Miter Saw..... Choices?

nightpoison

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So im in the market for a miter saw. And wanted opinions.

For the moment ill be using it to cut up aluminum vslot rails, but long term ill be using for Aluminum and wood up to max 4x4 garden lumber. Will be doing some work on the shed and general wood cutting. I do have some plans to do some light wood working projects for around the house nothing professional but it's going to be used weekly to every other week.

I've always been a dewalt fan, but im leaning towards rigid for the warranty. I want to buy a good one, one and done but the budget makes out at $400.

So here r my questions.....
1) slider vs chop. I understand the space savings of the chop saw vs the slider and the increased cutting surface of the slider. Anything else that should be a consideration?

2) 10" or 12". I think this one is not really a question. Im thinking 10" as I don't think im going any bigger than 4x4 or 2x10 and I believe the 10" saw handles all that fine

3) brand. Have always had great luck with dewalt, but really like the idea of rigids lifetime warranty. I've looked at reviews and they appear on par if not better in some opinions to dewalt. Bosch isn't really in the budget.

4) new/used. Well if I go rigid new it is as that's the only way to get the warranty, but other brands aren't that cheap used. So wondering if its even worth risking used seeing how there's zero warranty.

5) table saw. So eventually I want a table saw as well, if I push past my $400 budget I can pick up the rigid table saw. Would it be better to grab a table saw first? I've used them in the past bit not alot.

6) any suggestions on discounts on these tools through retail stores im jot aware of. HD don't seem to do coupons or deals on these, been waiting awhile
 

Mass Predator

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1. CHOP SAFER/MORE VERS
2. 12" BIGGER IS BETTER
3. MAKITA PERSONAL PREF/EXPERIENCE
4. NEW BASED ON YOUR USAGE
5. CHOP FIRST/TABLE LATTER
 

PistolShooter

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I have owned a Rigid 12" sliding compound saw for a number of years. Great saw, but PITA if you are not just using it on a stand in a shop/garage. Way too heavy to cart around and use around the house. Given that I just purchased a 10" dewalt http://www.homedepot.com/p/DEWALT-15-Amp-10-in-Compound-Miter-Saw-DW713/100672239 to redo all the molding upstairs in my house. I got sick and tired of running in and out of the house to use the larger saw.

The sliding 12" is great for bigger projects but 9 times out of 10, the 10" does everything I need. I am probably going to sell one of my saws since I don't need both. Feel free to send me a PM if you have any other questions.
 

ASHDUMP

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I have a DeWalt compound mitre saw. owned it for 10 years with out any trouble. I used it every so often.

I have a bosch table saw for the exact same amount of time. I use that ever so often as well.

Both have served me well.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/DEWALT-1...l-Sliding-Compound-Miter-Saw-DWS780/202922350
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Bosch-15-Amp-10-in-Table-Saw-with-Gravity-Rise-Stand-4100-09/202242734

I will also tell you that I bought the Ridgid 6.5hp shop vac with stainless steel drum 10 years ago. I used that the most (all the time). Just the other day the motor went and it stopped working. I emailed and called Ridgid and they stepped me through the process of warranty. Two weeks later I got a brand new vac delivered to me in the mail. I couldn't believe it.

My next set of tools will be Ridgid because of that experience. http://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-16-gal-6-5-Peak-HP-Stainless-Steel-Wet-Dry-Vac-WD1956/100638347
 

gxx9sdb

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If you can afford the slider, go for it. I have found it near impossible to flip boards on my chop saw and have the cuts perfectly line up.
 
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I normally would not recommend a Craftsman power tool, but my company has had them all, from Dewalt to Bosch to Makita to Hitachi and by far my favorite is the Craftsman 12" double bevel sliding compound mitre saw. I have had it since 2004 and it has never failed me. I recommend you get a stand too unless you are going to attached it to a permanent bench. I have an adjustable portable stand where you can extend the arms and alter the elevation of each arm as well. It is a heavy combination though and is best moved with two people, though a strong person can handle it awkwardly himself.
 

1903Collector

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If your just using for home stuff, not everyday usage just about any slider will do I think. I have an 8 1/2" Hitatchi that I have had for years and for finish work it's great but not so much for the bigger stuff, when I worked in the trade almost every finish guy had this saw. I have a 7 1/4" Craftsman slider, that saw and a Paslode finsish gun doesn't get much more portable for small jobs.

The Rigid table saw is a good deal for the money IMHO, Generous table size and rip capacity, great fence for that class of saw and the stand in niffty. I wouldn't put a molding head cutter on it but for general purpose cuts and dadoing is't a good saw.
 
