New Push for Microstamping; Proponents Claim Technology ‘Has Arrived’

mikeyp

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This shit again...


1612926271450.png
A new report claims microstamping technology “has arrived” and is ready. All that’s needed is legislation to make it a requirement.

U.S.A.-(AmmoLand.com)- Proponents of microstamping—the process or stamping an “alpha-numeric code” onto the primer surface of cartridge case when hit by the firing pin—claim the technology “has arrived, but needs legislation to push it through,” according to a new report released this week by the anti-gun Educational Fund to Stop Gun Violence (EFSGV).

“The next step is to enact laws that would require microstamping to be incorporated in all new firearms after a certain date, a coalition spokesperson said during a webinar on the topic,” according to WCMH News in Columbus, Ohio, reporting on a webinar the group held this week to announce its report.
“They also want Congress to require that all semi-automatic pistols in the US are equipped with microstamps for their bullets,” the report stated.
“The report comes as U.S. gun homicides sharply increased in 2020, a troubling percentage of which go unsolved each year,” the gun control group said in a news release. “To maximize the potential of the technology, the EFSGV report recommends that state and federal lawmakers take action by requiring that new semi-automatic pistols come equipped with the invaluable technology.”

Just how this might play into Joe Biden’s gun control agenda isn’t known at this point.​

But Larry Keane, senior vice president and general counsel for the National Shooting Sports Foundation, insisted the technology won’t “help solve gun crimes, identify gun trafficking networks and reduce gun violence” as proponents claim.


“There has never been a gun sold anywhere in the world incorporating this patented sole-source technology because it doesn’t work, it can’t work, it will never work,” Keane said via email.
He referred Ammoland News to an NSSF report on microstamping. Buried in that report is an estimate that microstamping would add more than $200 to the cost of a firearm.

On the other hand, the EFSGV quotes a letter from Orrin Gallop, assistant chief, commander of Investigative Services for the Hampton, Va., Police Division in which he contends, “A recovered microstamped shell casing would provide law enforcement immediately with the name of the first purchaser of the firearm. This allows for a more focused investigation, and the first step in the roadmap of how the weapon made its way from the first purchaser to the crime scene. This has the potential to help law enforcement quickly and effectively solve gun-related crimes while limiting negative interactions with law enforcement, especially in minority communities.”

And there is another problem gun control proponents don’t seem eager to address. Microstamping could only work if police recover empty shell casings at a crime scene, and to thwart this, all a criminal would have to do is use a revolver, which does not eject fired empty cases.

The new microstamping threat comes as no surprise to gun rights organizations. Coincidentally, the Citizens Committee for the Right to Keep and Bear Arms, and Second Amendment Foundation, just launched an online effort they call Gun Rights Outreach to Defeat Gun Control Overreach.” Both groups are reaching out to gun owners, providing them with “intellectual ammunition” to defeat the gun prohibition lobby.

When the new microstamping report was announced, Ammoland News reached out to a spokesperson with a simple question: “How many crimes have been solved, with perpetrators arrested, prosecuted and convicted, thanks to microstamping?”

There has been no response so far, and Ammoland can find no reports or anecdotal evidence of a single crime that has been solved thanks to the technology.

Proponents have offered statements filled with promise and potential, but no evidence of results.​

“Microstamping is a ready to implement technology that holds tremendous potential to address our current crises of rising gun violence and lack of trust in law enforcement due in part to unconscionably low clearance rates for gun crime investigations, especially in Black communities,” according to Josh Horwitz, Executive Director of the Educational Fund to Stop Gun Violence. “Microstamping is a small technology that will lead to big changes — a reduction in gun violence, less gun trafficking, more trust in law enforcement, and more justice for victims and their families.”
Such rhetoric seems like boilerplate at best. Simply being able to establish that a fired cartridge case can identify the gun from which it came is only part of the process. There’s still no way to identify who fired the shot, and if the particular gun was stolen, then what?

Critics point to the situation in California, where legislation signed last year by anti-gun Democrat Gov. Gavin Newsom requires new handguns sold in the state to have microstamping.

