More police protecting and serving

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There's a reason now SOP for cops is to handcuff you behind your back right away when you're 'being detained' and they just want to talk to you. How can you annoy a cop by recording the interaction if your hands are bound behind your back? A lot of LEO hate it when you pull the 'what...crime... am i being suspected of committing, massa?' Don't assert your rights, do whatever the LEO tells you to do, dirty your knees, and you stand the biggest chance of staying alive.
 

appraiser

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A Boston police officer, now suspended from duty, has been accused of traveling to the Lincoln-Woodstock area to exchange drugs for sex, according to details that have emerged since police filed drug possession charges against him early last year.
The officer — Andrew L. Johnson, 55, of Chestnut Hill, Mass. — faces two felony charges alleging possession of methamphetamine and amphetamine.
According to papers filed in Grafton County Superior Court, the drugs were among some 110 pills that police found when they obtained a warrant to search Johnson’s bags, after they answered a call about a fight at his room at the Inn 32 in North Woodstock in January 2021.

According to court records, police found two women crying and sitting in their car at the hotel parking lot when they answered the call.
One told police she met Johnson a few years earlier when he called a local taxi company and said he was looking for a good time.
Amanda Dinger told police she worked for the company and started having sex with Johnson in exchange for drugs; he visited the area multiple times to exchange drugs for sex.
She also claimed Johnson was supplying drugs to an area businessman.
The incident unfolded on Jan. 23, 2021, when Johnson met Dinger and another woman at the Pemi Public House that night and then returned to his hotel room.
Dinger told police that Johnson tried to force himself on her when the other woman was in the shower. The other woman got out of the shower, jumped on Johnson’s back and he punched her, Dinger said.
Johnson told police they were “fooling around” when he found Dinger going through his jeans and taking $200. The woman got Johnson in a headlock, and Johnson told police the two ran out of his room with his cell phone and the $200.
Dinger let police search her car. They found Johnson’s cell phone and a small amount of what appeared to be cocaine, but no $200. They arrested Dinger on a drug possession charge.

Dinger had scratch marks on her face and chest, and her friend had a mark on her face that was developing to a bruise.
When police answered the call at the hotel, Johnson told them he was an internal affairs investigator with Boston police. According to Boston police, he was placed on leave with pay in January 2021, then suspended without pay on Aug. 2, 2021.
Boston police spokesman Sgt. John Boyle said a suspension occurs when a police officer is indicted for a crime.
The search ended up netting 112 pills. Ten pills tested positive for methamphetamine, and police also found about a gram of the drug in a bag, according to court papers.
They also found 48 pills described as amphetamine.
The information was disclosed in court papers filed within the last month to throw out the search.
Johnson’s attorney, Leonard Harden, claims police overstepped their authority when they shined flashlights on the bags in a dark room and relied on the few pills they saw to justify a warrant.
He also cited them for relying on Dinger for information despite her obvious intoxication. And they had no reason to call in a police dog to sniff out the bags for drugs, Harden wrote.
The prosecution in the case is being handled by the office of Attorney General John Formella.
Jesse O’Neill, an assistant New Hampshire attorney general, said state police requested that his office handle the case.
“I can’t say why,” O’Neill said. “The referral was made to us, and we accepted it.”
 

KBCraig

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How can the Dr. be charged with resisting arrest when the cop never said he was under arrest?

I get why the cop was nervous about the guy coming at him, but everything else seems an over reaction
Like @42! said, they don't have to say the words.

It's basic 4A case law. Any time a reasonable person feels they are not free to leave, they are "seized". Semantics about "arrested", "detained", "in custody", etc., are BS -- it's all the same for purposes of 4A.

In a traffic stop situation, justified or not, that seizure happens the moment the flashing lights go on, and doesn't end until the motorist is released.

I don't say any of this to justify the cop, who was a total a**h***. I just want people to remember that playing word games with arrested/detained/stopped/custody is nonsense. And I mean people on both sides of the interaction!
 

