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My friend the 'Doc' has passed, medic 2/12th, 25th Infantry Div. Vietnam

Rat187

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The 'Doc' was a 7th Day Adventist and could have taken the conscientious objector option, but was drafted and decided to serve his fellow man in Vietnam. Doc cloaked the dying with his huge heart, and the men he treated went to meet their maker at peace. The Doc never carried a weapon because of his Christ centered beliefs, won the Silver Star and 2 Purple Hearts, and 3 Bronze Stars for Valor.

Man a tough one for me...Thanks All
 
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Rat187

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One of his troops he treated, from the Doc's obituary:

"I am honored and blessed to have known Doc. He was indeed a blessing in my life, and I will miss him dearly. Please accept my sincere condolences, Rosemary and your family. It was an honor to have served alongside Doc in Vietnam in 1968 with the 25th Infantry Division 2/12 Infantry Brigade 1st Platoon. Doc patched me up twice while wounded during battles. When I was infected with jungle rot, Doc was there to cure me. Doc has been there for me in the battles of Vietnam and the struggles I had returning to society. His guidance and sincerity encouraged me to seek medical assistance in 2000 at the VA Medical Center. It saved my life!
An unforgettable memory I have of Doc was when he earned the Silver Star for his actions on April 17, 1968. I witness his valor in combat. We loaded the Dust Off with our KIA's and WIA's when we came under machine gunfire. Suddenly the Dust Off took off the ground. Approximately 10 feet above the ground Doc and I decided to bail out from the Dust off. Under fire, we managed to land and search ourselves for possible gunshot wounds to our bodies. After we determined that we were okay, we immediately search for more KIA's and WIA's. After the battle, we returned to the base camp of Dau Tieng for the burial of the fallen soldiers. Simultaneously, a troop thrust the KIA's rifles into the ground and placed their helmets on top of them, creating a long line formation. We searched for a trumpet player. Unable to find a trumpet player, Doc picked up the trumpet and began to play Taps from his heart. The memory of April 17, 1968, had haunted us daily, but we helped each other to cope. His courageous acts of nobility to visit the fallen soldier's relatives who served alongside him were admirable and a classic example of the type of person Doc exemplified: A Hero. Kenneth Frederick Blakely was not only my DOC but my hero as well. May God give him eternal rest and the family the strength to bear the great pain. "

Marty Martinez
Vietnam 1968
 

HorizontalHunter

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One of his troops he treated, from the Doc's obituary:

"I am honored and blessed to have known Doc. He was indeed a blessing in my life, and I will miss him dearly. Please accept my sincere condolences, Rosemary and your family. It was an honor to have served alongside Doc in Vietnam in 1968 with the 25th Infantry Division 2/12 Infantry Brigade 1st Platoon. Doc patched me up twice while wounded during battles. When I was infected with jungle rot, Doc was there to cure me. Doc has been there for me in the battles of Vietnam and the struggles I had returning to society. His guidance and sincerity encouraged me to seek medical assistance in 2000 at the VA Medical Center. It saved my life!
An unforgettable memory I have of Doc was when he earned the Silver Star for his actions on April 17, 1968. I witness his valor in combat. We loaded the Dust Off with our KIA's and WIA's when we came under machine gunfire. Suddenly the Dust Off took off the ground. Approximately 10 feet above the ground Doc and I decided to bail out from the Dust off. Under fire, we managed to land and search ourselves for possible gunshot wounds to our bodies. After we determined that we were okay, we immediately search for more KIA's and WIA's. After the battle, we returned to the base camp of Dau Tieng for the burial of the fallen soldiers. Simultaneously, a troop thrust the KIA's rifles into the ground and placed their helmets on top of them, creating a long line formation. We searched for a trumpet player. Unable to find a trumpet player, Doc picked up the trumpet and began to play Taps from his heart. The memory of April 17, 1968, had haunted us daily, but we helped each other to cope. His courageous acts of nobility to visit the fallen soldier's relatives who served alongside him were admirable and a classic example of the type of person Doc exemplified: A Hero. Kenneth Frederick Blakely was not only my DOC but my hero as well. May God give him eternal rest and the family the strength to bear the great pain. "

Marty Martinez
Vietnam 1968

When people like Doc pass the world is surely a lesser place.

Bob
 
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