
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Since NH hasn't put anyone to death since 1939, I doubt you will see this one anytime soon. Especially because the granite state didn't fortify it's southern border soon enough and too many of us Ma**h***s escaped from the reservation.
 
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Good. I hope it comes quickly so we don't have to pay for his sorry little bunk arse. Of course if it isn't before 1/20, Obama will probably pardon him.
What? You don't like the idea of putting him in a box and telling him for the next decade that he is never ever going to get out alive. Then occasionally give him some hope by letting people come in and tell him that they think they can win it on appeal, only to get let down, only to repeat that tease another 15 or 20 times.

I don't really see that the death itself as the whole punishment, but the final moment. It is the culmination of decades of state induced grinding on the perpetrator's psychological instinct to survive.
 

Nashmack

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IIRC the only approved method of termination in NH is hanging, and the state doesn't have a death chamber.

Group buy on rope anyone?
 
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Maybe the same process will infect MA as well but let's expand it to convicted murderer's in general rather than just for those that kill a cop.
 
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Was sentenced to death by Lethal Injection if I remember the article correctly.
Yeah, hopefully in a cell with a big gorilla sized guy with AIDS. Let him be "Bubba's Wife" for a couple of years, until the AIDS starts working. That's the kind of "Lethal Injection" this kind deserves.
 

doobie

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What? You don't like the idea of putting him in a box and telling him for the next decade that he is never ever going to get out alive. Then occasionally give him some hope by letting people come in and tell him that they think they can win it on appeal, only to get let down, only to repeat that tease another 15 or 20 times.

I don't really see that the death itself as the whole punishment, but the final moment. It is the culmination of decades of state induced grinding on the perpetrator's psychological instinct to survive.
Sure I have no problem with them put in a box. I just don't want to be supporting them in a box. Build a building once that they can't get out of. Give them the basic supplies they need to survive and make them survive. If they are truely guilty of their crime and they die cuz they couldn't survive, then c'est la vie.
 
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Very occasionally, there is someone who was truly innocent who does get put on death row. The appeals process is an ugly but necessary ordeal.
 

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Very occasionally, there is someone who was truly innocent who does get put on death row. The appeals process is an ugly but necessary ordeal.
But that's not the case here. He admitted to the killing, so why should there be a delay in carrying out the sentence? In China, they take you out and shoot you within 5 minutes of the conviction. End of story.
No more taxpayer money spent on keeping the scumbag alive.
The part that really pisses me off is that this a**h*** will probably be treated like royalty by the other inmates because he's a cop killer. [frown]
 
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Very occasionally, there is someone who was truly innocent who does get put on death row. The appeals process is an ugly but necessary ordeal.
While this is true, it is less common than in the past. In this particular case, the BG confessed to the killing, and therefore IMO has no grounds for appeal.

In a case where a not guilty plea is entered, I think that conclusive DNA evidence should be present in order to issue a death sentence. If that evidence is present then again, no appeal seems warranted.

With regard to how they do it in China, well...
 
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But that's not the case here. He admitted to the killing, so why should there be a delay in carrying out the sentence? In China, they take you out and shoot you within 5 minutes of the conviction. End of story.
No more taxpayer money spent on keeping the scumbag alive.
The part that really pisses me off is that this a**h*** will probably be treated like royalty by the other inmates because he's a cop killer. [frown]
That's true. I was speaking generally.
 
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In this case the individual should have the death sentence carried out promptly. All evidence pointed to guilt. Unfortunately due to the 'system', this will not occur for some time if at all. He will languish in a small cell, 23 hours a day(with one hour in the yard alone and two showers a week), 7 days a week, for years while appeals go on. Rather than focus on the guys three squares and a roof over his head, we should look at what else is in store for him. The only thing we can have solace in if any is that the individual contracts death row syndrome. This is where protracted periods in death row make inmates suicidal, delusional, and insane. The concept of bleak isolation can be an exquisite form of torture in itself. Then again we can still hope after many years of this, the sentence is finally carried out. Poetic justice.
 