KBCraig

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A Boston police officer, now suspended from duty, has been accused of traveling to the Lincoln-Woodstock area to exchange drugs for sex, according to details that have emerged since police filed drug possession charges against him early last year.
The officer — Andrew L. Johnson, 55, of Chestnut Hill, Mass. — faces two felony charges alleging possession of methamphetamine and amphetamine.
According to papers filed in Grafton County Superior Court, the drugs were among some 110 pills that police found when they obtained a warrant to search Johnson’s bags, after they answered a call about a fight at his room at the Inn 32 in North Woodstock in January 2021.

According to court records, police found two women crying and sitting in their car at the hotel parking lot when they answered the call.
One told police she met Johnson a few years earlier when he called a local taxi company and said he was looking for a good time.
Amanda Dinger told police she worked for the company and started having sex with Johnson in exchange for drugs; he visited the area multiple times to exchange drugs for sex.
She also claimed Johnson was supplying drugs to an area businessman.
The incident unfolded on Jan. 23, 2021, when Johnson met Dinger and another woman at the Pemi Public House that night and then returned to his hotel room.
Dinger told police that Johnson tried to force himself on her when the other woman was in the shower. The other woman got out of the shower, jumped on Johnson’s back and he punched her, Dinger said.
Johnson told police they were “fooling around” when he found Dinger going through his jeans and taking $200. The woman got Johnson in a headlock, and Johnson told police the two ran out of his room with his cell phone and the $200.
Dinger let police search her car. They found Johnson’s cell phone and a small amount of what appeared to be cocaine, but no $200. They arrested Dinger on a drug possession charge.

Dinger had scratch marks on her face and chest, and her friend had a mark on her face that was developing to a bruise.
When police answered the call at the hotel, Johnson told them he was an internal affairs investigator with Boston police. According to Boston police, he was placed on leave with pay in January 2021, then suspended without pay on Aug. 2, 2021.
Boston police spokesman Sgt. John Boyle said a suspension occurs when a police officer is indicted for a crime.
The search ended up netting 112 pills. Ten pills tested positive for methamphetamine, and police also found about a gram of the drug in a bag, according to court papers.
They also found 48 pills described as amphetamine.
The information was disclosed in court papers filed within the last month to throw out the search.
Johnson’s attorney, Leonard Harden, claims police overstepped their authority when they shined flashlights on the bags in a dark room and relied on the few pills they saw to justify a warrant.
He also cited them for relying on Dinger for information despite her obvious intoxication. And they had no reason to call in a police dog to sniff out the bags for drugs, Harden wrote.
The prosecution in the case is being handled by the office of Attorney General John Formella.
Jesse O’Neill, an assistant New Hampshire attorney general, said state police requested that his office handle the case.
“I can’t say why,” O’Neill said. “The referral was made to us, and we accepted it.”

Sounds like a Moe's Tavern routine: "Amanda Dinger? I'm looking for Amanda Dinger!"

I lol'd at the part where the woman got him in a headlock.

My daughter and her husband live above the Pemi Pub, and Inn 32 is right down the street. Woodstock Inn is in between; this is tourism central, not exactly a shady area.
 
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Like @42! said, they don't have to say the words.

It's basic 4A case law. Any time a reasonable person feels they are not free to leave, they are "seized". Semantics about "arrested", "detained", "in custody", etc., are BS -- it's all the same for purposes of 4A.

In a traffic stop situation, justified or not, that seizure happens the moment the flashing lights go on, and doesn't end until the motorist is released.

I don't say any of this to justify the cop, who was a total a**h***. I just want people to remember that playing word games with arrested/detained/stopped/custody is nonsense. And I mean people on both sides of the interaction!

Yes and no. The courts have ruled that different standards apply to temporary (investigative) detentions and traffic stops than arrests. Being detained and not free to leave at a traffic stop has a different standard than arresting him. Now I'd argue the stop wasn't lawful in the first place, but even if it was, he wasn't trying to leave the stop. Police cannot just handcuff everyone at traffic stops because they want to. Additional factors must exist.

A seizure within the meaning of the 4A can occur without the person being arrested. And a person can be handcuffed without it constituting an arrest. So it's more than just semantics.

For example, if a cop walks up to you and says "hey, let's talk for a minute". And you stay and talk. That's just a consensual encounter that doesn't implicate the 4A. A traffic stop or investigatory detention is a seizure and does implicate the 4A, and the standard is reasonable suspicion. An arrest requires probable cause, and again, obviously implicates the 4A.