Writing in the San Francisco Chronicle, Ari Riser, a policy analyst for the anti-gun Coalition to Stop Gun Violence (CSGV), insisted the firearms industry must accept the technology while offering no evidence that it will solve or prevent crimes, or reduce so-called “gun violence.”

Conversely, writing in the Lost Angeles Times nearly three years ago, Republican State Assemblyman Matthew Harper recalled that the microstamping issue has prevented gun manufacturers from introducing any new handgun models in the state since 2013. At that time, he noted, “It won’t get illegal guns off the street but will only drive up the cost of handguns made before 2013, making them unaffordable to Californians on a budget who wish to exercise their Second Amendment rights.”

According to one CSVG report, a test conducted in May 2007 “demonstrated the endurance and durability of the technology. During that test, (researchers) fired over 2,500 rounds from a microstamped Smith and Wesson .40 caliber semiautomatic handgun using five different brands of ammunition. Microstamped markings from the firing pin were transferred successfully 97% of the time using both Optical Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy. Additionally, breech face markings transferred to cartridge casings 96% of the time.
“These tests demonstrate the viability of microstamping under even the most extreme conditions,” CSGV said, “but very rarely are handguns fired thousands of times before being used in crimes.”
On the other hand, a report from the Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation noted, “Two separate research studies have concluded that this technology is ‘unreliable. Research experts from the University of California, Davis, at the behest of the California State Legislature, found microstamping to be ‘flawed’ and concluded that ‘at the current time it is not recommended that a mandate for implementation of this technology in all semi-automatic handguns in the state of California be made.’”

Researchers at UC Davis reported, “the codes on the face of the pin can easily be removed with household tools.”
 

AHM

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But ammo is expensive... even criminals are probably picking up the brass now for reloading.
What this world needs is a Police Procedural episode where the guys from the Lab
are tearing their hair out - the murder was committed by a pistol not revolver,
and it seems to have been committed by some street gangster -
but they can't find the fired case.

And then the slueths stumble upon a Brass Rat
kicking trash aside, peering into the gutter
at another murder scene.
 

hminsky

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Someone should tell them about the experience of the Canadian gun registry. For a country of 30 million people , they mandated a gun registration system
that ended up as going to cost them over a billion dollars, and basically never solved a single crime. They ended up scrapping it, sensibly.
 

allen-1

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Researchers at UC Davis reported, “the codes on the face of the pin can easily be removed with household tools.”

No shit. I have a drawer in my rollaway that contains nothing but files.
And replacement firing pins for my competition guns - that also fit my carry guns.
 
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This shit again...


View attachment 448277
A new report claims microstamping technology “has arrived” and is ready. All that’s needed is legislation to make it a requirement.

U.S.A.-(AmmoLand.com)- Proponents of microstamping—the process or stamping an “alpha-numeric code” onto the primer surface of cartridge case when hit by the firing pin—claim the technology “has arrived, but needs legislation to push it through,” according to a new report released this week by the anti-gun Educational Fund to Stop Gun Violence (EFSGV).


Just how this might play into Joe Biden’s gun control agenda isn’t known at this point.​

But Larry Keane, senior vice president and general counsel for the National Shooting Sports Foundation, insisted the technology won’t “help solve gun crimes, identify gun trafficking networks and reduce gun violence” as proponents claim.



He referred Ammoland News to an NSSF report on microstamping. Buried in that report is an estimate that microstamping would add more than $200 to the cost of a firearm.

On the other hand, the EFSGV quotes a letter from Orrin Gallop, assistant chief, commander of Investigative Services for the Hampton, Va., Police Division in which he contends, “A recovered microstamped shell casing would provide law enforcement immediately with the name of the first purchaser of the firearm. This allows for a more focused investigation, and the first step in the roadmap of how the weapon made its way from the first purchaser to the crime scene. This has the potential to help law enforcement quickly and effectively solve gun-related crimes while limiting negative interactions with law enforcement, especially in minority communities.”

And there is another problem gun control proponents don’t seem eager to address. Microstamping could only work if police recover empty shell casings at a crime scene, and to thwart this, all a criminal would have to do is use a revolver, which does not eject fired empty cases.

