New Firearms Acquisitions June 2021

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Picton

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Been wanting a commander size 1911 in 45 and this piece does not disappoint! Its boringly accurate. I keep going back to 1911s and this just may become my new EDC.



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I had one of the solid-slide versions. One of my few sales regrets as far as function and handling, but I couldn't get into the two-tone. As you say, boringly accurate.

Nice!
 
D

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Technically an April acquisition but this had to go to the gunsmith right off the bat.

Manufrance Robust in 12-gauge with 28" barrels. Bores are 0.724". Chokes haven't been opened up, still original "Demi-Choke" (half-choke, MOD) and "Choke" (full-choke). By modern standards this would be Full and Extra Full. Made either in 1914 or 1919; WW1 temporarily ended commercial gun production for Manufrance, when they became a barrel subcontractor for the war effort. The brown-looking stuff on the receiver is the remnants of the formerly-vibrant color case hardening. No import marks and as far as I know, these were never directly sold into the US. So, with no import mark and no direct sales, I think this probably came home with a GI from either WW1 or shortly thereafter or WW2.

The gun handles fairly well for me and even in its ancient state, better than most pumps and semi-autos. I now get why people like SxS guns for upland hunting. Very light for a 12-gauge, around 6.5lbs. I obviously won't be shooting turkey loads or slugs out of this.

I may have this restored by New England Custom Gun next year if I feel like dropping the cash. The gun had a few issues when I originally took it home, like a small dent in the barrel, a missing bead, the safety gummed up to the point of being inoperable, and the action not fully opening. I took the gun to Gunsmithing Ltd. (Mitch Schultz) and the gun is in good working order now. They also opened up the chambers to 2 3/4" and swapped out the buttplate for a Kick-Eez pad - they gave me back the buttplate and didn't cut the stock, thankfully.

Really interesting gun and I hope to use it grouse, woodcock, and pheasant hunting this year.
 
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heron163

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this usually gets purses swinging...

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drgrant

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I have one of the first run of SW1911s, a JRD prefix gun and its one I won't part with.

Did your safety plunger tube fall off? (The thing that holds the safety and slide lock detents) Next time you clean your gun check to see if it's loose. There were hundreds of 1911SC and PD guns with that problem due to a bad mim casting.
 

1903Collector

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Did your safety plunger tube fall off? (The thing that holds the safety and slide lock detents) Next time you clean your gun check to see if it's loose. There were hundreds of 1911SC and PD guns with that problem due to a bad mim casting.
Negative, nice and tight. I have heard a couple of stories about the JRD guns, one was the frames were made by Wilson. Another was that they have afermarket parts inside and they were put together by S&W under the eye of performance center workers training other S&W employees. Not sure if any of that is true or not but from all the reading I have done the JRD prefix guns are considered excellent quality and are highly regarded. I know the fit and finish on the one I have is excellent and its a great shooter. Better overall than the E-series or the Pro series that I also own.
 
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