New to Clays

Rating - 0%
0   0   0
Joined
Mar 5, 2012
Messages
246
Likes
5
Location
South Shore
Hey All,
I just bought a used over/under for sporting clays, which i'm addicted to now. My question is, what type of lubricant should I use for my o/u? I keep hearing grease is better suited than oil for shotguns. What brand of grease do you use and highly recommend?

Thanks!
 

icyclefar

NES Member
Rating - 100%
44   0   0
Joined
Jun 12, 2006
Messages
5,195
Likes
764
Location
South Shore
Hey All,
I just bought a used over/under for sporting clays, which i'm addicted to now. My question is, what type of lubricant should I use for my o/u? I keep hearing grease is better suited than oil for shotguns. What brand of grease do you use and highly recommend?

Thanks!
The only place I use grease (non-seize type) is on the treads of choke tubes, any quality brand should do, within the action I stay with a light oil.

The last thing you want is excessive lube in an O/U action, you risk attracting grit and grime which will then in turn wear and damage your gun.

Wipe clean frequently, reapply a thin film of oil, and break them all!
 

MisterHappy

NES Member
Rating - 100%
15   0   0
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Messages
21,473
Likes
6,401
Location
On the 16 yard line, shootin' for the Lewis!
After shooting, take it down, wipe it clean (or do the whole clean-the-gun thing), lightly oil the metal surfaces, put it away (following all applicable laws, of course). Done.

It's a tool, not a Rembrandt painting. It will get scuffs, dings, wear. It's called "character."

Have fun.
 
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
Joined
Mar 5, 2012
Messages
246
Likes
5
Location
South Shore
Thanks, guys! Good tips. I'm not gentle with anything I handle so I'm sure it'll show plenty of "character".

..... within the action I stay with a light oil.
What do you of just giving it a quick Rem-Oil spray (as my oil) and a quick wipe down?
 

icyclefar

NES Member
Rating - 100%
44   0   0
Joined
Jun 12, 2006
Messages
5,195
Likes
764
Location
South Shore
Thanks, guys! Good tips. I'm not gentle with anything I handle so I'm sure it'll show plenty of "character".


What do you of just giving it a quick Rem-Oil spray (as my oil) and a quick wipe down?
A thin film, anyplace metal rubs metal. [thumbsup]
 

vickers

NES Member
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
Joined
Sep 18, 2013
Messages
723
Likes
203
Location
North Shore, MA
I have seen it recommended to not use light oil to lube wooden stocked shotguns as the oil can soften the wood if it runs between the joins and sits on the wood in behind.

For myself, I first wipe the whole gun down with a dry cloth. Then I break the gun apart and really clean out the receiver with a good solvent until all powder residue is removed. I then apply a super light coating of grease at the points where the receiver connects to the barrel. Depending on how your gun goes together you want to lightly grease the pivot points and mating surfaces at the wear points. I use Mil-Comm TW25b grease for that. It's a light non temp sensitive white synthetic grease.

I use a bore snake to run solvent through the barrel until it's clean and then run some light oil through to coat the barrel. Before putting the shotgun away, I wipe all the external metal on the barrel and receiver with a silicon impregnated cloth. That's it.
 
Last edited:

vickers

NES Member
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
Joined
Sep 18, 2013
Messages
723
Likes
203
Location
North Shore, MA
The only place I use grease (non-seize type) is on the treads of choke tubes, any quality brand should do, within the action I stay with a light oil.

The last thing you want is excessive lube in an O/U action, you risk attracting grit and grime which will then in turn wear and damage your gun.

Wipe clean frequently, reapply a thin film of oil, and break them all!
I don't disagree with this, but the grease I recommended will not promote buildup between cleanings especially if you apply it in a thin coat. Plus, if you clean your shotgun after a few uses this shouldn't be a problem anyway. In my opinion, the hinge points on your O/U need a good quality grease lubricant as there is a lot of metal to metal rubbing everytime you break open the action.

I wouldn't recommend grease for the trigger action or to lubricate the firing pins. Assuming you have a box lock gun, once a year (or more if you don't shoot a lot), you should take off the stock and spray out the trigger action and give it a good cleaning with a cleaner/lube. Spray cleaner into the firing pin wells and push the pins in an out to try to dislodge any grit. Afterwards wipe everything down so there is no dripping cleaner or lube left in there which can compromise the wood as I said before. You can also use some pressurized air to blow everything out of there with a cloth behind it to catch the residue. Just be careful you don't damage or lose any parts.

The Powerfactor Show on Youtube had a good video for this. If I can find the link later I will post it in here.
 