The new microstamping threat comes as no surprise to gun rights organizations. Coincidentally, the Citizens Committee for the Right to Keep and Bear Arms, and Second Amendment Foundation, just launched an online effort they call Gun Rights Outreach to Defeat Gun Control Overreach.” Both groups are reaching out to gun owners, providing them with “intellectual ammunition” to defeat the gun prohibition lobby.

When the new microstamping report was announced, Ammoland News reached out to a spokesperson with a simple question: “How many crimes have been solved, with perpetrators arrested, prosecuted and convicted, thanks to microstamping?”

There has been no response so far, and Ammoland can find no reports or anecdotal evidence of a single crime that has been solved thanks to the technology.

Proponents have offered statements filled with promise and potential, but no evidence of results.​


Such rhetoric seems like boilerplate at best. Simply being able to establish that a fired cartridge case can identify the gun from which it came is only part of the process. There’s still no way to identify who fired the shot, and if the particular gun was stolen, then what?

Critics point to the situation in California, where legislation signed last year by anti-gun Democrat Gov. Gavin Newsom requires new handguns sold in the state to have microstamping.

Writing in the San Francisco Chronicle, Ari Riser, a policy analyst for the anti-gun Coalition to Stop Gun Violence (CSGV), insisted the firearms industry must accept the technology while offering no evidence that it will solve or prevent crimes, or reduce so-called “gun violence.”

Conversely, writing in the Lost Angeles Times nearly three years ago, Republican State Assemblyman Matthew Harper recalled that the microstamping issue has prevented gun manufacturers from introducing any new handgun models in the state since 2013. At that time, he noted, “It won’t get illegal guns off the street but will only drive up the cost of handguns made before 2013, making them unaffordable to Californians on a budget who wish to exercise their Second Amendment rights.”


On the other hand, a report from the Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation noted, “Two separate research studies have concluded that this technology is ‘unreliable. Research experts from the University of California, Davis, at the behest of the California State Legislature, found microstamping to be ‘flawed’ and concluded that ‘at the current time it is not recommended that a mandate for implementation of this technology in all semi-automatic handguns in the state of California be made.’”

Researchers at UC Davis reported, “the codes on the face of the pin can easily be removed with household tools.”
Each round fired wears on the gun and changes it. Firing pin, chamber, barrel, ejector and extractor. Just like sharpening an edged weapon removes a small amount of steel. This simple fact was obviously lost on the anti-gun morons who push these idiotic schemes.
 

CrackPot

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Each round fired wears on the gun and changes it. Firing pin, chamber, barrel, ejector and extractor. Just like sharpening an edged weapon removes a small amount of steel. This simple fact was obviously lost on the anti-gun morons who push these idiotic schemes.
Not lost at all. You will be required to purchase and install (or have installed) a new firing pin every 500 rounds to insure the effectiveness. Firing pins will become regulated. Preban pins will go up in value and become the new currency. Import of all guns, parts, ammo, and components will be banned. Ammo will be taxed as will your guns. Federal registry and annual taxes.

A new gun owner will spend $2000 for the cheapest hipoint. It will cost them $5 every time they pull the trigger between ammo cost, tax, wear and tear on the micro stamping, etc. It sill cost $1000 a year to own the gun because of taxes, mandatory Insurance and mandatory psych testing.

You really think they don’t know what they are doing?
 

Tinkermatic

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To think any of the people committing the crimes give a damn who the first owner was is whats laughable. Sure, go knock on Tom Smith’s door who bought the gun 9 years ago, sold it to Steve who sold it to Keith who says he lost it in a boating accident where it was found by a magnet fisher and pawned for $59, then “stolen” (sold out the back, off the books).

This is just another way to harass gun owners without addressing the actual problem; criminals don’t f***ing care what’s legal or not! Heck, I’d bet they’d be thrilled if the shooting investigation started 3 states over! They’d be installing randomly generated firing pins to throw the cops off.
My god people are dumb.
 

67ray

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I can see a market for ammunition that doesn't pick up the microstamping. For instance using a material that won't retain the stamp or will blow out when the powder deflagrates
.
 
