MBA Folks: Was it easy for you?

Was your MBA program really easy?


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CoastieRon

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I don't know how to explain it. I feared going for my MBA, and am finding it extremely easy so far. Was it easy for you too?

I'm at Rivier College in Nashua....
 
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Got mine at Boston College. Generally not difficult, per se, as long as you pay attention and actually do the work, although some classes were tough. Most profs assigned quite a bit of work, which was only a problem because I was in the part-time evening program and we all had day jobs, so it was a time suck. Def learned quite a bit though.
 
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Difficult? To pass? No.


You get out what you put into it: Like undergrad, you can skate by and get all B's or you can apply yourself and learn something.

Also, 50% of the value of an MBA is the networking & alumni contacts: Success is all about who you know. This is why getting an MBA from a tiny community college has a fraction the value of a big school even though the classes may be comparable.
 

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I did mine at Suffolk University, started it 6 yrs after getting my BSEE (NU) and it was the primary reason for relocating back to MA from CT.

I really enjoyed the program and learned a lot of useful info about business that you don't get in an engineering degree.

SU put together an MBA resume book which is how I landed my job at DEC! After graduation and before DEC hired me, I went back and taught one class at SU's BSBA program and enjoyed that as well . . . it probably set the bug to teach in me that manifested itself ultimately in 2A Training after retiring from the business world!
 

CoastieRon

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Don't get me wrong, I've been getting some real quality education out of it, I just thought it would be more than challenging.

However, that might change next semester with Accounting and Global finance.....
 

Rob Boudrie

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There were only three classes in the MBA program that were at all "intense" - Accounting, Statistics and a quantative finance course. (the first two were at the univ of Rochester; the last at Northeastern). There was a course taught by Johnathan Pond that was a wealth of information but not exactly difficult (I forgot the exact course title).

I think a CFA (Chartered Financial Analyst) is more intensive and impressive that a non-premium MBA.
 

slap shot

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Like others said, after an engineering degree not difficult. Realized that a lot of other degreed students struggled not having any math skills when it came to statistics. Other than the tons of papers I had to write for my sometimes illiterate teammates.
 
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There were only three classes in the MBA program that were at all "intense" - Accounting, Statistics and a quantative finance course. (the first two were at the univ of Rochester; the last at Northeastern). There was a course taught by Johnathan Pond that was a wealth of information but not exactly difficult (I forgot the exact course title).

I think a CFA (Chartered Financial Analyst) is more intensive and impressive that a non-premium MBA.

The CFA & MBA have completely different uses and reflect disparate skillsets.
 

CrackPot

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Business school is about learning how BS people think. There is certainly material to learn, but you can readily learn it yourself as needed. The key is learning the language and process by which BS people talk and think about problems. You are then in the club.

As said earlier in the thread, for non-engineers, the finance, accounting pieces are the most challenging. For those that think linearly the marketing type classes will be the most foreign.

If you can read a P&L and balance sheet, write a business plan, and read a case study you can pass BS easily.
 

frenchman

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I got mine just because I could, and it was free. Never actually worked in the field. At the time (10 or so years ago) we used mathematical models and Excel solver to get to shadow prices etc, so that was some of a PITA. Statistics use ridiculously long formulas, and I sucked. I remember one practice problem where you had to statistically determinate people getting in and off a bus. Somehow, I had -12 people in the bus at terminus. Oh well. Accounting (at least the euro double accounting) is just logic, and a breeze, really.
 

M1911

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When I was getting Masters in Geotechnical Engineering, I needed a gut minor that would be give me some easy courses that wouldn't take much time. I minored in Business, taking graduate business classes with the MBA's at Cornell's Business School.

Yeah, they were easy. I remember the Corporate Finance class, where all the MBA's would be in the first two rows of the lecture hall, sucking up to the professor. I was with the pack of engineering students sitting in the back of the lecture hall, eating our bagels, drinking coffee, sort of paying attention, and destroying the curve for the MBA students.
 
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Went to NYU at night and on weekends for three years. The work wasn't all that difficult, but there sure was a lot of it. Went to class two nights a week, and did homework usually two nights a week, and one weekend day. As others said, you really get a lot back depending on what you put into it. What's nice about that is you can really hunker down on the stuff that interests you and learn a ton.