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Addison trial tab: $2.7 million and rising

http://www.unionleader.com/article.aspx?headline=Addison+trial+tab%3a+%242.7+million+and+rising&articleId=f7f5bff4-6a0a-4a49-b10f-72b94be47027

CONCORD – New Hampshire has spent about $2.7 million on the trial and sentencing phase of Michael Addison, the state's lone death row inmate.

It spent an additional $2.4 million prosecuting the capital murder case against John Brooks, convicted and sentenced to life without parole in his murder-for-hire trial for killing a handyman against whom he held a grudge.

Addison was convicted and sentenced to execution last December for the 2006 murder of Manchester Police Officer Michael Briggs.

Death penalty laws in New Hampshire allow juries to apply capital punishment for specific crimes: killings of law enforcement officer, including judges and prison guards; murder during rape, kidnapping or drug deals; murder for hire; and murder committed by someone already serving life without parole.

A special commission studying the state's death penalty laws heard yesterday that prosecutors in the Addison case ran up a $1.6 million bill and public defenders spent $1.1 million. Costs include forensics testing, expert witnesses, staff and attorney time and other items, Deputy Attorney General Orville "Bud" Fitch told the commission.

Christopher Keating, executive director of the New Hampshire Public Defender Program, said he expects the early appeals phase to cost nearly $400,000 this fiscal year, which ends June 30, 2010, and $408,000 in fiscal 2011. One expert testified that appeals now last an average of 13 years.

The law that set up the commission asked it to review all aspects of the state's capital murder law, including how equitably it is applied, its costs and its deterrent effect.

New Hampshire's death penalty laws are more narrowly drawn than those in most states, according to Richard Dieter, executive director of the Death Penalty Information Center in Washington, D.C.

He described as "a common misperception" the belief that a death sentence is cheaper than a life without parole. The U.S. Supreme Court requires more care and deliberation when a defendant faces death, he said.

"It has told us that death is different," Dieter said. "Every step will take longer, be more complicated and more costly. They require more experienced judges, more experienced legal staff, more time with jurors and more appeals steps."

Over the last 20 years, 68 percent, or more than two of three death sentences, have been overturned on appeal, he said.

Even those death penalty cases that end in plea bargains cost three times as much -- $192,300 compared with $55,772 -- as the cases where execution is not a consideration, he said.

Prison costs are, on average, double for death row inmates because they are isolated and treated to higher levels of security, he said.

Assistant Corrections Commissioner William McGonagle said Addison is held in a single maximum-security cell. McGonagle said the department does not break down inmate costs by levels of security in which they are held. On average, he said, the state spends $33,100 on each inmate.

He said there are no firm plans to build an execution unit, although a master plan proposed a $1.7 million station for that purpose.

He said the department has met with other states in advance of drafting administrative rules for handling an execution. Among the unanswered questions is who would administer a lethal injection. McGonagle said the department assumes doctors, nurses and other health care professionals would not take the job.
 
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But it only costs about 4 bucks for a well placed .50 BMG round.
That scumbag should already be down for a dirt nap.
 
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There is one HUGE problem with the logic of those that tout appeal costs of a death sentence compared to the cost of housing a person for life.

All of the "facts" that I see compare the costs of housing a prson for life versus the cost of appeals, including appeals cost on BOTH sides for a death row inmate. Considering many life convicted inmates spend decades appealing their own sentences and also suing the state, corrections and everyone else over percieved violation of civil rights a big cost of housing a lifer is ignored. Look at the case of the police officer shot in northern Worcester county a few years ago. The shooter was a DOC inmate out getting internships and an education on the DOC dime while continually suing the department and using the suits as leverage to get classification changes at his whim.

Problem to me is a system built that allows inmates to sue over everything, ignoring procedural mandates that the other side has to abide by because they start the suit themselves and are given wide latitude by judges. THEN they are assigned counsel by a judge and the state pays for basically suing itself.

Considering the old "if this million dollar expenditure saves ONE childs life it was worth it" sort of line we hear continually, the cost of putting a person to death should just be considered the cost of doing business. It should not be used as an excuse to get rid of the death penalty for financial reasons.

Plus, how many times have you actually heard of a person dying in prison after a life sentence?
 
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