New ruger precision rifle

PatMcD

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Rarely does somebody show up at a match with a long-action "precision" rifle.
Maybe I'm wrong, but I don't think Ruger's intended market for this rifle is hunters. That's where long actions would have some utility.
In the target world, short stuff rules because they are more accurate.


.270 is 30-06, which is long action. No need for it.
 

Monadnock

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Rarely does somebody show up at a match with a long-action "precision" rifle.
Maybe I'm wrong, but I don't think Ruger's intended market for this rifle is hunters. That's where long actions would have some utility.
In the target world, short stuff rules because they are more accurate..270 is 30-06, which is long action. No need for it.

Yeah, perhaps you're right there. But I must say, being around hunters a lot, I have seen "sporter" rifles appearing more often in-the-woods. And being a Hunter Ed Instructor in NH, I see the looks on the younger generation's faces when we display and let the students handle the firearms. The "sporting" rifles get first looks to-be-sure.

A couple of guys that I know have moved to the AAC .300 Blackout for deer hunting. Why?, well they wanted to use their ARs more, and the .223 round is not optimal for big game in NH. And they didn't want to invest in an AR10, and can reload for and use the same mags for the Blackout, so moved the next step to use as a hunting rifle. And yes, short action still obviously. But, another set of Vets from the middle east conflicts who like the hardware that they trained on and carried.

Granted the Precision is not that, however, it's a "black" rifle, sporter-style. And if you're one of the immense number of returning vets ...and you're a hunter, perhaps the Precision may have more appeal than you think in that direction. In NH, a 40 yard shot is typical. Across a field or on the power lines ...perhaps a hundred yards. Out west, ...flatter lands ....you need to reach out. Plus, it's cool lookin' too, don't forget that feature.
 
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Very interesting discussion gents, I have been tinkering in my head with a long range rifle, not hunting but target and who knows, tossing back and forth between 338 lapua and the 6.5 credemore my only issue is finding somewhere around that I can actually stretch her legs, being in New England with a 1000 yard plus rifle is like driving a Lamborghini around a Walmart parking lot
 

PatMcD

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I am not being a punk, I really don't know much about the precision game, but why is this?
Shorter action makes for a stiffer action, which is thought to translate into a more accurate rifle.
On top of that, shorter cartridges means a more compact powder column, which means more uniform ignition. Again, more accuracy.

Barrel lengths are not short. Usually 26" minimum.

Targets don't care how much energy they receive (paper targets, which I'm assuming this rifle is marketed towards). Check out what competitors shoot for cartridges at Camp Perry. Lots of .308, 6.5-08, 6XC, 6BR,, etc.. If anybody has ever brought a .338 Lapua, I've never heard of it.
 
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I agree I was looking at the 6.5 credemore alot of Perry guys seem to like it I just dont know how much I would get to stretch her out around here, I already have a .308 for my main rifle
 

edmorseiii

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Shorter action makes for a stiffer action, which is thought to translate into a more accurate rifle.
On top of that, shorter cartridges means a more compact powder column, which means more uniform ignition. Again, more accuracy.


Makes sense.
 
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Yup. Cartridges like the 6mm ppc are very short and fat. If you think about it, you want as much powder as close to the source of ignition as possible. In a perfect world, the powder would be in the shape of a sphere with the primer in the middle.

Don

6PPC.png
 

PatMcD

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I was at Cabela's yesterday and asked if they had one in stock. The guy I asked had no idea what I was talking about. I made him look it up on their computer and order some. Told him "You'll sell as many of these things as you can get in. I'm not buying one, but trust me: they will sell".
 

PatMcD

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Went back to cabelas today and they had one in. 308 on the rack. I worked the bolt a few times and it felt kind of jerky. Not at all slick. Hopefully with use it will improve. The trigger needs to go. It's ok for an occasional target rifle, but the blade bothers me.

