MA North Shore new hunter looking for experienced hunter guidance

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I am 38M living in Reading MA, looking to get into hunting, does not matter what it is. I have an older style compound bow, and a Remington 870 Express. What I lack is experience. Last time I went bird and rabbit hunting was with my uncle when I was 12, and could barely hold a shotgun. Never hunted as an adult.

I am looking for a seasoned hunter or group to take me under their wings. What I need, where to go, what to hunt and how to field dress. I have not found a program for this, and without a seasoned hunter I am afraid of major screwup.

Please help!
 
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I picked it up on my own. Have been successful but it's (enjoyable) work. Lots of knowledge in books. Peter Fiduccia and Hal Blood are two authors to check out (assuming White Tail). Field dressing guides can be found on you tube. So can a lot of informational videos. Check out DIY sportsman. Also listen to the Wired to Hunt podcasts.

Sadly you'll have a hard time recruiting someone to take you. Most (again assuming White Tail) hunters put in a lot of work on discovering and developing their spots/areas. Last thing they want to do is bring someone - hell anyone - to them. But if someone does take you under their wing - I have one bit of advice. If they bring you to a spot - that doesn't mean it's cool for you to begin hunting there. At least not without the other guy's sign off. Anywhere they take you - consider it their spot unless they tell you otherwise. They're showing you what to look for when you go out on your own. They're not showing you specifically to go.
 
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I picked it up on my own. Have been successful but it's (enjoyable) work. Lots of knowledge in books. Peter Fiduccia and Hal Blood are two authors to check out (assuming White Tail). Field dressing guides can be found on you tube. So can a lot of informational videos. Check out DIY sportsman. Also listen to the Wired to Hunt podcasts.

Sadly you'll have a hard time recruiting someone to take you. Most (again assuming White Tail) hunters put in a lot of work on discovering and developing their spots/areas. Last thing they want to do is bring someone - hell anyone - to them. But if someone does take you under their wing - I have one bit of advice. If they bring you to a spot - that doesn't mean it's cool for you to begin hunting there. At least not without the other guy's sign off. Anywhere they take you - consider it their spot unless they tell you otherwise. They're showing you what to look for when you go out on your own. They're not showing you specifically to go.
Good to hear you picked it up on your own. I feel that for my case I need that initial guidance. My assessment would be that I would not go if no one will guide me thru the actual safety process, I lack self initiative or feel enough intimidated by the process. Its different in class than in real life. I am not looking at going for a deer right away, maybe start small, like turkey, geese or rabbit, then move up. I am hoping someone generously volunteers to help me.

The Mass WildLife class I took covered the ethical portion of the hunt, and I totally agree with your tip, if someone did indeed help me I would be eternally grateful and would respect their spots, never go by myself or others. Once I build up my confidence and feel comfortable, then I would look for my own spots.

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I taught myself as well. Only have about 4 seasons under my belt. Essentially you learn by making a lot of mistakes. My first time I went dear hunting was opening day of pheasant season on a stocked WMA... Thats really the best way to learn, you screw up then try something different. If you dont have the initiative to learn by screwing up and just want someone to tell you everything there is to know then its just not going to happen. As for safety, it pretty much comes down to assuming every weapon is loaded all the time and always being sure of your backdrop.
 

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First thing you should do is take the MA hunter safety course. Notwithstanding it's a government mandated license requirement, the people who run it are passionate volunteers who know A LOT about hunting, and are very happy to share their knowledge.

Then, join a club. You'll meet people willing to socialize and help you out getting started.
 
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First thing you should do is take the MA hunter safety course. Notwithstanding it's a government mandated license requirement, the people who run it are passionate volunteers who know A LOT about hunting, and are very happy to share their knowledge.

Then, join a club. You'll meet people willing to socialize and help you out getting started.
I have been an member of MRA for years, and completed the Hunters Safety class last year.
 
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I taught myself as well. Only have about 4 seasons under my belt. Essentially you learn by making a lot of mistakes. My first time I went dear hunting was opening day of pheasant season on a stocked WMA... Thats really the best way to learn, you screw up then try something different. If you dont have the initiative to learn by screwing up and just want someone to tell you everything there is to know then its just not going to happen. As for safety, it pretty much comes down to assuming every weapon is loaded all the time and always being sure of your backdrop.
Thanks, I don't mind making mistakes, but not the ones that cost my life. Even something small, like wearing wool socks vs cotton (as an example) are unknown to someone like me, while a seasoned hunter may not think twice about it. I guess having a checklist would be helpful. Broken into before, during, and after sections.... Better than nothing I guess.

