Massachusetts Permit to Store More Than 10,000 Rounds

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Per current MA law, a single family home can not have more than 10,000 rounds of center fire, 10,000 rounds of rim fire, 5,000 rounds of shotgun ammo, etc. I am citing information from here: Massachusetts Ammo and Component Storage Regulations - MassReloading and have confirmed the information with a few other online resources.

HOWEVER, with a permit issued by the local fire marshal, you can store in excess of these quantities, up to a certain limit (not exceeding 100,000 rounds total). The law also mentions black powder (max 2lbs without permit; 5lbs with permit), which I also have a small amount of in addition to about 2-3,000 rounds collectively of center fire, rim fire, and shotgun ammo.

My question: has anyone applied for this type of permit with their fire marshal? Is it one permit that covers all types of ammunition and ammunition components, or do I have to apply for a permit for each type, i.e. one permit for black powder, one for rim fire, one for center fire, etc?

I obviously want to stay within the letter of the law, but I’m curious if I go inquire about a permit if it may raise more questions and be more of a headache than it’s worth in the event I ever exceed any one of those quantities. FWIW, I’m in a small metro west town with a high(er) percentage of gun ownership, relative to surrounding towns.
 

LittleCalm

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Mine was easy enough to get from the town Marshall. Don’t care about the town as much as I care about my insurance company not having a reason to deny coverage for failing to comply with laws, regardless of how dumb they might be.
 

76Too

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I skirted the rule by keeping my other 10,000 rounds and 16lbs of smokeless powder in my detached garage.

Seriously though (even though i DID do that), no one is EVER going to know unless your house gets searched. I realized that I was approaching the 10,000 mark after I had already passed it :D

Just moved to Indiana a few weeks ago though...and now i'm wondering how much ammo I can fit in the third bedroom we're not using (and if the floor joists will support that amount)?
 

headednorth

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I skirted the rule by keeping my other 10,000 rounds and 16lbs of smokeless powder in my detached garage.

Seriously though (even though i DID do that), no one is EVER going to know unless your house gets searched. I realized that I was approaching the 10,000 mark after I had already passed it :D

Just moved to Indiana a few weeks ago though...and now i'm wondering how much ammo I can fit in the third bedroom we're not using (and if the floor joists will support that amount)?
You never have enough, but you know youre close when you start thinking about if your home can structurally support what you have. Not "do I have enough room" or "my wife is pissed" or "should I be spending money on something else", but "Is this going to cause my second floor to become the new first floor?"
 
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voidoid

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Per current MA law, a single family home can not have more than 10,000 rounds of center fire, 10,000 rounds of rim fire, 5,000 rounds of shotgun ammo, etc. I am citing information from here: Massachusetts Ammo and Component Storage Regulations - MassReloading and have confirmed the information with a few other online resources.
Instead of looking at these "online resources," why don't you take a look at the actual CMR so you can be fully aware what the terrible, awful, scary penalties are for not having the permit?
 

Rob Boudrie

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Mine was easy enough to get from the town Marshall. Don’t care about the town as much as I care about my insurance company not having a reason to deny coverage for failing to comply with laws, regardless of how dumb they might be.
Not this crap again.

If I ask for a law or judicial site, the response will probably be a content-free reply like "I just know", "OK you be the test case", "Its common sense", etc. But, I will not get a law, court decision, or even a copy of a policy with such a clause. No, that does not void your insurance coverage, just like an OUI does not void your car insurance,
 

Uzi2

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If you haven't cracked the slab yet, keep stacking it.

I used to routinely bring almost 10k rds to the range with me and usually bring home less than half and a couple of buckets of empty brass.

Any limit on ammo is bullshit. Ammo is far less of a hazard than the gallon of olive oil in one's kitchen, the foam in one's couch or the fabric in one's carpets and clothing. Oh, how about that car thats parked under the house with 25 gallons of gasoline in it, Or the lawn mower, snowblower, chainsaw, weed whacker, leaf blower, et al with their gasoline tanks?
 
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Just wait and see what happens when we hear that a DemocRAT might get elected again. The fire marshall will be overrun with applications to exceed and the system will crash![rofl]
 
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Whoa, thanks for all the replies and input (except for you, Asaltweapon). I figured the general consensus would be to keep stacking and packing until someone asks about the pallets of surplus 7.62 in the front yard! Luckily the slab in my basement can take some weight so I’ll carry on. I just signed up for Target Sports Prime so I’m taking advantage of the discounts and free shipping.
 

Buck F

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Mine was easy enough to get from the town Marshall. Don’t care about the town as much as I care about my insurance company not having a reason to deny coverage for failing to comply with laws, regardless of how dumb they might be.

Not this crap again.

If I ask for a law or judicial site, the response will probably be a content-free reply like "I just know", "OK you be the test case", "Its common sense", etc. But, I will not get a law, court decision, or even a copy of a policy with such a clause. No, that does not void your insurance coverage, just like an OUI does not void your car insurance,
Thanks Rob, you beat me to it
 
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First rule of fight club is dont approach the authorities unsolicited and divulge that youre participating in fight club to such a degree that you feel you may need a permit to store all your fight club.
My initials thoughts exactly, very well put!

Instead of looking at these "online resources," why don't you take a look at the actual CMR so you can be fully aware what the terrible, awful, scary penalties are for not having the permit?
Thanks bud. I’d be getting a permit from the fire marshal. Last I checked, he doesn’t carry handcuffs and isn’t buddy-buddy with the C.O.P.
Do YOU know if you’d go to federal pound-me-in-the-a** prison if YOU didn’t have a permit?
 

LittleCalm

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I got plenty of other stuff to worry about. This is a silly but easy enough permit to get. Also required for certain quantities of powder and primers. My fire chief is cool and was like sure no problem and also appreciated knowing that we store the quantities that require the permit.
 

voidoid

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Thanks bud. I’d be getting a permit from the fire marshal. Last I checked, he doesn’t carry handcuffs and isn’t buddy-buddy with the C.O.P.
Do YOU know if you’d go to federal pound-me-in-the-a** prison if YOU didn’t have a permit?
Yes - I checked and the penalty for violating 527 CMR 13.00 is that the fire marshall locks you in a room with a television playing Maura Healey's "personal video collection" on repeat.
 

Tackdriver

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I've had the explosives permit for about 15 years now. Not because its required, but because if there is a fire at my house the fire department is aware of any potential danger. (As an aside, the police have never come to oppress me or my rights over my explosives.)

Dave
 
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