Marked $1299 which looks like it's $300 too high.
 

chris_1001

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Went back to cabelas today and they had one in. 308 on the rack. I worked the bolt a few times and it felt kind of jerky. Not at all slick. Hopefully with use it will improve. The trigger needs to go. It's ok for an occasional target rifle, but the blade bothers me.

Marked $1299 which looks like it's $300 too high.

I put my paws on that one also (Tues night). I also thought the Bolt was sloppy and not at all what I would have expected and wanted on a "Precision Rifle". It to me just felt loose, not something that would get better.

I did like the rest of it. But I did not try the trigger. And I'm also not a fan of the blade. On my Glocks it's OK. But not on a rifle.

I also agree. $999 is what it should be.
 
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Went back to cabelas today and they had one in. 308 on the rack. I worked the bolt a few times and it felt kind of jerky. Not at all slick. Hopefully with use it will improve. The trigger needs to go. It's ok for an occasional target rifle, but the blade bothers me.

Marked $1299 which looks like it's $300 too high.

MSRP on the gun is $1399.

Dealer cost in quantities of 1 is $835. So $999 is more like what you will see. Cabbalas is reaching.

Regarding the bolt feel, you guys are all romance. How the bolt works in the action is what everyone talks about. But it has zero bearing on how a gun shoots or cycles. A gritty wobbly bolt can be cycled just as fast as a glass smooth perfect bolt.

What matters is how the bolt locks up in the barrel. Whether the lugs are uniformly loaded, whether the face of the bolt is true and perpendicular with the bore. Unfortunately you can't see any of that.

So what would you rather have on your $1000 gun? A glass smooth bolt like grandpa's old deer gun that shot 3 MOA. Or this miracle of modern manufacturing that is a bit rough where it doesn't matter, but shoots a bit over 1/2 MOA for nearly everyone who tries it?

Something's gotta give. At least for $1000.

Don
 

76Too

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MSRP on the gun is $1399.

Dealer cost in quantities of 1 is $835. So $999 is more like what you will see. Cabbalas is reaching.

Regarding the bolt feel, you guys are all romance. How the bolt works in the action is what everyone talks about. But it has zero bearing on how a gun shoots or cycles. A gritty wobbly bolt can be cycled just as fast as a glass smooth perfect bolt.

What matters is how the bolt locks up in the barrel. Whether the lugs are uniformly loaded, whether the face of the bolt is true and perpendicular with the bore. Unfortunately you can't see any of that.

So what would you rather have on your $1000 gun? A glass smooth bolt like grandpa's old deer gun that shot 3 MOA. Or this miracle of modern manufacturing that is a bit rough where it doesn't matter, but shoots a bit over 1/2 MOA for nearly everyone who tries it?

Something's gotta give. At least for $1000.

Don

here, here!
 

PatMcD

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MSRP on the gun is $1399.

Dealer cost in quantities of 1 is $835. So $999 is more like what you will see. Cabbalas is reaching.

Regarding the bolt feel, you guys are all romance. How the bolt works in the action is what everyone talks about. But it has zero bearing on how a gun shoots or cycles. A gritty wobbly bolt can be cycled just as fast as a glass smooth perfect bolt.

What matters is how the bolt locks up in the barrel. Whether the lugs are uniformly loaded, whether the face of the bolt is true and perpendicular with the bore. Unfortunately you can't see any of that.

So what would you rather have on your $1000 gun? A glass smooth bolt like grandpa's old deer gun that shot 3 MOA. Or this miracle of modern manufacturing that is a bit rough where it doesn't matter, but shoots a bit over 1/2 MOA for nearly everyone who tries it?

Something's gotta give. At least for $1000.

Don
I agree, but,......I want it ALL!

I do think bolt smoothness is important, though. Maybe not for most people and the way they'll use it, but it is important for the way I would use it.
 

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I wouldn't let the smoothness of the bolt, as the rifle sits in a store, concern me until the rifle was disassembled, fully cleaned and lubed. These are machines that, once finished, are treated for storage. Many corrosion inhibitors are not good lubricants just as many lubricants are not good corrosion inhibitors.
 

