New pedestrian bridge collapses in Miami...

W.E.C

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Not fair...

At least she has a hard hat and vest on..

Unlike half the people on that bridge job site ,even AFTER the collapse ffs.

And those guys on the roof with no fall protection, wtf?

And the personnel boom lift ,what was going on there?
There was no one in it, did the guy fall out?
I can see dozens of safety violations just by looking at the aftermath pictures .
 
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And those guys on the roof with no fall protection, wtf?
He was tied on to the bridge itself. They ran a cable across the top of the bridge as a tie in, which is pretty common. If you look closely at some of the photos you can see it and even the harness, lanyard he was using--and a blood splatter on the concrete. Poor guy.

I think the manlift was just parked there idle. Was probably used to get the worker on the bridge then backed away as to not interfere with the crane.
 

W.E.C

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He was tied on to the bridge itself. They ran a cable across the top of the bridge as a tie in, which is pretty common. If you look closely at some of the photos you can see it and even the harness, lanyard he was using--and a blood splatter on the concrete. Poor guy.

I think the manlift was just parked there idle. Was probably used to get the worker on the bridge then backed away as to not interfere with the crane.
It was common practice to tie off my fall protection to the bucket lift , and I didn’t like it ,
For the reason if I tipped over the unit I’m trapped in the basket and going down for the ride.

Now I’m thinking it’s a good idea when on shaky deals like the bridge roof.
 

new guy

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He was tied on to the bridge itself. They ran a cable across the top of the bridge as a tie in, which is pretty common. If you look closely at some of the photos you can see it and even the harness, lanyard he was using--and a blood splatter on the concrete. Poor guy.

I think the manlift was just parked there idle. Was probably used to get the worker on the bridge then backed away as to not interfere with the crane.
From that video on the previous page it looks like he was (poorly) connected to something that didn’t fall. Like he slipped out of a harness or something, which also fell a second later, after the line snapped back.
 
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It's insane that they were doing the tensioning with traffic under the "bridge." How many of the drivers realized what was going on overhead? How many of the actual workers/hard hats do you think were underneath the slab at the time? I'm guessing not many.

If a whole bridge falls on your head.... Not having a hard hat will be the leadl of your problems
 

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If a whole bridge falls on your head.... Not having a hard hat will be the leadl of your problems
I was referring to the workers in general as hard hats, as in “how many of the workers were stupid enough to be standing under the slab while they were tensioning it?” despite the fact that they were fine with a bunch of cars stopped at a red light being underneath it.
 

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Should wear a mouth guard too. It would suck to have your tongue out when it comes down, but I guess the mouth heals relatively quickly.
 
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From that video on the previous page it looks like he was (poorly) connected to something that didn’t fall. Like he slipped out of a harness or something, which also fell a second later, after the line snapped back.
I saw that and was trying to determine what happened myself. I doubt there was an intentional plan to suspend him from the crane. It does look like for a brief second he's held up by something but after watching it a couple more times I think that's just the normal separation that occurs when the platform you're standing on drops beneath you. It is possible though that his lanyard and tie in cable yanked him up/down/sideways during the fall.

The photo on the ground shows the harness, lanyard and tie in cable all intact. He was close to the crane rigging too though so that could have been what caused him to get yanked around.



and

 
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It was common practice to tie off my fall protection to the bucket lift , and I didn’t like it ,
For the reason if I tipped over the unit I’m trapped in the basket and going down for the ride.

Now I’m thinking it’s a good idea when on shaky deals like the bridge roof.
it's always a crap shoot as to when/how you tie in but I think you're generally better off tying in on boom arms. they have a funny habit of flexing and catapulting you out like a bucking bronco!
 

W.E.C

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it's always a crap shoot as to when/how you tie in but I think you're generally better off tying in on boom arms. they have a funny habit of flexing and catapulting you out like a bucking bronco!

Yep! Over 60ft. If you don’t feather the hydrolic levers right, and stop short you get bad whip action. :eek:
 
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I was referring to the workers in general as hard hats, as in “how many of the workers were stupid enough to be standing under the slab while they were tensioning it?” despite the fact that they were fine with a bunch of cars stopped at a red light being underneath it.
Fair point.
 