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I assume you have all the state mandated training already. So here it goes.
First figure out what you want to hunt. With a bow and 870 you are probably most likely to enjoy deer, duck, goose, & turkey hunting. Typically the duck & goose will require a boat of some sort and maybe dog as well.
That said, you need to find out where to hunt. Look up the WMA's in the area and do some scouting. You tube the shit out of hunting videos. There is alot of info out there. It takes years of patience and resilience to see real results, so you should enjoy waking well before dawn, hiking and being alone; if not, hunting may not be for you.

Unfortunately, I agree with the poster above who said
"Sadly you'll have a hard time recruiting someone to take you. Most (again assuming White Tail) hunters put in a lot of work on discovering and developing their spots/areas. Last thing they want to do is bring someone - hell anyone - to them. But if someone does take you under their wing - I have one bit of advice. If they bring you to a spot - that doesn't mean it's cool for you to begin hunting there. At least not without the other guy's sign off. Anywhere they take you - consider it their spot unless they tell you otherwise. They're showing you what to look for when you go out on your own. They're not showing you specifically to go."

Its strange but true. I was lucky enough to have a neighbor help me out when I started. Hell I'm always learning. But I always set out on my own after alot of reasearch and that is when I was successful. Good luck it ain't easy.
 

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Thanks, I don't mind making mistakes, but not the ones that cost my life. Even something small, like wearing wool socks vs cotton (as an example) are unknown to someone like me, while a seasoned hunter may not think twice about it. I guess having a checklist would be helpful. Broken into before, during, and after sections.... Better than nothing I guess.

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http://www.in.gov/dnr/fishwild/files/fw-deer_hunting_checklist.pdf

Take this with a grain of salt. It was produced by Hoosiers. Which reminds me of a joke.

An Indiana mother asked her son to go to the store for some potatoes and tomatoes for dinner, and to go to Kentucky, because the crops there were better in that blessed land.

"Be sure to ask for them the way they speak: Sir, may I have some 'maters and 'taters please?"

Son: "Maters and Taters. Got it".

So he went to Kentucky and walked into a store and asked the clerk, politely, "Sir, may I have some 'maters and 'taters please?"?

Clerk: "Sonny, ya'll from Indiana, ain'tcha?"
Son: "Why yes, how did you know?"
Clerk: "Cuz this here'sa hardware store".
 
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You're gonna have to do like most of us have. Find huntable woods, lace up your boots and get to walking. Look for typical sign like scat, trails, and old rubs on trees. Cameras will help but sometimes they grow leg, especially on public land.

My advice is go deep and find swamp. Every deer has wet feet...
 

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Good to hear you picked it up on your own. I feel that for my case I need that initial guidance. My assessment would be that I would not go if no one will guide me thru the actual safety process, I lack self initiative or feel enough intimidated by the process. Its different in class than in real life. I am not looking at going for a deer right away, maybe start small, like turkey, geese or rabbit, then move up. I am hoping someone generously volunteers to help me.

The Mass WildLife class I took covered the ethical portion of the hunt, and I totally agree with your tip, if someone did indeed help me I would be eternally grateful and would respect their spots, never go by myself or others. Once I build up my confidence and feel comfortable, then I would look for my own spots.

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start simple. Squirrel opens in zones 1-9 on the 14th of september. Read some articles on squirrel hunting. Pick out a recipe ahead of time. Youll learn how to move in the woods and navigate. All you need is a 20 or 12 gauge shotgun with some high brass 4-6 shot through a full or mod imp choke. Close up hit em with the fringe or distance the full or mi choke will hit any squirrel at a tree top. Field dreassimg em is easy just utube it. Have fun. As far as safety goes squirrel with a scattergun is about as safe as it gets. You are not snap shooting like shooting pheasant or rabbit so you can take yout time and check the backdrop amd aim before you shoot and that shot is not going too far. Ive hunted squirrel for awhile now and it is very rewarding and it gets us out there early!
 