To make matters even more murky, courts have ruled that handcuffing someone, even if the cop tells that person they are under arrest, doesn't necessarily constitute an arrest, so figure that shit out.
 

KBCraig

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Yes and no. The courts have ruled that different standards apply to temporary (investigative) detentions and traffic stops than arrests. Being detained and not free to leave at a traffic stop has a different standard than arresting him. Now I'd argue the stop wasn't lawful in the first place, but even if it was, he wasn't trying to leave the stop. Police cannot just handcuff everyone at traffic stops because they want to. Additional factors must exist.

A seizure within the meaning of the 4A can occur without the person being arrested. And a person can be handcuffed without it constituting an arrest. So it's more than just semantics.

For example, if a cop walks up to you and says "hey, let's talk for a minute". And you stay and talk. That's just a consensual encounter that doesn't implicate the 4A. A traffic stop or investigatory detention is a seizure and does implicate the 4A, and the standard is reasonable suspicion. An arrest requires probable cause, and again, obviously implicates the 4A.

To make matters even more murky, courts have ruled that handcuffing someone, even if the cop tells that person they are under arrest, doesn't necessarily constitute an arrest, so figure that shit out.
You said what I said, while disagreeing with what I said.

If you reasonably believe you're not free to leave, you've been seized. While the courts apply various levels of "seized", all those levels still constitute being seized.

The Terry Stop is seen by most police as being a limitation on their authority. In reality, it created an exception to 4A, by saying it's okay to violate the 4th if you have a good reason.

I don't think it's ever okay to violate 4A, or 5A, or 6A, or 8A, or 1A, or 2A.
 

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Five times since last May, sheriff's deputies in Kansas and California have stopped armored cars operated by Empyreal Logistics, a Pennsylvania-based company that serves marijuana businesses and financial institutions that work with them. The cops made off with cash after three of those stops, seizing a total of $1.2 million, but did not issue any citations or file any criminal charges, which are not necessary to confiscate property through civil forfeiture. That process allows police to pad their budgets by seizing assets they allege are connected to criminal activity, even when the owner is never charged, let alone convicted.

 

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Five times since last May, sheriff's deputies in Kansas and California have stopped armored cars operated by Empyreal Logistics, a Pennsylvania-based company that serves marijuana businesses and financial institutions that work with them. The cops made off with cash after three of those stops, seizing a total of $1.2 million, but did not issue any citations or file any criminal charges, which are not necessary to confiscate property through civil forfeiture. That process allows police to pad their budgets by seizing assets they allege are connected to criminal activity, even when the owner is never charged, let alone convicted.

Good read.
Enabled by the Feds’ continuing 85% equitable sharing. So corrupt.

I’m not surprised that a Kansas sheriff would do this given that states legal climate.

California is surprising. Isn’t recreational legal there? It looks like there are CA state laws that explicitly prohibit. Quite brazen.
 

67ray

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Five times since last May, sheriff's deputies in Kansas and California have stopped armored cars operated by Empyreal Logistics, a Pennsylvania-based company that serves marijuana businesses and financial institutions that work with them. The cops made off with cash after three of those stops, seizing a total of $1.2 million, but did not issue any citations or file any criminal charges, which are not necessary to confiscate property through civil forfeiture. That process allows police to pad their budgets by seizing assets they allege are connected to criminal activity, even when the owner is never charged, let alone convicted.


Those fockers need to do two things:
1. Train drivers tro STFU - sorry I do not wish to talk to you officer
2. Run decoy vans every once in a while and confuse LE
 

Choctaw

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Good read.
Enabled by the Feds’ continuing 85% equitable sharing. So corrupt.

I’m not surprised that a Kansas sheriff would do this given that states legal climate.

California is surprising. Isn’t recreational legal there? It looks like there are CA state laws that explicitly prohibit. Quite brazen.
It also gives people ideas about how to stop and rob an armored car operated by Empyreal Logistics without getting any resistance or police notification. It wouldn't cost much to make a couple of fake sheriff vehicles and uniforms. $1.2 mil for three stops is a good return on your investment.