Last edited:
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
Joined
Jan 30, 2012
Messages
224
Likes
19
Location
NH
The only place I use grease on an over / under is on the knuckle. Which over under did you get ?
 

rep308

NES Member
Rating - 100%
53   0   0
Joined
Jan 26, 2008
Messages
6,943
Likes
3,113
Location
inside the 495 Belt
Oil is for corrosion protection, grease is for lubrication. Look for the shiny wear areas after you shoot it and put a little grease on those areas. Remington makes grease that comes in a syringe. It is more expensive that way but much easier and neater in my travel pack
 

slap shot

NES Member
Rating - 100%
18   0   0
Joined
Mar 5, 2013
Messages
12,561
Likes
6,736
Location
NH
Awesome choice, I just helped my brother pick out a Lanber 2097 from CDNN based on some input on this forum. It's a beautiful gun and i can't wait to try it.
 
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
Joined
Mar 5, 2012
Messages
246
Likes
5
Location
South Shore
Yeah I can't wait to shoot it! Hopefully I can get out with some buds Sunday but i don't know if the range is plowed. I did get some good ole low temperature grease and lubed up the knuckle and pivot contacts.

Now the question I have is storage. I initially stored it in my tall safe with the buttstock on the ground. Then I learned this is a bad way to store it b/c of any excess oil will drip onto/into the buttstock and make it soft/ruin it. So i now store it barrel down. I know most people store them horizontally but I don't want to leave it out. That's just me.

When you store your o/u, do you have it broken down? Just the simple barrel and receiver disassembled? Any tips on storage ideas. I'll have dig around and I may end up carving out some spare foam blocks so I can always store it in two pieces. But i want to make sure i don't compromise the finish. This would be much easier if I was rich and had a panic room.
 

rep308

NES Member
Rating - 100%
53   0   0
Joined
Jan 26, 2008
Messages
6,943
Likes
3,113
Location
inside the 495 Belt
Yeah I can't wait to shoot it! Hopefully I can get out with some buds Sunday but i don't know if the range is plowed. I did get some good ole low temperature grease and lubed up the knuckle and pivot contacts.

Now the question I have is storage. I initially stored it in my tall safe with the buttstock on the ground. Then I learned this is a bad way to store it b/c of any excess oil will drip onto/into the buttstock and make it soft/ruin it. So i now store it barrel down. I know most people store them horizontally but I don't want to leave it out. That's just me.

When you store your o/u, do you have it broken down? Just the simple barrel and receiver disassembled? Any tips on storage ideas. I'll have dig around and I may end up carving out some spare foam blocks so I can always store it in two pieces. But i want to make sure i don't compromise the finish. This would be much easier if I was rich and had a panic room.
Muzzle up vs down storage is an old one and one not to worry about. Don't oil it much, grease the hinges, and don't mess with the lockwork.
 
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
Joined
Jan 30, 2012
Messages
224
Likes
19
Location
NH
If you're worried about excess oil dripping onto the stock, you're using too much oil. Grease the knuckle and add a drop of oil on the extractors and your good to go. Eventually you'll have to remove the stock to access the internals. Mine were pretty dry. I sprayed some CLP, let it dry for a couple of days, then wiped off the excess. No issues. Great gun, enjoy it.
 
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
Joined
Mar 5, 2012
Messages
246
Likes
5
Location
South Shore
Great tips! Thanks for the heads up guys. It was just my paranoia of oil getting into the stock. Mainly from one of the old guys talking shop with me at the gunshop. Got me all worried and junk.

Yeah I only put a drop on each of the ejectors so it sounds like all is good.
 
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
Joined
Mar 5, 2012
Messages
246
Likes
5
Location
South Shore
Went out this morning and gave a whirl. No stress after shooting that! Could've shot better but still a f'n blast. Why else would anyone wake up early on a snow covered Sunday morning in the woods?.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
Joined
Jan 30, 2012
Messages
224
Likes
19
Location
NH
There's nothing better than shooting a round or 2 ( or 3 ) of clays. I shot 3 rounds of trap yesterday, it was beautiful outside. Keep shooting, you'll improve.
 

sieveboy

NES Member
Rating - 100%
20   0   0
Joined
Sep 22, 2005
Messages
2,017
Likes
957
Location
Franklin, MA
I use superlube; it is clear/colorless so doesn't leave a stain on your gear.

I like the precision oiler for my shotgun case, and keep a tub of the grease in the shop for choke tubes.



Giacomo Sporting introduced me to it

http://www.super-lube.com/
 
Rating - 100%
1   0   0
Joined
Dec 11, 2011
Messages
329
Likes
27
Any grease will do. I am using Redline assembly lube because I happen to have some from other projects. But any decent grease will do. If I didn't have the Redline on hand, I'd buy a tub of white lithium grease at an auto parts store for $5 or whatever and have enough for several dozen guns for several lifetimes.

But grease, yes; not oil.
 
Top Bottom