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start simple. Squirrel opens in zones 1-9 on the 14th of september. Read some articles on squirrel hunting. Pick out a recipe ahead of time. Youll learn how to move in the woods and navigate. All you need is a 20 or 12 gauge shotgun with some high brass 4-6 shot through a full or mod imp choke. Close up hit em with the fringe or distance the full or mi choke will hit any squirrel at a tree top. Field dreassimg em is easy just utube it. Have fun. As far as safety goes squirrel with a scattergun is about as safe as it gets. You are not snap shooting like shooting pheasant or rabbit so you can take yout time and check the backdrop amd aim before you shoot and that shot is not going too far. Ive hunted squirrel for awhile now and it is very rewarding and it gets us out there early!
This sounds reasonable to start for a noob like me.

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I taught myself as well. Only have about 4 seasons under my belt. Essentially you learn by making a lot of mistakes. My first time I went dear hunting was opening day of pheasant season on a stocked WMA... Thats really the best way to learn, you screw up then try something different. If you dont have the initiative to learn by screwing up and just want someone to tell you everything there is to know then its just not going to happen. As for safety, it pretty much comes down to assuming every weapon is loaded all the time and always being sure of your backdrop.

LOL... Dude I made the same mistake... Freetown State Forest... I had several spots scouted out and they all got blown out by bird hunters on day 1. I had to find new woods, learn them and figure out where the deer were - all during season. Managed to bag a 6 pointer in Dec during shotgun. I actually bagged 2 that rookie year...
 
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LOL... Dude I made the same mistake... Freetown State Forest... I had several spots scouted out and they all got blown out by bird hunters on day 1. I had to find new woods, learn them and figure out where the deer were - all during season. Managed to bag a 6 pointer in Dec during shotgun. I actually bagged 2 that rookie year...
Somewhere in this hunting forum there is a post from a bow hunter that set up his tree stand 20 feet high on the edge of a stocked pheasant field.....and then came to NES to bitch about the ******* pheasant humters that took over his "spot". Bwahahahah

- - - Updated - - -

LOL... Dude I made the same mistake... Freetown State Forest... I had several spots scouted out and they all got blown out by bird hunters on day 1. I had to find new woods, learn them and figure out where the deer were - all during season. Managed to bag a 6 pointer in Dec during shotgun. I actually bagged 2 that rookie year...
Somewhere in this hunting forum there is a post from a bow hunter that set up his tree stand 20 feet high on the edge of a stocked pheasant field.....and then came to NES to bitch about the ******* pheasant humters that took over his "spot". Bwahahahah
 
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I wasn't pissed when it happened to me... my mistake, that was literally my first time hunting ever. But because of that mistake I learned that pheasant were stocked places in the state and the next week I went back to the same place with a shotgun and shot my first pheasant.
 

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I wasn't pissed when it happened to me... my mistake, that was literally my first time hunting ever. But because of that mistake I learned that pheasant were stocked places in the state and the next week I went back to the same place with a shotgun and shot my first pheasant.
That's turning lemons into lemonade. Well done!
 

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I wasn't pissed when it happened to me... my mistake, that was literally my first time hunting ever. But because of that mistake I learned that pheasant were stocked places in the state and the next week I went back to the same place with a shotgun and shot my first pheasant.
Was not saying it was you. The guy that posted it last year was not new to hunting from what could tell. I just found it very funny that the dude thought the pheasant hunters were *******s for burning his spot when pheasant hunters were hunting stocked wma! Also in that hilarious post the guy complained that he surprised a couple of pheasant hunters because they should have been paying more attention. Mind you he was 20 feet up in a tree in full camo with no orange on.....at the edge of a field....stocked with pheasant
 
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Was not saying it was you. The guy that posted it last year was not new to hunting from what could tell. I just found it very funny that the dude thought the pheasant hunters were *******s for burning his spot when pheasant hunters were hunting stocked wma! Also in that hilarious post the guy complained that he surprised a couple of pheasant hunters because they should have been paying more attention. Mind you he was 20 feet up in a tree in full camo with no orange on.....at the edge of a field....stocked with pheasant
I didnt take your comment as being directed at me I was just telling my own personal experience. Might have looked like I was taking offense but hey thats the message boards for ya.
 
