New 2020 Python

JRT

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Shit shouldn't happen when your revolver costs twice the competitions price, and the competitions works.
You must have fallen asleep. Hickok loved the python 'til it stopped working, then, the same as he said about the NRA, he wished them the best and hoped the issues got sorted out.
I don’t make my decisions off the opinion of some random old dude with a YouTube channel. He had an unexplainable failure in what could have been hours of shooting edited down to 35 mins. Which could have been edited to 5.
 
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Me neither. I make my opinion by having worked for Colts in the past, 1980's, and nearly going to work for them again.
Back in the '80's, Colt hit up Uncle Sam for a billion dollar loan, purpose of recapitalization. All us shop rat idiots thought that meant new machinery, tooling, gaging etc...nope, it meant share price went from $17-$97 overnight. People got rich, people went to jail for insider trading, nothing for the shop was purchased, and Colt filed bankruptcy. 1985ish, big strike, production continued despite lack of experienced help. 2016, job offer as QE, interview just didn't feel right, declined the offer.
 

June4th

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I hate everyone trying to dance on a potential grave of a firearm manufacturer. Try running a firearm company and deal with day to day business plus because you make firearms, here is a another pile of regulations you need to adhere to. And oh BTW Massachusetts Department of Public Safety called “Your Guns are scary so we don’t want them. And BTW, even if we OK them Maura Healy needs to give her dispensation one it.
Me neither. I make my opinion by having worked for Colts in the past, 1980's, and nearly going to work for them again.
Back in the '80's, Colt hit up Uncle Sam for a billion dollar loan, purpose of recapitalization. All us shop rat idiots thought that meant new machinery, tooling, gaging etc...nope, it meant share price went from $17-$97 overnight. People got rich, people went to jail for insider trading, nothing for the shop was purchased, and Colt filed bankruptcy. 1985ish, big strike, production continued despite lack of experienced help. 2016, job offer as QE, interview just didn't feel right, declined the offer.
Nobody's dancing on Colt's grave (that Colt dig for itself as the above post said). Many firearm historians will say that Colt is the perpetual sickman of the industry ever since old Sam passed away.

I'm no historian, and I only get to know Colt from my modest collection of a Python, a Detective Special, an Officer Model and a Woodsman. They are all well-made, pleasant to shoot and easy on the eyes. I don’t think you’ll find a gun guy that doesn’t like Colt products or even the company. Maybe a little schadenfreude because we feel ignored as Colt chase .gov and .mil contracts, but we’ll all be just as happy if they can make great products again and turn the company profitable.
 

strangenh

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I tried a 686 that had the same advancing issue. Hand slipped when dirty *(yeah, yeah)* - combination of tight tolerances, dirt, and loose tolerance on the hand. Happens.

So after watching that video and thinking, man, somewhere in there you either need a video editor or some Geritol (and I'm not that far off the guy's age!), what I'd like to know is - yes, the trigger is different - and yes, you can randomly gush about it but is the fraggin' trigger BETTER than the older Pythons in DA? I mean, hello, actual Y/N opinion, please?
 
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They're about all we have left in Ct. Colt and Standard. This state is poison for anything regarding firearms. Glad June4th realizes no one is dancing on their grave. I just get saddened when leeches suck the vibrancy out of a once great manufacturer. Saw the same sadness at Winchester when I was recruited for a position there about 30 years back. Huge places, virtually empty, looking more like dungeons than a modern mfg. facility. I went into turbines, lights are brighter, machines are newer.
 
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Youtube again...GoldenWebb..."Colts reply to my defective python"....reply by instagram, as 6 minutes in, this kid said nobody picked up the phone.
 

TrashcanDan

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So would that be considered over travel or under travel?
Are the innards a different design from how they were made back in the 90's?
Is that a one-off incident or is common with the new production run?
 

Lsgun1

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Doesn't seem wide spread from what I can see. If it turns out to be I'm sure in the coming months of more releasing that it will be dealt with.
 

67ray

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But Colt's not exactly overflowing with cash and I'm not surprised they took the easy road instead of reproducing a largely handmade gun. Look at the new 1908 they did a few years ago--finish and quality issues despite a high price.
Colt didn't make the new 1908 it was licensed out to another manufacturer US Armament Corp
Facts matter
 
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Doesn't seem wide spread from what I can see. If it turns out to be I'm sure in the coming months of more releasing that it will be dealt with.
We're talking about a gun released to the public on 1/1 and getting into peoples' hands around 1/14. This is still in the early adoption/clearing out the bugs phase. Let's see what people are saying by March, April.
 

Sweeney

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The solution is, most likely, either a tweaking of tolerances between the interacting components of the 'hand' mechanism and/or more deliberate de-burring. I'd gladly take one of these horribly defective guns (at a fraction of the cost) and spend the 5 minutes to correct it.
 

