Lee Load Master: If Your 223 Rem Cases Topple Over While Feeding This Will Help

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I just started reloading 223 Rem and after tweaking over and over I haven't been able to get it to feed the cases without them intermittently toppling over. The weight of the cases in the tube sitting on the case being fed along with the fact that they are thin, tall and bottlenecked cause some to tip over. Sometimes when they tip over they get caught up in the shell plate and I have to stop what I'm doing to get it out. I decided to try and rig something up to prevent the cases in the tube from sitting on the case being fed and this is what I've come up with so far. This is my first crack at it and I'll be refining it but so far it works. I call it a Case Throttle.
 
I just made a delrin block the same profile as the case pusher and double sided taped them together. The combination is just a little shorter than the cases, I don't have any issues with cases toppling over because they're fully supported. This is on a lee pro-1000 but the mechanism is the same.
 
I just made a delrin block the same profile as the case pusher and double sided taped them together. The combination is just a little shorter than the cases, I don't have any issues with cases toppling over because they're fully supported. This is on a lee pro-1000 but the mechanism is the same.

That occurred to me, but I was doing this late at night and only had stuff in my garage to work with so I went with it. The spring and lock nut came the next day.
I thought of stacking two pushers with double sided tape but it doesn't clear the frame. The small pistol pushers are shorter than the small rifle pushers but it's still too high.
Where did you get the Delrin?
Also, does that help prevent the last two or three cases from falling through the bottom? Pretty much every time I get to the last three cases they all fall straight down through the tube and onto the floor.
 
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I added a wood block on top of the feeder and made a notch in it a bit wider than the 223 case. That helps keep the case from topping forward but it can still topple side to side so I'm still using the throttle. That keeps the cases from falling through the tube if the case on the feeder doesn't land square. I also use it to keep the cases in the tube when I want to stop loading or if I make a mistake and have to clear the shell plate and don't want more cases fed. Normally if the tubes are full it's a pain to take the collator off without cases falling through.
 
I cut the same profile in the delrin that the original block has, I think it was about 5/8" half circle - I used the biggest end mill I had on hand and free formed the shape. I had the scrap delrin and used that because it is slippery and it easily slides beneath the next case waiting to drop.
 
I used wood because it's all I had but will look for some plastic. For the cut I used a dremel tool with one of the barrel shaped sanding wheels. It cut a perfect notch into the wood. I used the larger wheel first but cases still wobbled a bit so I used the smaller wheel. It's about 2-3 mm wider than the case. I loaded a couple hundred rounds last night and it worked great.
 
I call this the "Jackpot". This is the only thing I hate about my LoadMaster.

You have a great solution by the way.

Then you need a 6Gears Inc. Case Throttle! [laugh]
This video shows me loading up some 223, and on two occasions the case throttle prevented what you call the jackpot. I call it an "avalanche" but it's the same thing. [angry]
It's also good for when you have a problem or just want to stop. The case throttle will hold the remaining cases in the tube so you can cycle the cases on the shell plate through without more cases being fed and you can keep the collator in place.
My goal is to automate it so on the down swing of the lever it feeds a case and goes back to hold by itself.
 
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