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dhuze

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For a miter saw buy a Hitachi. They are all in the same price bracket so buy a popular brand. Make sure you get a compound miter. I use one for construction. mine is a dual rail slide I use it all the time, it's 20 years old and still like new.

As for portable table saws you will never go wrong with a Mikita. I've had one for over 20 years. They are basically a Makita skill saw inverted with a table. I worked for a guy who ran his over with his truck, put pine sides on it and we used it for years after with no issues.
 

Asaltweapon

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I'm pretty sure 4X4 needs a 12" but I'm not 100% on that statement.

I have two older style Dewalt compound 12" sliders with Dewalt stands. Both are very good saws but the 12" is no good for very tight work due to blade wobble. Cabinet guys run 8.5" or smaller for a reason plus they are lighter.

You're not touching a 12" compound that I'm aware of for that budget.
 

nightpoison

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As for portable table saws you will never go wrong with a Mikita. I've had one for over 20 years. They are basically a Makita skill saw inverted with a table. I worked for a guy who ran his over with his truck, put pine sides on it and we used it for years after with no issues.
I was actually thinking of the non portable Rigid table saw
http://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-1..._8903vry57826_pcrid_74285762149094_pkw__pmt__

I don't see the need for it to be portable.

You're not touching a 12" compound that I'm aware of for that budget.
both the dewalt and rigid are 399 for the 12" compound slider, but I do keep hearing about blade wobble, and I do need to work with some smaller cuts at times. I think I'll worry about larger cuts when I need it, probably won't happen much. so i'm leaning towards the 10" now
 

PistolShooter

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I was actually thinking of the non portable Rigid table saw
http://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-1..._8903vry57826_pcrid_74285762149094_pkw__pmt__

I don't see the need for it to be portable.



both the dewalt and rigid are 399 for the 12" compound slider, but I do keep hearing about blade wobble, and I do need to work with some smaller cuts at times. I think I'll worry about larger cuts when I need it, probably won't happen much. so i'm leaning towards the 10" now
I have been thinking of buying that same table saw, curious if anyone has any experience.

I don't notice blade wobble with my rigid 12" compound slider. I've done a lot of molding and even cut down 10.5" stair treads with no issues. A good blade makes a big difference.
 

john m

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For a miter saw buy a Hitachi. They are all in the same price bracket so buy a popular brand. Make sure you get a compound miter. I use one for construction. mine is a dual rail slide I use it all the time, it's 20 years old and still like new.

As for portable table saws you will never go wrong with a Mikita. I've had one for over 20 years. They are basically a Makita skill saw inverted with a table. I worked for a guy who ran his over with his truck, put pine sides on it and we used it for years after with no issues.
+1 for the Hitachi. I have a 12" slide compound miter.
15 year and counting. I use it once a week
 

Woodstock

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Miter saws are for making long stuff shorter, and table saws are for making wide stuff narrower. I looked at them all, used a few, and wound up buying the Ridgid 10" non-slider for about $200. It's very accurate, and powerful enough so it doesn't bog down. I have one blade for framing cuts on 2x lumber, and another for finer cuts on trim. It's plenty portable, and I built my own table that sits on two sawhorses.
I also have had a Makita 8 1/2" table saw for about 30 years, and it rips 2" oak and anything else I throw at it without a problem.
I don't think any 10" or 12" miter saw will go through a 4x4 in one pass. I've had to cut 6x6's and railroad ties, and used an 8 1/2" skilsaw held against a Swanson Speed Square, turned the piece 3 times, and finished the cuts with a sawzall.
 

PistolShooter

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Miter saws are for making long stuff shorter, and table saws are for making wide stuff narrower. I looked at them all, used a few, and wound up buying the Ridgid 10" non-slider for about $200. It's very accurate, and powerful enough so it doesn't bog down. I have one blade for framing cuts on 2x lumber, and another for finer cuts on trim. It's plenty portable, and I built my own table that sits on two sawhorses.
I also have had a Makita 8 1/2" table saw for about 30 years, and it rips 2" oak and anything else I throw at it without a problem.
I don't think any 10" or 12" miter saw will go through a 4x4 in one pass. I've had to cut 6x6's and railroad ties, and used an 8 1/2" skilsaw held against a Swanson Speed Square, turned the piece 3 times, and finished the cuts with a sawzall.
The Rigid 12" compound sliding cuts 4x6" all day. I was just cutting some over the weekend.
 