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Come to think of it...I'm pretty sure I hunted a stocked WMA last year (rookie season). I wasn't lucky enough to bag anything last year, but to be honest...I started late, didn't scout, and went at it alone as far as learning/scouting/etc.

Much like the OP, I was looking (and still am) for pointers on finding my own spots rather than expecting a seasoned hunter to just hand over a honey hole. Actually, I'd be more interested in someone telling me basically where NOT to bother trying. I feel like I'd be a little more comfortable tagging along with an experienced hunter, maybe not in a particularly super-secret spot, but to lead me in the right direction, locate some sign, break off and each try a spot semi-near each other. This way if/when one of us takes a shot, sees an animal, etc. I can learn "on the spot". If that makes any sense...
 
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Come to think of it...I'm pretty sure I hunted a stocked WMA last year (rookie season). I wasn't lucky enough to bag anything last year, but to be honest...I started late, didn't scout, and went at it alone as far as learning/scouting/etc.

Much like the OP, I was looking (and still am) for pointers on finding my own spots rather than expecting a seasoned hunter to just hand over a honey hole. Actually, I'd be more interested in someone telling me basically where NOT to bother trying. I feel like I'd be a little more comfortable tagging along with an experienced hunter, maybe not in a particularly super-secret spot, but to lead me in the right direction, locate some sign, break off and each try a spot semi-near each other. This way if/when one of us takes a shot, sees an animal, etc. I can learn "on the spot". If that makes any sense...
Agree

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Pointer 1: Stay away from Pheasant stocked WMAs. [smile]

Pointer 2: 80% of the deer occupy 20% of the woods. So find that 20% and you'll have success.

Pointer 3: Look at a map of your hunting area. If hunting public land draw a 3/4 mile radius circle around all parking areas and access areas. Don't bother hunting within that circle. All the deer will be well busted out of these areas. Most hunters are lazy and hunt within a mile of their truck. So you'll see more hunters then deer within this range.

Pointer 4: Don't do all day sits unless you're in the peak of the chase/rut. This is only about 15% to 18% of the total season. Hunt the AM, then relocate (still hunting while relocating) mid day for the evening hunt. Staying in one spot all day just has your scent permeate the woods.

Pointer 5: Learn thermals!! Don't just hunt the prevailing wind. On light and variable wind days the thermals play a larger role in carrying your scent then the wind. Example: When near water in the AM the cold water will cool the air immediately above it. This effect will pull air down from above the water and push it out and up the shore, up embankments, hills, etc. In the evening the warmer water (having been warmed by the sun all day) will heat the cooler evening air causing it to rise. This effect will then pull air from the shore out to over the water and then up..

Pointer 6: Use pointer 5 to determine where to put your stand and also what height to set at.

Pointer 7: Don't walk or cross game trails when scouting close to or in season. Deer will know you where there and when. After experiencing some hunting pressure they will leave the area and probably not return anytime soon.

Pointer 8: Don't waste your money on urine scents. Deer know and are familiar with the other deer in their area. They will pick up on unfamiliar deer. Most scents in a bottle come from multiple deer too and will not appear natural to them. Also most hunters bath in a half bottle of doe in estrus scent each time they go out and deer quickly learn to associate it with hunter pressure. They also learn to associate hunting pressure with unnatural amounts of scent. However food scents are okay (apples, acorns, etc..)

Pointer 9: You don't need fancy odor free body wash. Dove sensitive skin is unscented and will be far less harsh on your skin. Use the shampoo though.

Pointer 10. Most of your scent comes from your feet, hair, breath, armpits and groin. So use scent eliminating/free hunting shampoo, SmartMouth Mouthwash, hunting ANTIPERSPIRANT (not just deodorant), and make your own odor eliminating spray consisting of baking soda, distilled water, and hydrogen peroxide. Google the mix ratio. Spray down with the stuff.

Pointer 11: Wear rubber boots. (see pointer 10)

Pointer 12: Layer up and down as climate dictates. Avoid sweating at all costs. However be prepared for the weather. Nothing ends a hunt quicker than being cold. Avoid cotton. As in don't wear any at all. Go for wool.