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Yep that is pretty conclusive. Broke right at the point the crane was at, and a worker was at on the roof too. Must have been a crack they were inspecting/repairing.

Guy in the silver leftmost suv...luckiest guy alive....missed it by half a second

remembering back, this reminds me a little of the I-35 bridge collapse in Minnesota 11 years ago. Workmen repairing bridge, find crack in doubler plate...try to fix it...without stopping traffic. 13 people dead.

Seems like the feds need to be involved in any sort of bridge over a federal highway, with traffic forced to shut down if a dangerous structural defect is found. take the decision out of the hands of managers, and engineers. I am sure the engineer in FL said "there is a very low risk in fixing this bridge with traffic moving underneath", but he did not say there was a "ZERO risk"! Where human lives are at risk....the budget should not be not an issue.
 
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kman

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I think it's the perfect rebuttal to the lefties slogan..."Build walls instead of Bridges" Oh wait, not those kind of bridges!!
 

calsdad

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Could the engineering be fine and the problem the idiots who built it?

Yep!

Woodpile Report

=====

There may yet be a "smoking gun" in the Florida bridge debacle, defective materials or somesuch, but the more we learn, the more it appears to be simple incompetence. And the incompetence appears to be the involvement of unqualified but diverse managers at the decision-making level.

It's said the real purpose of the project was to distribute "Transportation Investments Generating Economic Recovery" funds to coalitions favored by the Obama administration. The bridge itself was to be a gussied up showpiece for diversity in the workplace, but otherwise a no-brainer. Fussy adherence to the "masculine culture of academic rigor" meant reinforcing "gender, race, and class hierarchies in engineering", therefore didn't matter.

What mattered was placing Diversities in conspicuous, high-paying positions, the kind that hold news conferences with snappy artist's conceptions and laser pointers and say "disadvantaged" a lot. Which means decision-making without the chops to make them.

Robust design has redundancies and safety margins to compensate for substandard components or faulty workmanship, or plain bad luck. Decision-makers know and abide by those standards, they're the load-bearing walls of the project. Said differently, an airliner may be well fitted to its purpose, but it can't survive a pilot who does aerobatics and flies it into the ground.

There's an old saying, "engineering projects are never really done, they're abandoned in a usable condition". An overstatement of course, it means chaos neatly organized is chaos nonetheless. But a project isn't a morality play, nor does the process have to be graceful and charming, only results count. Project managers are as relieved as anyone when the final snapshot of such chaos, frozen as-is in the final minute, conforms to requirements in all its particulars.

Engineering project management is known as "the meat grinder" for its uncompromising nature. You have one task, you get one chance. It's a pass-fail proposition. The Mafia was more lenient. There are no excuses. There is no forgiveness or understanding. There is no negotiable fuzziness. This is why The Diversity is generally uninterested in such work, and women even less so.

Those who do pose as project managers unfailingly become innocent bystanders when It All Goes Wrong, as if "best effort" and good intent exempted them from responsibility. Absolution is given before the dust settles, also unfailingly, and the search for an alternative guilty party begins. Nothing serious should ever be attempted with this arrangement. When it is, someone will have a pedestrian bridge in Florida to sell.


======
 

Palladin

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Miami bridge fall blamed on design, lack of oversight

1. faulty engineering

2. The 19-month investigation concluded the company that had been tasked to conduct an independent review and spot potential design errors was mistakenly listed as qualified by the state transportation department.

The National Transportation Safety Board members concluded that the design firm FIGG Bridge Engineers, Inc. underestimated the load of the bridge and overestimated its strength in a critical section that splintered, dropping a 174-foot-long (53-meter-long) span onto eight cars on March 15, 2018.
 

M1911

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I suppose I ought to read the NTSB report. I was a civil engineer in a previous life and I don’t understand how they could have made such mistakes. How could they have seen those cracks on the bridge and not realize that the bridge was in danger of collapse? How could they see that and not immediately shut down traffic?
 

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