More on DNA not your own if you use the test, post 74 Ancestry Fights The US Govt As Feds Try To Grab DNA Data

Buck F

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Yes.....and any one tangentially related to you (cousins, nieces, etc). The government is actively (and aggressively) using databases like these for law enforcement. Just ask the Golden State Killer:

The Golden State Killer Is Tracked Through a Thicket of DNA, and Experts Shudder

I remember when this happened...this was before my sister had it done...I tried to tell her the implications of what she wanted to do and sent her the article where this happened...she told me to take my tin foil hat off. Yup...she's stupid. She has always lived for the moment and has made some pretty bad life decisions over the years...but she won't listen to reason.
This stuff is getting scary, getting nailed via DNA submitted by someone you may not even know (if you’re adopted, have a sibling/kid you don’t know about, etc.) even with GED Match and others changing their privacy policies it’s like the internet, once you hit SEND you can never completely erase it. Who knows what the technological/political/societal factors will be a decade from now, or two decades from now. And people actively allowing their DNA to be accessed by LEO via these genealogy services, frigan scary.

Police were cracking cold cases with a DNA website. Then the fine print changed.
 

PaulR

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I learned recently that my mother did one of those geneology(sp) tests to find out her ancestry (she says she was adopted). So, I guess if they really want me, they got me. :(:(
 

M1911

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I learned recently that my mother did one of those geneology(sp) tests to find out her ancestry (she says she was adopted). So, I guess if they really want me, they got me. :(:(
No. It depends upon which site. Most do not provide open access.
 

M1911

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That has absolutely nothing to do with the personal genetics companies and is in no way related to their data protections.

I do understand people’s concerns with being identified by familial DNA. But you folks are seriously misunderstanding where the risk is coming from.

The Golden State Killer was identified through using the open source genealogy website GEDMatch. This web site is open source and can be searched without a warrant. People upload their DNA data to GEDMatch. If one of your relatives uploads their DNA data to GEDMatch, then if law enforcement comes across your DNA (but don’t know who it matches to), they may be able to do a familial match to your relative. That would then allow them to identify a small number of people who might belong to the unknown sample. Then, through surveillance or court order, they get a sample of your DNA and match it to the unknown sample.

23andme and other companies, in contrast, will only release data if they receive a court order. So the police would have to have a pretty good case that the unknown sample is yours before they could get your profile from 23andme. And if they had that good a case, they would simply get a warrant that allows them to get a sample of your DNA (spit kit) and test it themselves.

The chance of your DNA data getting out from a company like 23andme (and being admissible in court) via a hack is low. It is more likely that a relative uploads their profile to an open source database and you are identified via a familial match.

No, I have not and likely will not get a DNA profile performed at 23andme (or one of their competitors). But we should focus our paranoia in more likely directions.
 

MisterHappy

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My point is that ANYTHING, once disclosed, is going to come out, somewhere, somewhen.

With the increasing power of digitization, old stuff will be scanned, and then it will be in the aether.

I know that this is not the top worry...it was intended to be a more-or-less sarcastic NES post, with a touch of paranoia.
 

MuzzleDiscipline

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Identifying criminals is the least and last problem I have with DNA databases.

Anyone fearing their past criminal behavior will be revealed by DNA should be afraid. Pandora's box was opened when Eve decided the serpent could be right. The earth has been in a steady state of decline ever since. The box only closes when the earth ends.

Nothing under the sun is new. How do you think folks felt when fingerprints first developed as forensic evidence?

Share it voluntarily or not. They either have it or can get it easily enough. Your LTC came at the cost of revealing your fingerprints to a database.

This issue is similar to Edward(should be executed for treason)Snowden's revelations of stuff which was obvious to those already woke but as finally becoming elderly has taught me every generation has to rediscover this stuff for themselves and have the opportunity to choose their own response. Humanity always stands one generation from living in caves.
 

timbo

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So...what did you do?
Not much I could do. I have nothing to hide (a favorite mantra of some people on here) but what if down the road, rights become crimes (more than some already have become)...a lot of us in this boat could suddenly be on the wrong side of the law.
 

AHM

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This stuff is getting scary, getting nailed via DNA submitted by someone you may not even know (if you’re adopted, have a sibling/kid you don’t know about, etc.) ...
Cheer up.
Before Granny Warren stupidly submitted to a DNA test,
Howie Carr had a standing beg for someone to get him a sample.
One listener asked her for an autograph while her hands were full,
and she held the pen cap in her mouth.
Regrettably there was too little spittle to get a reading.

But as police depend more and more on DNA,
people will start trading in stolen genes.

Be a shame if Antifa spit on some based counterprotester
and it ended up dabbed at a murder scene...
 

mikeyp

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Ancestry has revealed it is fighting the U.S. government over an order to hand over DNA data. This is only the second-known case in which the leading family history company has been served with a warrant demanding genetic information on its users.