Pointer 13: No matter how much money and effort you expend on scent control - a deer will still pick you off a 1/4 mile away if the wind is in their favor. Just about all of those "scent block" this and "activated carbon" that is nothing more then pixie dust designed to separate hunters from their money.

Pointer 14: Deer aren't stupid. They position themselves to use the weather, thermals and their senses to their best advantage. See point 13. So use this knowledge to yours.

Pointer 15: Deer get skittish during high winds. It deprives them use of their senses. The entire forest is moving in the wind making vision less effective, scent is carried away, and the noise deprives them of their hearing. Don't expect to see much movement during these times. So you need to change tactics. Sitting in a stand or ground blind will likely not be productive.

Pointer 16: Deer move to food during cold fronts.

Pointer 17: Deer movement is better during a rising barometer.

Pointer 18: A hanging moon late in the AM (8:30ish) causes deer to stay on their feet later than they normally would.

Pointer 19: When hunting early season stick to the evenings. Most deer are back in bed by shooting hours. Around 11/1 start hunting AMs. Around 11/10 start hunting all day.

Pointer 20: Keep scouting and hitting the woods in October. But stick to the man made trails - or at least stay away from your hunting spots. When you start seeing scrapes on the trails (usually 7 to 10 days after the moon waxes full) - count 28 days forward on the calendar. This will mark the peak of the doe herd's estrus cycle (and the lock down phase). The proceeding week you should see a lot of chasing and activity.

Pointer 21. Know your woods. Bring a compass and make sure you know how to use it to navigate and hit your marks. Especially if you're hunting swamps or marshes. this can make the difference between getting out dry or having to swim out. A GPS is a very nice tool - but batteries or electronics can die at the most inconvenient times. Especially in the cold. Glow tacks just lead others to your spots. Use then to mark your tree - but not your trail or path in/out.

Pointer 22 - always have a fully charged cell

Pointer 23 - always make sure to tell your family where you'll be going. Leave a map. Text them if you decide to change locations/woods during the hunt.

pointer 24 - Take the junk harness that comes with whatever tree stand you buy and throw it in the trash. Buy a good one - hunter safety systems as an example. You're life is worth the hundred bucks. Replace the harness every 3rd year. Replace it immediately if you ever have a fall. Replace the primary tree strap every year if it even looks a tiny bit frayed.

Pointer 25: Use Sawyer Permethrin. Ticks suck. Lyme disease or any other tick born disease sucks more.

Pointer 26: Get in shape. You can't overstate the benefit of this.

Pointer 27: Watch several hunting shows with Lee and Tiffany (or whomever). Whatever they do (like hunting on a field edge) do the opposite!!! This isn't Iowa and you're not on 1500 private acres with food plots.

Others may chime in with more info. The above pointers on deer behavior are generalizations. There are no certainties or guarantees. You have to keep your head up and make adjustments as the season progresses. Don't be afraid to change it up if what you're doing isn't working. Lack of confidence will cost you more deer than anything else.
 
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Pointer 1: Stay away from Pheasant stocked WMAs. [smile]

Pointer 2: 80% of the deer occupy 20% of the woods. So find that 20% and you'll have success.

Pointer 3: Look at a map of your hunting area. If hunting public land draw a 3/4 mile radius circle around all parking areas and access areas. Don't bother hunting within that circle. All the deer will be well busted out of these areas. Most hunters are lazy and hunt within a mile of their truck. So you'll see more hunters then deer within this range.

Pointer 4: Don't do all day sits unless you're in the peak of the chase/rut. This is only about 15% to 18% of the total season. Hunt the AM, then relocate (still hunting while relocating) mid day for the evening hunt. Staying in one spot all day just has your scent permeate the woods.

Pointer 5: Learn thermals!! Don't just hunt the prevailing wind. On light and variable wind days the thermals play a larger role in carrying your scent then the wind. Example: When near water in the AM the cold water will cool the air immediately above it. This effect will pull air down from above the water and push it out and up the shore, up embankments, hills, etc. In the evening the warmer water (having been warmed by the sun all day) will heat the cooler evening air causing it to rise. This effect will then pull air from the shore out to over the water and then up..

Pointer 6: Use pointer 5 to determine where to put your stand and also what height to set at.

