More on DNA not your own if you use the test, post 74 Ancestry Fights The US Govt As Feds Try To Grab DNA Data

MachineHead

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This sounds amazing! I still don’t get the appeal of sending in a part of you to some lab. All under the guise of the “find out where you’re from!” line.
 

timbo

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So, my younger sister had a test done because, she's stupid. Can a DNA company deduce from her results what my results would be like as we share the same parents??

I did find out through her results that I have WAY more Native American blood (well, "1st Nation" because my Great Grandmother, full blooded Iroquois, came from Canada) than granny warren does
 

Broccoli Iglesias

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This sounds amazing! I still don’t get the appeal of sending in a part of you to some lab. All under the guise of the “find out where you’re from!” line.
That part is just stupid.

It is useful if your family has a history of some type of cancer, you can get tested to see if you too should be careful and take action now. I know a person who's mother had ovarian cancer, so she hurried, had kids and got everything removed because she had a high chance of also getting it.

If your family doesnt have a history of cancer or other diseases, then getting tested to find out if you might have a chance of getting something is plain stupid (from what I have been told by a few biologists and doctors). Apparently it is because the tests are not good when used in a generic way, they are good when targeting a specific disease.

My company now covers DNA testing, so I spoke with a few people about this and decided to not do it because it could cause more troubles than good. Not only by making me worry about stuff that might never happen, but also because it could potentially be used against me.
 

Broccoli Iglesias

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So, my younger sister had a test done because, she's stupid. Can a DNA company deduce from her results what my results would be like as we share the same parents??

I did find out through her results that I have WAY more Native American blood (well, "1st Nation" because my Great Grandmother, full blooded Iroquois, came from Canada) than granny warren does
Someone with more knowledge can correct me if I'm wrong, but I think you are fine because it is too generic.
 

rep308

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So, my younger sister had a test done because, she's stupid. Can a DNA company deduce from her results what my results would be like as we share the same parents??

I did find out through her results that I have WAY more Native American blood (well, "1st Nation" because my Great Grandmother, full blooded Iroquois, came from Canada) than granny warren does
If they have your sister's genome, they have 1/2 of yours. Plenty enough for police work. They trace your DNA to by a 50% match to your sister in the database and know it's you or another one brother of hers (Y chromosome rules out sisters)
 
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I’d also say. If you want to do anonymous selected sequencing of cancer risk genes. Then that’s ok. Not enough to tie it back to you. But the more you do, the higher the match rate to you.
 

peterk123

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This is just the beginning. My wife has been after me to do dna thing forever because she and the kids want to complete the family tree. I keep telling her no f'n way because it is just a matter of time until government gains access to it. I just sent her this article.

It is naive to think that this shit was not going to happen. That information is so valuable, probably worth billions once the database is large enough.
 

M1911

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I work in a biotech research lab. I’m a software guy, not a biologist, so my knowledge of the biotech stuff is fair at best, so take this with a grain of salt. My response is “meh”.

23andme doesn’t perform genome sequencing. Genome sequencing tries to sequence your entire genome. That is, it is an attempt to read out the entire string of 3 billion A’s, C’s, T’s, and G’s that make up your genome. But 23andme doesn’t do that because it is still too expensive.

23andme does array-based genotyping. That is, they have a chip that has an array of the complement of a bunch of genetic variations. They chop up your dna into fragments and wash them over the chip. If you have a particular variation, then a fragment with that variation binds to the chip at that location. This type of genotyping only tells you whether you have one of the variations on the chip. In contrast, whole genome sequencing will find all* your variations. Array-based genotyping is quick, cheap, and produces a manageable amount of data. Whole genome sequencing, in contrast, produces enormous amounts of data and requires very robust computational pipelines typically running in the cloud.

As for the data itself, making associations between genotype (that is, the presence of a variation) and a disease based solely on self-reported health data seems to me to be of dubious value. I hope GSK is not paying 23andme a lot to access this data.

There are a number of large scale biobank projects that are far more likely to produce useful results. These are creating very large cohorts, are using whole genome sequencing, AND they have access to medical records. Here in the US the All Of Us project is just starting with the goal of sequencing 1M people. The UK Biobank has recruited 500k donors.

As for the privacy issue, I expect that the agreement with GSK is giving them deidentified data and requiring them to not release the genotype data. I would be far more concerned with law enforcement gaining access to 23andme data than GSK data.

If I had done 23andme (I haven’t), this agreement wouldn’t get my panties in a twist.

* Yes, whole genome sequencing still doesn’t get the ENTIRE genome. Certain areas with large strings of repeats are still hard to sequence and align.
 
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M1911

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The thing about open source DNA banks is that you're f***ed anyway. They just need to find someone close to you.
Yea, but 23andme isn’t open source. I’m not saying there aren’t privacy concerns, but it is not like you can just troll through 23andme’s database at will.
 
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The thing about open source DNA banks is that you're f***ed anyway. They just need to find someone close to you.
Easy fix to that. Change the laws from protecting doctors and businesses to protecting people. Make it so people own their healthcare data and having it without their express written permission is a felony and having consent does not permit passing that data on to anyone but those listed in the consent.
 

Mountain

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The thing about open source DNA banks is that you're f***ed anyway. They just need to find someone close to you.
And every single person close to me would respond 'FU' for DNA. Even if I were related to an Obama Sin Ladin I would not provide DNA, and I doubt any family member would.
 

Choctaw

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If you have been active or reserve military after December 16th, 1991 they have your dna in their database.

"As its name suggests, the DNA Repository was initially conceived solely to identify the remains of service members. However, a small entry in the huge 2003 National Defense Authorization Act, “signed by President Bush on December 2, 2002, overrides Pentagon policy that the DNA samples be used almost solely to identity troops killed in combat,” and allows access to the Repository for law enforcement purposes."

http://councilforresponsiblegenetics.org/geneticprivacy/DNA_mil.html
 

Spanz

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So, my younger sister had a test done because, she's stupid. Can a DNA company deduce from her results what my results would be like as we share the same parents??

I did find out through her results that I have WAY more Native American blood (well, "1st Nation" because my Great Grandmother, full blooded Iroquois, came from Canada) than granny warren does
From what i hear, a LOT of people are finding out that they do NOT share the same two parents as their siblings have! They only share one. ;)
 
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M1911

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From what i hear, a LOT of people are finding out that they do NOT share the same two parents as their siblings have! They only share one. ;)
That’s been true since the start of genetic testing. The actual percentage is hard to tie down. I’ve read estimates of incorrect parentage ranging from 1-10%.
 
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