In a transparency report released last week, the genealogy website revealed that because of “jurisdictional” issues, it decided not to comply with the single request for DNA data it received in 2019. It shows how, whilst a privacy hot potato, genetic data from such companies isn’t as crucial to law enforcement as many had predicted it would become. Not yet, anyway.

Previously, Ancestry.com rivals have been told to hand over data to law enforcement.

GEDmatch was raided for data on a number of occasions, according to various media reports. In one case, the company handed over information that helped the police track down the so-called Golden State Killer, Joseph James DeAngelo, in 2018. Late last year, the New York Times reported on a claim from a Florida-based police officer that they’d also managed to acquire a warrant to search GEDmatch’s database.

Outside of DNA data, Ancestry said it received nine valid law enforcement requests for user information, providing customer details in six. Just one related to DNA, the other eight regarded credit card misuse, fraud and identity theft.

“Ancestry received one request seeking access to Ancestry’s DNA database through a search warrant. Ancestry challenged the warrant on jurisdictional grounds and did not provide any customer data in response,” the company wrote.

“Ancestry also refused numerous inquiries on the basis that the requestor failed to obtain the appropriate legal process.”

Genetic data can link you to all manner of people, including criminals, hence why there’s such concern over keeping it private. But when people share their DNA data with the likes of Ancestry and 23andme, they may not be aware that governments can legally demand it be handed over to police investigators.

But government requests for Ancestry data appear to be decreasing, with 10 coming in 2018, none of them for genetic information. That was down from 34 in 2017 when, again, no genetic data was demanded.

Prior to the order in 2019, Ancestry has complied with just one request for DNA information, in 2014, when a search warrant ordered the company to identity a person based on a DNA sample that had previously been made public.
 

Reptile

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Ancestry has revealed it is fighting the U.S. government over an order to hand over DNA data. This is only the second-known case in which the leading family history company has been served with a warrant demanding genetic information on its users.

In a transparency report released last week, the genealogy website revealed that because of “jurisdictional” issues, it decided not to comply with the single request for DNA data it received in 2019. It shows how, whilst a privacy hot potato, genetic data from such companies isn’t as crucial to law enforcement as many had predicted it would become. Not yet, anyway.

Previously, Ancestry.com rivals have been told to hand over data to law enforcement.

GEDmatch was raided for data on a number of occasions, according to various media reports. In one case, the company handed over information that helped the police track down the so-called Golden State Killer, Joseph James DeAngelo, in 2018. Late last year, the New York Times reported on a claim from a Florida-based police officer that they’d also managed to acquire a warrant to search GEDmatch’s database.

Outside of DNA data, Ancestry said it received nine valid law enforcement requests for user information, providing customer details in six. Just one related to DNA, the other eight regarded credit card misuse, fraud and identity theft.

“Ancestry received one request seeking access to Ancestry’s DNA database through a search warrant. Ancestry challenged the warrant on jurisdictional grounds and did not provide any customer data in response,” the company wrote.

“Ancestry also refused numerous inquiries on the basis that the requestor failed to obtain the appropriate legal process.”

Genetic data can link you to all manner of people, including criminals, hence why there’s such concern over keeping it private. But when people share their DNA data with the likes of Ancestry and 23andme, they may not be aware that governments can legally demand it be handed over to police investigators.

But government requests for Ancestry data appear to be decreasing, with 10 coming in 2018, none of them for genetic information. That was down from 34 in 2017 when, again, no genetic data was demanded.

Prior to the order in 2019, Ancestry has complied with just one request for DNA information, in 2014, when a search warrant ordered the company to identity a person based on a DNA sample that had previously been made public.
I think the genie is out of the bottle on this case.

"Conservative estimates indicate there are 200,000–400,000 untested rape kits in U.S. police departments, and large stockpiles of kits have been documented in over five dozen jurisdictions, sometimes totaling more than 10,000 untested rape kits in a single city."

I bet most of those rape kits would lead to a suspect.

It's only a matter of time before they get ID'd.

10 years from now, your google searches will be brought up from the past to tie you to a crime.
Every website you ever went to all tied to your IP, even if you use a VPN.
Not to mention your complete cell phone location history since you were a teen.
 

smokey-seven

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Sort of makes me want to get a blood sample from a wanted individual and file it to ancestry under my name and specifics but with a phony address. When the feds come for me, it will be one hell of a false arrest suit.



.
 

PennyPincher

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Sort of makes me want to get a blood sample from a wanted individual and file it to ancestry under my name and specifics but with a phony address. When the feds come for me, it will be one hell of a false arrest suit.



.
FYI, none of the DNA testing companies for genealogy use blood samples - spit or cheek swabs only.
 
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