Pointer 7: Don't walk or cross game trails when scouting close to or in season. Deer will know you where there and when. After experiencing some hunting pressure they will leave the area and probably not return anytime soon.

Pointer 8: Don't waste your money on urine scents. Deer know and are familiar with the other deer in their area. They will pick up on unfamiliar deer. Most scents in a bottle come from multiple deer too and will not appear natural to them. Also most hunters bath in a half bottle of doe in estrus scent each time they go out and deer quickly learn to associate it with hunter pressure. They also learn to associate hunting pressure with unnatural amounts of scent. However food scents are okay (apples, acorns, etc..)

Pointer 9: You don't need fancy odor free body wash. Dove sensitive skin is unscented and will be far less harsh on your skin. Use the shampoo though.

Pointer 10. Most of your scent comes from your feet, hair, breath, armpits and groin. So use scent eliminating/free hunting shampoo, SmartMouth Mouthwash, hunting ANTIPERSPIRANT (not just deodorant), and make your own odor eliminating spray consisting of baking soda, distilled water, and hydrogen peroxide. Google the mix ratio. Spray down with the stuff.

Pointer 11: Wear rubber boots. (see pointer 10)

Pointer 12: Layer up and down as climate dictates. Avoid sweating at all costs. However be prepared for the weather. Nothing ends a hunt quicker than being cold. Avoid cotton. As in don't wear any at all. Go for wool.

Pointer 13: No matter how much money and effort you expend on scent control - a deer will still pick you off a 1/4 mile away if the wind is in their favor. Just about all of those "scent block" this and "activated carbon" that is nothing more then pixie dust designed to separate hunters from their money.

Pointer 14: Deer aren't stupid. They position themselves to use the weather, thermals and their senses to their best advantage. See point 13. So use this knowledge to yours.

Pointer 15: Deer get skittish during high winds. It deprives them use of their senses. The entire forest is moving in the wind making vision less effective, scent is carried away, and the noise deprives them of their hearing. Don't expect to see much movement during these times. So you need to change tactics. Sitting in a stand or ground blind will likely not be productive.

Pointer 16: Deer move to food during cold fronts.

Pointer 17: Deer movement is better during a rising barometer.

Pointer 18: A hanging moon late in the AM (8:30ish) causes deer to stay on their feet later than they normally would.

Pointer 19: When hunting early season stick to the evenings. Most deer are back in bed by shooting hours. Around 11/1 start hunting AMs. Around 11/10 start hunting all day.

Pointer 20: Keep scouting and hitting the woods in October. But stick to the man made trails - or at least stay away from your hunting spots. When you start seeing scrapes on the trails (usually 7 to 10 days after the moon waxes full) - count 28 days forward on the calendar. This will mark the peak of the doe herd's estrus cycle (and the lock down phase). The proceeding week you should see a lot of chasing and activity.

Pointer 21. Know your woods. Bring a compass and make sure you know how to use it to navigate and hit your marks. Especially if you're hunting swamps or marshes. this can make the difference between getting out dry or having to swim out. A GPS is a very nice tool - but batteries or electronics can die at the most inconvenient times. Especially in the cold. Glow tacks just lead others to your spots. Use then to mark your tree - but not your trail or path in/out.

Pointer 22 - always have a fully charged cell

Pointer 23 - always make sure to tell your family where you'll be going. Leave a map. Text them if you decide to change locations/woods during the hunt.

pointer 24 - Take the junk harness that comes with whatever tree stand you buy and throw it in the trash. Buy a good one - hunter safety systems as an example. You're life is worth the hundred bucks. Replace the harness every 3rd year. Replace it immediately if you ever have a fall. Replace the primary tree strap every year if it even looks a tiny bit frayed.

Pointer 25: Use Sawyer Permethrin. Ticks suck. Lyme disease or any other tick born disease sucks more.

Pointer 26: Get in shape. You can't overstate the benefit of this.

Pointer 27: Watch several hunting shows with Lee and Tiffany (or whomever). Whatever they do (like hunting on a field edge) do the opposite!!! This isn't Iowa and you're not on 1500 private acres with food plots.

Others may chime in with more info. The above pointers on deer behavior are generalizations. There are no certainties or guarantees. You have to keep your head up and make adjustments as the season progresses. Don't be afraid to change it up if what you're doing isn't working. Lack of confidence will cost you more deer than anything else.
This was very good info, thank you.
 