Parker Duofold

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I'd still like to buy one of the new Pythons if they can get the issues they have under control. That said, I was at a gun show here yesterday in South Carolina and saw a beautiful 4" blued Python circa 1965 NIB "unfired" with the box and all of the original stuff. Looking at it, I honestly think it had only been fired at the factory. Asking price was $3000. It was more than I would have wanted to spend but that blued finish was fantastic!
 

fencer

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This was predicable, and actually predicted by multiple writers who said they'd never bring the Python back, because the skilled workforce who created the original version have been retired for a long time.
I know.. and I would never take anything away from the guys that used to work at Colt and did so much of the work by hand, but FFS, in today's world of modern manufacturing, computer design, 3-D modelling and all the technology at their disposal, these issues really are inexcusable. No one expected the new Python to be as great as the virtually hand made, hand polished beauties of the past, but I expected them to work.
I figured there might be some issues reported like sights loosing up, or polishing that looked a little rough, or diminished accuracy. But I didn't think they would ship a bunch of literal garbage that would fail to function. Like the well fed redneck whose voice I can stand, in the youtube video said, even the $300 POS Taurus revolvers go boom when you pull the trigger.
They could have, for all intents and purposes, straight up copied the S&W internals, and produced a revolver that worked. Hickock 45 pointed out the slight differences in the new revolvers, but nothing that was a non starter or deal breaker. Poorly made internals are a deal breaker.
I am so disappointed, but I should be used to that by now with Colt. I was encouraged because it seems they got their shit together with the current 1911's. On the whole, they are much better than what they were spitting out 15-20 years ago, when you bought a new Colt 1911 and sent it directly to a gunsmith for a reliability service.
I have wanted a Python for a long time now, but just couldn't justify spending $2500 plus for a revolver that was 40 plus years old and I wouldn't shoot the shit out of it because of the guns value. But I always figured that once I got the kids through college, I would add one to the collection. When they announced the re-release I thought "Cool, I will wait until they are out a year and the price drops a little, then buy one I can really enjoy" But noooo... the motards at Colt released $1500 paper weights.

Colt has been teetering on the brink of disaster for a long time. You would have thought that no matter what they had to do, they would have made it a priority to make sure that the first 5000 Pythons they made, did not get sent back. Nope, not Colt. Dumbasses. And this isn't the type of issue that was not caused by a couple of people that work there. This is a leadership and management fiasco, created by suits who made piss poor decisions. What a shame.
 

Zappa

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It's disappointing that Colt screwed the pooch on their top-of-the line revolver.
They reintroduced the Cobra a few years ago, at less than half the price of their current Python, and I haven't heard of any problems with it. So how did the manage to botch this one ???
 

Varmint

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This was predicable, and actually predicted by multiple writers who said they'd never bring the Python back, because the skilled workforce who created the original version have been retired for a long time.
we can land spacecrafts on Mars. Is it that hard to make a revolver? Friggin Taurus can do it.
 

strangenh

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It's disappointing that Colt screwed the pooch on their top-of-the line revolver.
They reintroduced the Cobra a few years ago, at less than half the price of their current Python, and I haven't heard of any problems with it. So how did the manage to botch this one ???
I suspect they were trying to make the tolerances too tight on this one, without the hand fitting/adjusting. CNC encourages that, but it also means a little dirt in there can really bind it up. The wrong combo of "meeting tolerances" in each part and... you get a sort of lemon. Depending on design, it can bind hard or the hand can slip. Like I said, I tried a 686 that was just like that - very tight, but because of that it would bind up when dirty and the hand would skip... click! - and also tried a 617 that was so tight, it would bind up hard on fired Minimag brass (but not on SV). It happens. Doesn't surprise me on new designs just rolling out. I bet there will be quite a market for smiths to give these a "spa treatment" the same way some lever actions are commonly sent for slicking up. I also bet Colt gets on the stick and starts parts matching based on tolerance ranges.
 
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This was predicable, and actually predicted by multiple writers who said they'd never bring the Python back, because the skilled workforce who created the original version have been retired for a long time.
They're not making these new Pythons the same way they made the old Pythons, this has nothing to do with not having the skilled employees they had 20, 30, 40 years ago, it's teething issues with a new gun and a new design. If the same issues are still present in guns 6 months from now, then there's issues with the design or Colt's production quality.
 
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I can't tell anyone what the issue is with the Pythons, but what I do know is that more than just Hickok is having issues with them and I'm sure over the next few weeks, especially after tax refunds come in, we'll know for sure just how widespread the issues are. I also know that this probably wasn't an issue of short stroking the trigger because I find it hard to believe Hickok would do that given how many revolvers he owns and has shot.

So, the likelihood is that it's an issue with either the hands were not heat treated properly or the hand springs are not working properly. I had an NAA mini revolver that I was dorking around with one time spinning the cylinder while holding the hammer halfway between full cock and at rest and the tiny spring for the hand popped out of a groove behind the hand and caused the hand to not rotate the cylinder. I tried to fix it and would get it to work at times, then it would fail again, but I could rotate the cylinder manually until the bolt stop would lock the cylinder in place and shoot it.

That got sent to NAA and was promptly fixed, so hopefully Colt does the same for their customers. It's not a surprise to me that a new design is having teething issues out of the gate, but at least Colt will get these right, unlike Remington with their 9mm pistols a few years ago.
 

KBCraig

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They're not making these new Pythons the same way they made the old Pythons, this has nothing to do with not having the skilled employees they had 20, 30, 40 years ago, it's teething issues with a new gun and a new design. If the same issues are still present in guns 6 months from now, then there's issues with the design or Colt's production quality.
So, it's not a Python, except in name only.

How many months of bumps, hiccups, complaints, and bad reviews did the real Python have in 1955 before they started shipping a gun that actually worked?
 
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So, it's not a Python, except in name only.

How many months of bumps, hiccups, complaints, and bad reviews did the real Python have in 1955 before they started shipping a gun that actually worked?
Look at it like a Gen 2 Python. The changes made internally were made to make the manufacturing easier and less costly to reduce the price. To me the draw of a Python was always the way it looked, as to how they felt IDK. I've heard the old ones go out of time quick compared to other revolvers, but they should go out of time the first day at the range.

I can't answer the last one, but given Colt probably has a sizeable parts inventory, they'll go thru those before they get new parts that are up to spec to be put into the Pythons.
 
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