After engineering school, the quantitative stuff is an absolute joke. There would be hedge fund managers in class absolutely struggling to get through topics, or trying to find the slope of a line. Wasn't exactly advanced calculus. That being said, not all MBA programs are equal either. Some get a heck of a lot more respect than others, and some are just plain laughed at. Don't even bother with an program not accredited. I know some people that went to a community college and corporate finance classes were optional. Interesting...
 

CoastieRon

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I got mine just because I could, and it was free. Never actually worked in the field. \
I'm doing it for pretty much the same reasons:

1. It's free. I'm actually running a surplus right now from my 90% post 9/11 funding, between the book stipend, 90% tuition coverage and 90% BAH for E5 with dependent, I can cover the 10% missing, the misc fees and still run a surplus.

2. I'm not sure I'll ever actually use it. I may be able to leverage a new compensation package out of it, but I'm definitely not an "MBA" type (read: not a fan of ties, button down shirts, etc).

I've been lucky/blessed that my plan when I was 18 actually worked, that in the end service would provide for me later in life, and it is. All things considered, for as young/old as I am (mid 40's), I'm pretty entrenched in my niche field (DoD Industrial security compliance) to be able to move to something else. Then again, who knows.

As for networking, 75% of my classmates thus far have been Indian, who are going back to India when they graduate. So I'm pretty sure that networking aspect goes right out the window (not to mention my foreign contact list which is growing every day.......)
 
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As for networking, 75% of my classmates thus far have been Indian, who are going back to India when they graduate. So I'm pretty sure that networking aspect goes right out the window (not to mention my foreign contact list which is growing every day.......)

and that is the difference between a top 20 school and a "River College". Go to a top 10 school and the networking is elite: The MBA is about more than the classroom.

Honestly, this is where I laugh at the engineers who disparage "MBA Types sucking up to professors": Ever consider that perhaps those relationships would be useful after you graduate? You know, using people skills to build a network of people who may be useful in your career?

"It's not what you know, it is who you know." Personally I think it is a little of both (thus my 50% comment earlier).
 

M1911

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I have had to dabble in Engineering Economics- is this a subject covered in most of the programs attended by NES's?
Sophomore year engineering economics was far more rigorous than the graduate level corporate finance class that I took.
 

CoastieRon

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and that is the difference between a top 20 school and a "River College". Go to a top 10 school and the networking is elite: The MBA is about more than the classroom.
Oh I understand this completely. It was a conscience decision for me to go to Riv again. Most of the profs are big in the local industry that I work in (DoD contract space/BAE/Raytheon/Kolsman etc), and my goal is to network with them more than anything else.
 
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Oh I understand this completely. It was a conscience decision for me to go to Riv again. Most of the profs are big in the local industry that I work in (DoD contract space/BAE/Raytheon/Kolsman etc), and my goal is to network with them more than anything else.

It just goes to my earlier point that the classroom learning is only half the value of an MBA. What separates a top ten program from a BC or BU isn't the material because we all read the same cases from Harvard Publishing. The difference is the other students, the alumni, and the network. Hell, the business leaders in most of the cases we study are alumni of Harvard. Having a discussion about a case study with the guy who wrote it is invaluable and that's on top of the connections you make.

You just don't get that kind of networking when 75% of your classmates barely speak engrish and are "going home" in two years.
 
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and that is the difference between a top 20 school and a "River College". Go to a top 10 school and the networking is elite: The MBA is about more than the classroom.

Honestly, this is where I laugh at the engineers who disparage "MBA Types sucking up to professors": Ever consider that perhaps those relationships would be useful after you graduate? You know, using people skills to build a network of people who may be useful in your career?

"It's not what you know, it is who you know." Personally I think it is a little of both (thus my 50% comment earlier).
Most of my profs came from industry, not academia, and had a lot of connections still.
 

Rob Boudrie

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When I lived in Rochester, NY in the mid 80's Kodak was still flying high.

There was an interesting case where Kodak arranged for the University of Rochester MBA program to rescind an acceptance offer to a student from Fuji Photo, telling Kodak it would "rethink" keeping Kodak on the tuition reimbursement program if that student was allowed to attend and mingle with Kodak employees.