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No problem. If whitetail is the game you choose to chase then I have one more pointer.... There is NO off season. When hunting season ends at the end of December then January you should be in the woods scouting. You want to discover their winter travel patterns, food sources, and where they yard up. Keep at it until spring.

Scouting when the forest is green is of little value. They have many more food sources and thus their travel patterns and bedding locations will be completely different. The forest floor also affords them a lot more cover. Swamps dry up, etc. So whatever they're doing during the spring and summer they won't be doing in the fall.

This time of year is when you tune up your previously chosen areas to hunt. Cut shooting lanes that may have become grown in, etc. Do cyber scouting to find new areas to investigate on foot when the leaves fall.

It's a year long process that never ends. You don't have to put in the work. You can just hit the woods. But your odds of success go waaaaaaay down if you skip the homework.


.... if you hang out here long enough you'll learn who the people are that you want to listen to. The hunting section is pretty quiet at the moment - but about a month before whitetail opens until it closes it will pick up steam.. They'll be some mega threads popping up with pics of harvests, etc. Some will post stories, etc.
 
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Preban, do you have any advice about calling in the rut? How about early season? And really don't use scent to bring them in or stop them in front of your stand?

No problem. If whitetail is the game you choose to chase then I have one more pointer.... There is NO off season. When hunting season ends at the end of December then January you should be in the woods scouting. You want to discover their winter travel patterns, food sources, and where they yard up. Keep at it until spring.

Scouting when the forest is green is of little value. They have many more food sources and thus their travel patterns and bedding locations will be completely different. The forest floor also affords them a lot more cover. Swamps dry up, etc. So whatever they're doing during the spring and summer they won't be doing in the fall.

This time of year is when you tune up your previously chosen areas to hunt. Cut shooting lanes that may have become grown in, etc. Do cyber scouting to find new areas to investigate on foot when the leaves fall.

It's a year long process that never ends. You don't have to put in the work. You can just hit the woods. But your odds of success go waaaaaaay down if you skip the homework.


.... if you hang out here long enough you'll learn who the people are that you want to listen to. The hunting section is pretty quiet at the moment - but about a month before whitetail opens until it closes it will pick up steam.. They'll be some mega threads popping up with pics of harvests, etc. Some will post stories, etc.
 

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Bump to see if Preban has advice for calling throughout the season.
 
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Use the 80-20 rule.

This rule states you should spend 80% of your time in the woods scouting and learning your pray, and 20% of your time hunting. One tip I will give(and this is a constant for all deer), when the white oak acorns fall, the deer will drop all other food sources to eat them. Good hunting!

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Use the 80-20 rule.

This rule states you should spend 80% of your time in the woods scouting and learning your pray, and 20% of your time hunting. One tip I will give(and this is a constant for all deer), when the white oak acorns fall, the deer will drop all other food sources to eat them. Good hunting!

StevensMarksman


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....With one exception... Maple leaves. Right after they fall. They're seem to be a bigger draw then acorns. When there are isolated patches of them anyway. But most of the oaks in my neck of the woods are red oaks. Maybe they don't like them as much..

I've never had much luck calling deer. I had it work just one time. I was actually trying something I had read in a book by Peter Fiduccia. I got on the grunt tube while trotting through the woods trying to sound like a deer. It brought in a doe who peaked out of some thick scrub. Once she saw me though she went bounding off. I was too busy acting a fool to get a shot off. But it seemingly worked.

Peter's perspective on calling is to create the "total illusion". Grunting on it's own is unnatural. But if you put down a couple drops of urine, a drop of interdigital, and trot while grunting - you've created the "total illusion". It's what naturally occurs and matches the experience deer are used to..

I've stopped deer by grunting at them. But otherwise have never called them in.

Watch these 8 or so videos from him.. Well worth it if you're serious about trying to do it right. They're interesting.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mopB6hhDyak&index=7&list=PLiC_jo8cE9XRsudkhX5NUgpApeDKhg0Rb
His book was excellent too.
http://www.amazon.com/Shooters-Bibl...qid=1440469942&sr=8-2&keywords=peter+fiduccia
 
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