Wouldn't that be hilarious. Real deputies stop the armored car to find it has already been robbed by the fake sheriff's department.
 

Chevy 2 65

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There's a reason now SOP for cops is to handcuff you behind your back right away when you're 'being detained' and they just want to talk to you. How can you annoy a cop by recording the interaction if your hands are bound behind your back? A lot of LEO hate it when you pull the 'what...crime... am i being suspected of committing, massa?' Don't assert your rights, do whatever the LEO tells you to do, dirty your knees, and you stand the biggest chance of staying alive.
This is all you need to do.

stfu.gif
 

caboose84

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I’m not surprised that a Kansas sheriff would do this given that states legal climate.

When Colorado first legalized recreational weed in 2014, both Kansas and Nebraska cops started stopping vehicles with Colorado plates and conducting drug searches simply based on the fact the vehicles were from Colorado. As I recall they got slapped down pretty quickly for it, but certainly not before a bunch of innocent folks got harassed for no reason.
 
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Junior314

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Imagine how many times you've been asleep and a loud noise has not woken you up, or you've been dreaming and the noise gets integrated into your dream.

This running and gunning bullshit needs to stop.

Pick up the book “Warrior Cop”. I finished it earlier this year. Outlines dozens of issues with police raids among other things.
 

67ray

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Read this article. Seriously. Out of control.

 

vicorjh

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Read this article. Seriously. Out of control.


Brookside, AL. Population of 1217 in 2019:

1642718092916.png
 

xtry51

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Read this article. Seriously. Out of control.


Seriously that town needs to be gutted and hung from trees.
 
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Brookside, AL. Population of 1217 in 2019:

View attachment 567116

That bearcat tank thing is at least marked, unlike all their other vehicles. Blacked out vehicles and black uniforms without markings. Literally the mafia running a racket.

See, if the FBI had any legitimacy whatsoever, the mayor and entire police department would be indicted. But of course we know they have none.
 

KBCraig

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View: https://mobile.twitter.com/richardmetzler/status/1483903179007819776


I'm sure that review board will clear things right up. Vegas Metro has an awesome record when it comes to police shooting innocent people.

 

GM-GUY

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A carry over from the Kung-Flu thread : when you arrest a 9 year old over a vaccination card/passport #DefundthePolice becomes more and more likely (as it should). Further, that the cops were able to do it unopposed is a sad state of affairs that I hope will change
 

breds2k

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Imagine how many times you've been asleep and a loud noise has not woken you up, or you've been dreaming and the noise gets integrated into your dream.

This running and gunning bullshit needs to stop.
you guys need to actually read the article and have a clue here before bashing the cops. Apartment was believed to have a murder suspect inside, they clearly said "police department search warrant" 4-6 times after breaking the window, and the first guy through the door takes 2 rounds to the chest immediately, one to each arm and one in the thigh... How did the police do anything wrong here? Turns out the guy they wanted wasnt there, but the media makes it seem like they kicked in the right door, it was the wrong door wrong shit bag.
 

Junior314

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you guys need to actually read the article and have a clue here before bashing the cops. Apartment was believed to have a murder suspect inside, they clearly said "police department search warrant" 4-6 times after breaking the window, and the first guy through the door takes 2 rounds to the chest immediately, one to each arm and one in the thigh... How did the police do anything wrong here? Turns out the guy they wanted wasnt there, but the media makes it seem like they kicked in the right door, it was the wrong door wrong shit bag.

90% of the time a raid can be avoided by picking up someone “on the street” as opposed to kicking in doors. You illustrate exactly that. They kicked in the door to find someone that wasn’t there and a gunfight ensued.

ETA: Ohh and they killed a guy.
 
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you guys need to actually read the article and have a clue here before bashing the cops. Apartment was believed to have a murder suspect inside, they clearly said "police department search warrant" 4-6 times after breaking the window, and the first guy through the door takes 2 rounds to the chest immediately, one to each arm and one in the thigh... How did the police do anything wrong here? Turns out the guy they wanted wasnt there, but the media makes it seem like they kicked in the right door, it was the wrong door wrong shit bag.

Umm police were basically breaking and entering. Broke into a house of an American citizen. Castle doctrine should apply don't ya think. What crime in progress were they after??
 
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