The powerbrokers at the UofR called in a favor from the academic community, and arranged for the Fuji student to get a late acceptance to the Wharton school so he would be willing not to make an issue of it.
 

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and that is the difference between a top 20 school and a "River College". Go to a top 10 school and the networking is elite: The MBA is about more than the classroom.

Honestly, this is where I laugh at the engineers who disparage "MBA Types sucking up to professors": Ever consider that perhaps those relationships would be useful after you graduate? You know, using people skills to build a network of people who may be useful in your career?

"It's not what you know, it is who you know." Personally I think it is a little of both (thus my 50% comment earlier).
Very true. I used to run into the Dean of the Business School (SU) at upscale restaurants in Boston, one professor (department chair) that I had for 3 courses also worked for a think tank in Boston, he was responsible for recommending me as an adjunct instructor at SU and even today we are still connected via LinkedIn (he moved on to run a program in another state).

SU isn't really strong on those relationship interconnections as it was a commuter school where we had little contact outside of the classroom.
 

mibro

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Poll is missing a category - MBA program was hard and I worked my ass off.

I'm sure I'll come off as a d!ck here, so sorry about that, but American education has been dumbed down to the point that every degree is easy everywhere with the exception of a handful of top schools and a few engineering and hard science majors.

I got mine at Harvard almost 30 years ago and the first year was very challenging, not quite as hard as my engineering undergrad, but a grueling boot camp with a very high workload nevertheless.
 
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Best of luck CoastieRon, I hope it helps you in advancing your career (or at least earning more money).

I selected:
LOL who needs it? Not because I think it's useless, but for me at my age, the cost/benefit ratio would not add up to any substantial net gain and only serve to bury me in debt, FWIIW.



Luckily, you are "awake" and could probably speak to how things really are in the "Global finance" department --I'd love to see the syllabus for that class.

Best wishes !
 

M1911

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Honestly, this is where I laugh at the engineers who disparage "MBA Types sucking up to professors": Ever consider that perhaps those relationships would be useful after you graduate? You know, using people skills to build a network of people who may be useful in your career?

"It's not what you know, it is who you know." Personally I think it is a little of both (thus my 50% comment earlier).
Sorry, but we were way too tired from studying to play nice with the MBA students who were having trouble computing the slope of a line.
 
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If you work in Business, it is easy. In any event, it can be time consuming depending on the prof and course. Just remember, ignore most of the nonsense taught in the soft classes. Much of the program is designed more to survive in the Corporate world. I would suggest going heavy in Finance. THat is where the money is and nothing has been more worth while for me than concentrating in Finance. Yest, it is boring and more tedious than marketing, but you will not regret focusing on capital markets, debt, equity, value models, financial analysis and keeping a business afloat financially.
 

goodzilla

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Got mine at Boston College. Generally not difficult, per se, as long as you pay attention and actually do the work, although some classes were tough. Most profs assigned quite a bit of work, which was only a problem because I was in the part-time evening program and we all had day jobs, so it was a time suck. Def learned quite a bit though.
BC, part timer here as well (2006/7). Pales in comparison to engineering work but I agree with kalesh's assessment.
 

mibro

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Honestly, this is where I laugh at the engineers who disparage "MBA Types sucking up to professors": Ever consider that perhaps those relationships would be useful after you graduate? You know, using people skills to build a network of people who may be useful in your career?
That's important but the primary reason to get an MBA at a top school is for the opportunity to interview with the companies that recruit there. The lifetime monetary value of an MBA from one of these schools is very high whereas an MBA from a lower tier school should be viewed more as a way to increase your knowledge for your own personal satisfaction and effectiveness.

The potential for upward mobility is huge. My compensation tripled my first year out of business school. I eventually fell off the upward mobility train because I am an immigrant, am too iconoclastic and value my time more than money, but some people get an unbelievable boost.

The downside of this is the so-called Crimson Curse, as you will get to know people who will make you feel like a total failure. One of my classmates, an engineer, was COO of Continental Airlines within about five years of graduation. I know many other people who are very solidly in the 1%.
 

usp45ct

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Pretty simple. I have a degree laser physics and one in engineering.

the MBA struck me as easy coursework and subjects, just a ton of busy work. Things like read a few hundred pages in the next four days on dry subjects. Almost like they want you to jump through the hoops in order to get your paper.
 
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