PatMcD

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Can you explain? You are clearly more experienced than most of us in long range shooting. Lets hear the insight.

Don
No insight here. To me, all "precision" rifles are measured by how they would perform in across the course highpower competition, which includes rapid fire stages. Any bolt hangup is going to impair getting 10 good shots off in 60 seconds.

I guess I'm nit picking Ruger rifle, but I'm looking at it through a very narrow lens.
 
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Pat,

I don't want to confuse smoothness with effort. A savage bolt is sloppy but effort is low once it unlocks. When its locked up, the floating head makes lockup nice and smooth.

Having shot a bolt gun under timed stress, I can tell you that the effort for the bolt lift, which cocks the striker in most cases, is far more important to speed than how smooth the bolt actually is when it runs back.

I've shot a Tubb 2000, which I think is the high watermark for this kind of thing. I could cycle it with my index finger and nothing else. It was very fast.

Don
 

1903Collector

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There was a write up recently in the AR magazine, I guess the action is based of the Ruger American series. I've handle the 308 version and it's pretty heavy, I wouldn't want to haul the thing around the bush all day. When I shouldered it felt very natural for me. I'm used to the Accutrigger so the blade doesn't bother me and you can adjust it down to 2lbs or so and I also like the fact that it can use a bunch of different magazines and it would appear to be highly adaptable with regard to stocks, grips and such. If it is successful I wonder if they would offer it in a long action?
 

PatMcD

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Pat,

I don't want to confuse smoothness with effort. A savage bolt is sloppy but effort is low once it unlocks. When its locked up, the floating head makes lockup nice and smooth.

Having shot a bolt gun under timed stress, I can tell you that the effort for the bolt lift, which cocks the striker in most cases, is far more important to speed than how smooth the bolt actually is when it runs back.

I've shot a Tubb 2000, which I think is the high watermark for this kind of thing. I could cycle it with my index finger and nothing else. It was very fast.

Don
T2K or a good Eliseo Tube gun or a slicked up winchester model 70. I don't see the Ruger getting anywhere near as fast, but I've been wrong before.
There was a write up recently in the AR magazine, I guess the action is based of the Ruger American series. I've handle the 308 version and it's pretty heavy, I wouldn't want to haul the thing around the bush all day. When I shouldered it felt very natural for me. I'm used to the Accutrigger so the blade doesn't bother me and you can adjust it down to 2lbs or so and I also like the fact that it can use a bunch of different magazines and it would appear to be highly adaptable with regard to stocks, grips and such. If it is successful I wonder if they would offer it in a long action?
See my post#121 on why I don't think it makes any sense in a long action. I don't see this as a hunting rifle.
 

KMM696

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T2K or a good Eliseo Tube gun or a slicked up winchester model 70. I don't see the Ruger getting anywhere near as fast, but I've been wrong before.

See my post#121 on why I don't think it makes any sense in a long action. I don't see this as a hunting rifle.

Depends on whether the long range hunting crowd would go for it. No idea myself how big that market actually is, never hunted soybean fields or the Rockies myself.
 

wahsben

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Yup, I forgot that .338 is long action so unless they come out with a long action it's not happening.

Have you been told this specifically? I doubt that the action is long enough for the .338 LM.

Like I said earlier. This is the lowest price gun by a huge margin to dispense with the old school tubular receiver and bedded integration into a stock. Its a small fraction of the MRAD or Tubb 2K or whatever McMillan calls it now.

I'll predict that a huge aftermarket will develop for this gun including bolt truing and barrel replacement. With a blueprinted bolt and a precision, hand lapped barrel like a Bartlein, there is no reason it can't compete with guns costing $5000.
 

wahsben

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It's very difficult to find. You most likely will have to order it and wait. Also I've been having a hard time finding the ammo too. I've had to order some and when I do find a place that has it they usually only have about 1 to 3 boxes available.

I have been calling around trying to find one in 6.5 Creedmoor. Has anybody seen one anywhere in NE?
 
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