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now we know why HR127 includes prosecuting the original purchaser of a firearm for any crime committed by anyone that acquires that firearms without regard for whether said acquisition was lawful. Includes a fine of $100K and up to 25 years in prison.
So if a criminal commits a murder and police can't identify and catch him, they'll just arrest and prosecute the original purchaser.
 

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Researchers at UC Davis reported, “the codes on the face of the pin can easily be removed with household tools.”

No shit. I have a drawer in my rollaway that contains nothing but files.
And replacement firing pins for my competition guns - that also fit my carry guns.

Shhhh.... What you’re talking about now may some day be illegal in the future, so they might convict you now for a future crime that hasn’t happened yet...

527591FE-6C95-447E-8EB9-A12BA4B9D139.gif
 
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now we know why HR127 includes prosecuting the original purchaser of a firearm for any crime committed by anyone that acquires that firearms without regard for whether said acquisition was lawful. Includes a fine of $100K and up to 25 years in prison.
So if a criminal commits a murder and police can't identify and catch him, they'll just arrest and prosecute the original purchaser.
With decriminalization of drugs and criminalization of firearms and ammunition ownership, the Mexican cartels will soon have a new, very lucrative, cash crop.
 
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Someone should tell them about the experience of the Canadian gun registry. For a country of 30 million people , they mandated a gun registration system
that ended up as going to cost them over a billion dollars, and basically never solved a single crime. They ended up scrapping it, sensibly.

$1 billion? Jesus. I could make a data entry/query front end to a sqlite database for merely $100 million worst case. Some custom CSS for $20 million extra. Canada - DM me next time.
 
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Not lost at all. You will be required to purchase and install (or have installed) a new firing pin every 500 rounds to insure the effectiveness. Firing pins will become regulated.

Always have at least one friend who owns a lathe
 

Mesatchornug

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Could you set off a primer with a laser? It would be interesting to test out what the smallest laser that could do it is. I have a few ideas now...
How long are you willing to wait? If the laser can heat the surface it's peirce on, eventually it'll light...

ETA - other than to say you did it, there's a really big "BUT Y THO?" hanging on that one. There's so much energy wasted converting electricity > light crossing some distance (and waste heat) > heat > combustion when you can just go straight from electricity > heat > combustion
 
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paul73

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A gang banger can just stop up at any local range and pick up a pile of brass and toss it around the scene.
there is absolutely nothing in any gun control legislation that was ever driven by reducing crimes agenda. it is not what it is aimed at. it is aimed at you and every legal owner.
criminals are government best friends - they terrorize the population same way as government does and justifies increased government oppression of the population in the name of protection from crime.
as if citizens would be able to protect themselves - who needs to feed the government?
 

Kevin_NH

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80% firing pins will become all the rage. You buy a bunch of blanks that need to be "machined" to final length.
I'm going that route anyway, after seeing the 2 week delivery timeframe and $18 price tag for a single firing pin for a less-than-common firearm. $18 in steel rod and a few hours with the CNC lathe will yield many pins...

Could you set off a primer with a laser? It would be interesting to test out what the smallest laser that could do it is. I have a few ideas now...
Short the amps you'd be using for the laser directly across the primer and it'll hopefully go bang before it goes to liquid.

Some of the same groups working on 3d-printable firearms designs and EDM barrel making are also exploring alternate approaches to reloading which bypass the need for commercial primers. Simplest method is to take the EtronX path and use the "primer" (now electrically isolated and chemically inert) as one conductor and the brass casing as your ground:
 
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Ultimate Shield

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Speaking as a Machinist... Do these renegade autists not realize how unbelievably easy it is to create a new firing pin without this microstamping bullshit? Like Jesus Christ... This is why trades should still be part of regular education. The rampant weaponized ignorance is astounding
 

AJK129

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How long are you willing to wait? If the laser can heat the surface it's peirce on, eventually it'll light...

ETA - other than to say you did it, there's a really big "BUT Y THO?" hanging on that one. There's so much energy wasted converting electricity > light crossing some distance (and waste heat) > heat > combustion when you can just go straight from electricity > heat > combustion
Im more just interested in trying it than anything
 
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