Big_Red

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I was actually thinking of the non portable Rigid table saw
http://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-1..._8903vry57826_pcrid_74285762149094_pkw__pmt__

I don't see the need for it to be portable.
I have been thinking of buying that same table saw, curious if anyone has any experience.
I've owned the Rigid R4512 for less than a year so I don't have a lot of experience with it but so far so good. I've done a lot of research and sifted through dozens of reviews (good and bad), forum discussions, videos, etc, before I bought it. Good outweighed the bad and since I have the newest generation saw all the issues nagging the previous generations have been corrected. With some tweaking this saw can be very accurate. It is by no means a $3000 Grizzly but comes as close to a cabinet saw as possible without breaking the bank. The saw is quite heavy (260 pounds I think ??) but that makes it very sturdy. It comes with a set of casters and a lift mechanism that allows for it to be somewhat movable. The saw used to come with 4 independent casters so it could be moved easily in every direction but the newer gen models come with a 3-caster set where two castes are stationary. Makes moving it around in tight spaces somewhat of a pain in the ass.

If you want a good table saw and don't have the $$$ or the space for a cabinet saw, this might fit your bill. There is also a comparable Delta saw but I do not have any experience with that one.
 
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Ridgid is way too heavy... I have owned both Dewalt and Makita and both have been great. If I was going to buy another in that price range I would probably buy Makita in a 10" or Dewalt in a 12" depending on what size I was looking for. As others have said a lot of the saw is in the blade.
 
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For a miter saw buy a Hitachi. They are all in the same price bracket so buy a popular brand. Make sure you get a compound miter. I use one for construction. mine is a dual rail slide I use it all the time, it's 20 years old and still like new.

As for portable table saws you will never go wrong with a Mikita. I've had one for over 20 years. They are basically a Makita skill saw inverted with a table. I worked for a guy who ran his over with his truck, put pine sides on it and we used it for years after with no issues.

We just picked up a Hitachi compound, slide in one of the shops I work at. Terrific saw.

I own a Millwaukee compound miter. (No slide) It is dead- on, balls accurate and a beast, but can't recommend it unless you can track one down of it's vintage.
 
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grey

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Hitachi c10fsh or modern equivalent. ive had it for 12 years and use it daily. Its accurate and does not quit. Blade - Tenryu silencer, teflon coated if you want the premium version. The company I work for generally uses Kapex saws, and while nice, the C10FSH performs equally in my opinion if kept in tune
 

daveyburt

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Didn't read everyone's responses but, I'll offer this.

If bevel cuts are in your future, I'd go with a 10. As long as you got a 10 slider, all your buying in a 12 is the ability to cut an inch deeper.
The 12's deflect noticeably on bevel cuts. Making getting those cuts perfect is more difficult.

I have a 12" Bosch slider. I read about, and noticed deflection on bevels using it.
Bosch stuff seems nice, though it's been a few years since I've purchased anything new.

When you get it, make some cool stuff!
:)

ETA: If you have the space, buy a stand for it.
 
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NHCraigT

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Have run many different brands of miter saws over 30 +years.

Currently running 2 Dewalt sliders and 8 Dewalt regular compound saws.

The overall unanimous feedback consensus from the workers is = Dewalt
 

Maddawg1952

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I normally would not recommend a Craftsman power tool, but my company has had them all, from Dewalt to Bosch to Makita to Hitachi and by far my favorite is the Craftsman 12" double bevel sliding compound mitre saw. I have had it since 2004 and it has never failed me. I recommend you get a stand too unless you are going to attached it to a permanent bench. I have an adjustable portable stand where you can extend the arms and alter the elevation of each arm as well. It is a heavy combination though and is best moved with two people, though a strong person can handle it awkwardly himself.
Now don't get me wrong, because I have numerous Craftsman cordless and corded professional series tools. I have a sliding compound saw that I bought new and from the day I bought it I can't get it to cut a 90 degree cut that is true and straight, I'm a very competent craftsman and have adjusted and adjusted it with no better results. I've actually tried to sell this but I can't demonstrate the ability to cut a true 45. I use my Makita 1980's model 14" chop saw constantly the "BEAST" has never failed to make tight, square joinery.
 
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snax

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Big as you can go. Compound. With a laser. Check the fence with a straight edge. Ive had both a porter cable and a dewalt ive had to return because the fence was not true, so your mitre cuts would be off a degree or two and your 45s and 90s would never match up
 

MarkT

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I have a 10" dewalt that serves my needs for now. If I upgrade, I would get a 12" compound, but I haven't done any research on brand.

Since I purchased an Incra miter 10000HD for my table saw, I find myself using that much more than the miter saw. Just depends on what you are doing. http://incra.com/miter_gauges-miter1000hd.html
 
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